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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • IEEE Communications Magazine - Dec. 2006

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of Contents - Vol 44 No 12

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 2 - 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Of interest to our engineering practitioners ...

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 6 - 8
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  • Looking back and ahead

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 10
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  • Conference calendar

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 12 - 16
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  • New products

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 18 - 20
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  • Puzzle No. 286

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 22
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  • IEEE Radio Communications Components, Systems, and Networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 24
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  • Does the wireless industry really need all of these standards?

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 26 - 28
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    There is an ongoing proliferation of standards impacting the development of wireless technology and products. Looking at the large collection of existing and emerging standards supporting the wireless systems that are available on the market, one has to wonder whether the wireless community really need all of these standards. After examining both why and how standards are created, we can say that the more standards available, whether they are competing or complementary, the greater the choices for the market, and thus the greater the chance the market will have access to the best technologies to suit its need. The proliferation of standards in the long term fosters competition, lowers prices to consumers, and allows for innovation in other areas View full abstract»

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  • Understanding UMTS Radio Network Modelling, Planning and Automated Optimization, Theory and Practice [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 30
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  • Implementing cooperative diversity antenna arrays with commodity hardware

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 33 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (1)
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    Cooperation among single-antenna transceivers and formation of distributed antenna arrays has recently attracted considerable interest. Such distributed antenna arrays are envisioned to provide resistance to slow wireless fading and improve performance of point-to-point wireless communication across various dimensions. Despite the plethora of recently proposed theoretical approaches that promise gains due to diversity at the physical layer though cooperation (cooperative diversity), there is not much work in the implementation of cooperative antenna arrays with existing wireless transceivers. In this article we summarize the main challenges in implementation of cooperative diversity antenna arrays for realistic wireless networks. We then present the basic building blocks of a cooperative diversity demonstration realized in the lab, utilizing commodity radio hardware. Our work sheds light onto the synergies needed between the physical, link, and routing layers that significantly simplify the overall network operation and decrease the transceiver complexity in cooperative diversity antenna arrays, making feasible the utilization of (existing) commodity radio hardware View full abstract»

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  • The evolution path of 4G networks: FDD or TDD?

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 42 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (34)  |  Patents (1)
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    Frequency-division duplexing and time-division duplexing are two common duplexing methods used in various wireless systems. However, there are advantages and technical issues associated with them. In this article we discuss in detail the features, and the design and implementation challenges of FDD and TDD systems for 4G wireless systems. In particular, we present a number of advantages and flexibilities an TDD system can bring to 4G systems that an FDD system cannot offer, and identify the major challenges, including cross-slot interference, in applying TDD in practice. Due to the fact that cross-slot interference is one of the critical challenges to employing TDD in cellular networks, we also provide a quantitative analysis on its impact on co-channel and adjacent channel interfering cells View full abstract»

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  • Cognitive networks: adaptation and learning to achieve end-to-end performance objectives

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 51 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (141)
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    In this article we advance the idea of a cognitive network, capable of perceiving current network conditions and then planning, learning, and acting according to end-to-end goals. Cognitive networks are motivated by the complexity, heterogeneity, and reliability requirements of tomorrow's networks, which are increasingly expected to self-organize to meet user and application objectives. We compare and contrast cognitive networks with related research on cognitive radios and cross-layer design. By defining cognitive networks, examining their relationship to other technologies, discussing critical design issues, and providing a framework for implementation, we aim to establish a foundation for further research and discussion View full abstract»

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  • Advances in control and management of connection-oriented networks [Guest Eeditorial]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 58 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • On the challenges of establishing disjoint QoS IP/MPLS paths across multiple domains

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 60 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (2)
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    MPLS is being actively adopted as the core switching infrastructure at the intradomain level. This trend is mainly attributable to the undeniable potential of MPLS in terms of virtual private networks (VPNs) management, traffic engineering (TE), QoS delivery, path protection, and fast recovery from network failures. However, little progress has been made to attain the expected extension of MPLS label-switched paths (LSPs) across domain boundaries. Among the problems that remain unsolved is how to efficiently find and establish primary and protection interdomain LSPs for mission-critical services subject to QoS constraints. This article explores the major limitations hindering the deployment of these kinds of LSPs across multiple domains, in the context of the current interdomain network model. We describe the critical problems faced by the research community, and present our vision on how to rationally overcome some of the problems exposed. Our perspective is that we should be prepared for rather coarse-grained solutions as long as we need to coexist with the current interdomain network model View full abstract»

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  • Toward automated provisioning of advance reservation service in next-generation optical internet

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 68 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (15)
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    The Internet is expected to support a variety of network services for its vast individual and business users. Advance reservation is a promising network service in which network resources are automatically allocated and reserved in advance of the time the resources are actually needed, which allows service providers to more efficiently manage network resources and thus provide better network services. For the next-generation Internet, the underlying transport infrastructure is evolving towards a network that integrates fiber-optic technology and generalized multi-protocol label switching (GMPLS) technology. In this article we present a basic framework for automated provisioning of advance reservation service in the next-generation optical Internet, discuss the major issues involved, and explore possible solutions. It is also our hope to stimulate further studies in order to realize the vision of this promising network service View full abstract»

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  • Challenges and requirements for introducing impairment-awareness into the management and control planes of ASON/GMPLS WDM networks

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 76 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (45)  |  Patents (3)
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    The absence of electrical regenerators in transparent WDM networks significantly contributes to reduce the overall network cost. In transparent WDM networks, a proper resource allocation requires that the presence of physical impairments in routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) and lightpath provisioning be taken into account. In this article a centralized, a hybrid centralized-distributed and two distributed approaches that integrate information about most relevant physical impairments in RWA and lightpath provisioning are presented and assessed. Both centralized and hybrid approaches perform a centralized path computation at the management-plane level, utilizing physical impairment information, while the lightpath provisioning is done by the management plane or the control plane, respectively. The distributed approaches fall entirely within the scope of the ASON/GMPLS control plane. For these two approaches, we provide functional requirements, architectural functional blocks, and protocol extensions for implementing either an impairment-aware real-time RWA, or a lightpath provisioning based on impairment-aware signaling. View full abstract»

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  • Layer 1 virtual private network management by users

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 86 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    The layer 1 virtual private network (LlVPN) technology supports multiple user networks over a common carrier transport network. Emerging L1VPN services allow: L1VPNs to be built over multiple carrier networks; L1VPNs to lease or trade resources with each other; and users to reconfigure an L1VPN topology, and add or remove bandwidth. The trend is to offer increased flexibility and provide management functions as close to users as possible, while maintaining proper resource access right control. In this article two aspects of the L1VPN service and management architectures are discussed: management of carrier network partitions for L1VPNs, and L1VPN management by users. We present the carrier network partitioning at the network element (NE) and L1VPN levels. As an example, a transaction language one (TL1) proxy is developed to achieve carrier network partitioning at the NE level. The TL1 proxy is implemented without any modifications to the existing NE management system. On top of the TL1 proxy, a Web services (WS)-based L1VPN management tool is implemented. Carriers use the tool to partition resources at the L1VPN level by assigning resources, together with the WS-based management services for the resources, to L1VPNs. L1VPN administrators use the tool to receive resource partitions from multiple carriers and partner L1VPNs. Further resource partitioning or regrouping can be conducted on the received resources, and leasing or trading resources with partner LlVPNs is supported. These services offer a potential business model for a physical network broker. After the L1VPN administrators compose the use scenarios of resources, and make the use scenarios available to the L1VPN end users as WS, the end users reconfigure the L1VPN without intervention from the administrator. The tool accomplishes LlVPN management by users View full abstract»

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  • How to buy a network: trading of resources in the physical layer

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 94 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
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    Recently, a number of new research initiatives, most notably UCLPv2 and GENI, have promoted the dynamic partition of physical network resources (infrastructure) as the means to operate the network, and to implement new protocols and services. This has led to a number of open issues such as resource discovery, implementation of resource partitioning, and the aggregation of resources to create arbitrary network topologies. To us, the key issue is the design of a mechanism to trade, acquire, and control network resources, given a choice of providers of physical resources (infrastructure providers). In this article we present an architecture that allows physical resources to be traded, while granting users controlled access to the acquired resources via a policy enforcement mechanism. In addition, it allows resource provider domains to be linked via configurable, provider-neutral resource exchange points that are the physical resource equivalents of the pooling point, or Internet exchange point (IXP). We demonstrate how our trading system will operate by presenting a use case in which a network topology is constructed using resources from multiple providers, be it Internet service providers (ISPs), or National Research Experimental Network (NREN) providers. The use case also shows how a dynamic reconfiguration can be effected by the customer though the use of simple access control policies, without involving the provider View full abstract»

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  • Extending generalized multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS) for polymorphous, agile, and transparent optical networks (PATON)

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 104 - 114
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
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    This article presents a vision for the emerging integrated optical networks to meet various traffic requirements and design criteria. To address the shortcomings in today's GMPLS over wavelength-routed optical networks, a new network architecture called polymorphous, agile, and transparent optical networks (PATON) is proposed. PATON uses polymorphous optical burst switching (POBS) to seamlessly integrate different signaling, switching, and reservation schemes. The main features of PATON, along with its benefits as well as design and implementation challenges, are also described. Finally, both qualitative and quantitative performance comparisons of POBS with the two representative IP/GMPLS/OCS approaches are provided View full abstract»

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  • Topics in circuits for communications series [guest Editorial]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 116
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  • CMOS tuners for mobile TV

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 118 - 125
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    Digital video reception is emerging as the latest feature toward multimedia-enriched handheld devices. Mobile battery-operated devices require small-size tuners that consume low power and are amenable to single-chip integration with the baseband demodulator. Following an overview of the system and circuit-level implementation challenges of mobile TV standards such as DVB-H and T-DMB, this article presents a dual-band direct conversion tuner for DVB-H. Architecture and circuit trade-offs are discussed, and detailed measurements are presented. The tuner occupies 9.7 mm2 and achieves a 4 dB NF at both UHF and L-band, eliminating the need for an external LNA. By using a fractional-TV synthesizer both 470-890 MHz and 1.4-1.8 GHz bands are supported, while achieving an integrated phase noise of less than -41 dBc. Sixth-order low-pass filters support channel bandwidths from 4 to 10 MHz View full abstract»

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  • Ordered and chaotic electrical solitons: communication perspectives

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 126 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    While the use of sinusoidal electromagnetic waves as information carriers is taken as one of the principal axioms of today's wireless system design, certain nonsinusoidal waves may further enrich the scope and capacity of modern wireless engineering. Two notable nonsinusoid examples are impulses and chaotic signals. The short temporal width of impulses has enabled applications such as ranging radars and ultra wideband (UWB). The complex nature of chaotic signals offers a new means of encrypted communication. Here we review a new circuit paradigm, the electrical soliton oscillator, which can self-generate both impulse and chaotic signals of very large bandwidth by leveraging the singular dynamics of a nonlinear wave known as the electrical soliton. By combining a nonlinear transmission line with a unique amplifier that can "tame" the inherently unruly dynamics of solitons, the oscillator self-generates a stable, periodic train of short impulses. If the taming functions of the amplifier are turned off, the circuit self-generates chaotic signals by positively exploiting solitons' unruly nature. While still in its early stages, this soliton circuit may one day serve as the heartbeat of both impulse and chaotic wireless systems View full abstract»

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  • Advertisers' index

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 136
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies