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Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on

Issue 7 • Date Sep 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Medical applications in a B-ISDN field trial

    Page(s): 1173 - 1187
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    The need for high-speed communications networks that enable users to access remote resources will accelerate the development of many innovative distributed applications in the health care industry. A B-ISDN field trial network has been developed in North Carolina as a multiservice testbed for advanced applications research and development. The paper describes the research on two high-performance medical applications, the network equipment, and terminal interface adapters that have been implemented to serve those applications, and the insights that have been gained from this field trial experience View full abstract»

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  • The digital radiology environment

    Page(s): 1133 - 1144
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    The problems of implementing a digital radiology environment are addressed, focusing on the role of communications. Because the digital radiology environment is essentially a medical image multimedia system, the medical information industry could take advantage of recent advances in managing multimedia systems that deal with applications, such as prepress formatting and CAE/CAD/CAM. The paper describes the experience of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University relative to the digital radiology environment. Next, impediments to the implementation of a digital radiology environment are presented. Suggestions to the ACR/NEMA Digital Imaging and Communications (DICOM) Standard, a standard being jointly developed by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the National Electronics Manufacturing Association (NEMA), are examined, and suggestions for its use in the digital radiology environment are given. A digital radiology environment architecture is proposed View full abstract»

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  • Architecture of a comprehensive radiologic imaging network

    Page(s): 1188 - 1196
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    An emerging concept in picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) is the PACS infrastructure. The critical components in this infrastructure are communication systems, cluster controller, database integration, fault-tolerant design, and systems integration software. The architecture of a comprehensive communication system within this infrastructure, which will support a digital-based radiology operation, is described. This communication network consists of a real-time analog video and digital components. The video network utilizes broadband and fiber-optic communication technologies. The digital communication is based on a three-tiered network integrating Ethernet, FDDI, and Ultranet technologies. The digital network uses the standard TCP/IP protocol and has a fault-tolerant design. Both components have been in clinical operation since the summer of 1991 View full abstract»

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  • Multimedia communications in medical imaging

    Page(s): 1121 - 1132
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    Changes in imaging technology and applications make it possible to obtain more information about patients. Information management systems, however, lag behind those achievements. The need to access and disseminate the growing volumes of patient-based information is acute. Direct effects in improving patient care, cost efficiencies in delivery, and decision making and improved communications can be gained by providing seamless views of integrated data. A prototype multimedia application that addresses work flow, human interface, and information integration and technologies is being developed. The article describes the history, need, and technical considerations involved in that development effort View full abstract»

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  • A multimedia interhospital communications system for medical consultations

    Page(s): 1145 - 1157
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    The authors present a study whose main objective has been to explore the use of high-bandwidth multimedia communications technology for medical applications physically distributed among hospitals, that is to say an interhospital multimedia communications system. The design and development issues of a prototype are described, as well as the results of an in-field trial. From the results of this trial, a performance study has been developed for evaluating the expected communications requirements of a large-scale configuration of the system View full abstract»

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  • Impact of PACS on radiologists' daily work in western countries

    Page(s): 1158 - 1160
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    The following questions are discussed in relation to the different phases of the radiological imaging process. (1) What is the impact of the picture archiving communication system (PACS) on the reading of radiological examinations? (2) After years of centralization, will radiology again decentralize due to the possibilities of PACS? (3) Who is responsible for the radiological information? (4) What has to be done by radiologists to keep control of radiology? It is argued that radiologists must actively participate in defining future requirements View full abstract»

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  • A fiber-optic line-switching network with a 150 Mb/s user data rate

    Page(s): 1197 - 1202
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    The authors describe ImNet/2, a fiber-optic local area network, which has been specially developed for rapid image transport in picture archiving and communications systems (PACS). A comprehensive analysis of image communication requirements in hospitals led to the conclusion that current LANs would not be satisfactory under routine workload. ImNet/2 is optimized for the transmission of large datafiles. It applies line switching by means of active switch modules in a multistar topology. Once established, a link between two image equipment units continuously transfers data at a speed of 140 mB/s. Each switch unit has a total data throughput of 1.12 Gb/s. Asynchronous parallel network ports and a simple lightweight high-speed protocol make it easy to interface the network to image workstations and PACS servers. The mechanisms and components of ImNet/2 are described in detail View full abstract»

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  • Teleradiology using switched dialup networks

    Page(s): 1161 - 1172
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    A dialup wide-bandwidth digital teleradiology system is discussed. A laser film digitizer and a gray scale display system are used at Irwin and Munson Army Community Hospitals to digitize radiographic films and display digital images. A laser film printer at the University of Kansas Medical Center generates a film hardcopy of the transmitted digital data, and an interactive gray scale display is used to review the digital image data. The communication system consists of dialup switched multiple 56000 b/s digital channels, transmitting digital image data in parallel. Conventional radiographic films, multiformat camera films, and laser printed films from multimodality imaging systems have been successfully digitized, transmitted, and laser film recorded or gray scale displayed. It was found that the system provided clinically acceptable image quality reproductions View full abstract»

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  • Considerations in moving electronic radiography into routine use

    Page(s): 1108 - 1120
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    Primary diagnosis plays a central role in the establishment of electronic radiography as a trusted technology. From this technology, other applications in radiology and medicine can easily flow. The fidelity of the electronic presentation of images, the ability of the radiologist to transfer film-based reading skills to a digitally based presentation, and the achievement of improvements in diagnostic efficiency are three important steps to building confidence in electronic methods in radiology. A discussion of these issues is presented as a prelude to the description of a plan for the use of broadband technology and multimedia in electronic radiography, both within and between hospitals View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications focuses on all telecommunications, including telephone, telegraphy, facsimile, and point-to-point television, by electromagnetic propagation.

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Editor-in-Chief
Muriel Médard
MIT