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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 7 • Date Oct. 1983

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 42
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • High resolution, low cost graphics should be more than a retrothought [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Image manipulations in seconds, not hours [advertisment]

    Page(s): 1
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  • A new perspective on graphics

    Page(s): 2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 3
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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): 4
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  • National Computer Graphics Association

    Page(s): 5
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  • Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling: A Key to Effective Use of Computers in Science and Engineering

    Page(s): 6 - 7
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  • Here's your Blueprint for Getting into Graphics ... Quickly, Economically, and Safely [advertisement]

    Page(s): 8
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  • A survey of the representation and design of surfaces

    Page(s): 9 - 16
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    The surface appropriate for a given problem depends on the application; there is no universal surface form. The numerous applications of surface methods include modeling physical phenomena (e.g., combustion) and designing objects such as airplanes and cars. In addition to these 3D surfaces, there are interesting 4D "surfaces" such as temperature as a function of the three spatial variables. Because the geometric information for these problems can be located arbitrarily in 3D or 4-Dimensional space, the schemes must be able to handle arbitrarily located data. The standard (and easier) approach to surfacesusing tensor products of curve methods-restricts the surface method's applicability to rectangularly "gridded" data. Two broad classes of methods suitable for solving these problems (i.e., problems for which simplifying geometric assumptions cannot be made) are (1) surface interpolants defined over triangles or tetrahedra and (2) distanceweighted interpolants. Users ordinarily want smoother surfaces than their data imply directly, so additional information must usually be created. (A notable feature of the methods shown here is that the smoothness of the surface is always greater than or equal to the smoothness of the defining data. The author covers Surface form selection (Interpolation versus approximation; Representation versus design; Smoothness; Shape fidelity; Local versus global methods; and Rendering), and Interpolation surfaces. It is noted that triangular interpolants and distance-weighted interpolants excel as surface methods because of their smooth interpolation of arbitrarily located data. View full abstract»

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  • The Terminal that's a Perfect Fit Anywhere in your Company [advertisement]

    Page(s): 17
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  • The Image Solution [advertisement]

    Page(s): 22
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  • Computer Graphics People [advertisement]

    Page(s): 23 - 24
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  • Solid modeling: current status and research directions

    Page(s): 25 - 37
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    The March 1982 issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications was devoted to solid modeling. The lead article in that issuel summarized the history of the field and its status as of late 1981; this article is an update to the 1982 article. Here, we shall note the proliferation of commercial systems over the past two years, discuss changes in system organization, and summarize applications support. We shall also survey work aimed at enhancing the geometric coverage, the applications coverage, and the performance of solid modeling systems. Research is progressing swiftly on several fronts, and it is virtually certain that late-1980s solid modelers will be markedly more powerful than those available now. View full abstract»

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  • Do these Tough Demands Blow your Graphics Apart?

    Page(s): 38
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  • Intersection of parametric surfaces by means of look-up tables

    Page(s): 39 - 48
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    When primitive parametric surfaces are combined and modified inferactively to form complex intersecting surfaces, it becomes important to find the curves of intersection. One must distinguish between finding the shape of the intersection curve, which might only be useful for display, and finding an accurate mathematical representation of the curve. The latter is important for any meaningful geometric modeling, analysis, design, or manufacture involving the intersection. The intersection curve between parametric surfaces is important in such computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) functions as shape design, analysis of groins, design of fillets, and computation of numerically controlled tooling paths. The algorithm presented here provides an adequately accurate mathematical representation of the intersection curve. It also provides a database to simplify such operations as hidden-surface removal, surface rendering, profile identification, and interference or clearance computations. Further, the algorithm facilitates creating and changing a finite element mesh in the intersection region. View full abstract»

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  • The Ingredients of a Challenge. [advertisement]

    Page(s): 48
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  • When Texas Instruments and Tektronix team up, brilliant ideas take shape. [advertisement]

    Page(s): 481 - 484
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  • An urnful of blending functions

    Page(s): 49 - 54
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    The author explores the link between probability and geometry. In the process, he shows how to exploit simple probabilistic arguments to derive many of the classical geometric properties of the parametric curves and surfaces currently in vogue in computer-aided geometric design. He also uses this probabilistic approach to introduce many new types of curves and surfaces into computer-aided geometric design, and demonstrates how probability theory can be used to simplify, unify, and generalize many well-known results. He concludes that urn models are a powerful tool for generating discrete probability distributions, and built into these special distributions are many propitious properties essential to the blending functions of computer-aided geometric design. This fact allows mathematicians to use probabilistic arguments to simplify, unify, and generalize many geometric results. He believes that this link between probability and geometry will ultimately prove beneficial to both disciplines, and expects that it will continue to be a productive area for future inspiration and research. View full abstract»

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  • New 110?? Low Cost Stator Yoke [advertisement]

    Page(s): 54
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  • New The CDCT 5000 Series a New Generation of Flexible Color Displays [advertisement]

    Page(s): 55
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  • Everything the Draftsman Loves About 1000H Goes Double for the Plotter [advertisement]

    Page(s): 56
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  • Managing geometric information with a database management system

    Page(s): 57 - 62
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    Current database management systems do not meet the needs of CAD/CAM users. Boeing's Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) project strikes at the heart of the problem-moving data across heterogeneous distributed systems. A fundamental goal of IPAD is increased industrial productivity. The key to this increase is the concept of integration. The project does not pursue new advances in geometry or graphics, but focuses on the problem of managing information flow in the engineering/manufacturing environment. The creation and use of effective tools for this purpose will reduce the manual intervention in the data flow, speed up the interactions in the process, and make the information more readily available to those who need it. View full abstract»

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  • Proceedings - Second Annual Phoenix Conference on Computers and Communications March 14-16, 1983

    Page(s): 61
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa