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NanoBioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 2006

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): C2
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  • Guest Editorial Special Section on Colloidal Quantum Dots for Biomedical Applications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 221
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  • Synthesizing Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles to Image Cell Signaling Pathways

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 222 - 230
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5357 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This minireview outlines the synthetic efforts, from our research group, to produce nanomaterials for use as imaging agents to study cell signaling pathways. An overview of our approach to the synthesis and biofunctionalization of metal, semiconductor, and ceramic nanomaterials is presented. The probes investigated include coinage metals, Cd-based, Gedeg, naturally occurring fluorescent (NOF) minerals, and Ln-based nanoparticles which were synthesized from novel metal alkoxide, amide, and alkyl precursors. We illustrate the applications of some of these materials as imaging probes to detect signaling pathway components and cellular responses to signals (apoptosis and degranulation) in inflammatory and cancer cells View full abstract»

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  • Peptide coated quantum dots for biological applications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 231 - 238
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    Notice of Violation of IEEE Publication Principles

    After careful and considered review of the content and authorship of this paper by a duly constituted expert committee, this paper has been found to be in violation of IEEE's Publication Principles.

    The first paragraph of this paper contains significant portions of original text from the paper cited below. The original text was copied without attribution (including appropriate references to the original author(s) and/or paper title) and without permission.

    "Identification and Characterization of Cu2O- and ZnO-Binding Polypeptides by Escherichia coli Cell Surface Display: Toward an Understanding of Metal Oxide Binding"

    by Thai et al. published in BIOTECHNOLOGY AND BIOENGINEERING, volume 87, issue 2 on pages 129- 137 (DOI: 10.1002/bit.20149)

    The first author, Gopal Iyer, expresses his deep and sincere regrets to Corrine K. Thai, Haixia Dai, M.S.R. Sastry, Mehmet Sarikaya, Daniel T. Schwartz and Fran??ois Baneyx, his own coauthors who were unaware of this violation of publication principles, and the readers of this article.Quantum dots (QDOTs) have been widely recognized by the scientific community and the biotechnology industry, as witnessed by the exponential growth of this field in the past several years. We describe the synthesis and characterization of visible and near infrared QDots-a critical step for engineering organic molecules like proteins and peptides for building nanocomposite materials with multifunctional properties suitable for biological applications View full abstract»

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  • Polymerization of Nanocrystal Quantum Dot–Tubulin Bioconjugates

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 239 - 245
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (677 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD)-tubulin bioconjugates were prepared using a two-step crosslinking procedure. NQD-decorated microtubules were successfully polymerized directly from the NQD-tubulin conjugates to form nonaggregated, full-length (several micrometers) biopolymers. However, polymerization kinetics were slowed in comparison with unmodified tubulin and tubulin modified with small-molecule dyes or biotin. Association with the relatively large nanocrystals, therefore, interferes to some extent with tubulin's ability to polymerize. These results suggest that before NQDs are used extensively as fluorescent labels in studies of biomolecular activity, the impact of NQD bioconjugation must be well understood View full abstract»

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  • Detecting Single Quantum Dot Motion With Nanometer Resolution for Applications in Cell Biology

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 246 - 250
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (517 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Quantum dots (QDs), semiconductor particles of nanometer dimension, have emerged as excellent fluorescent analogs in tracer experiments with single molecule sensitivity for bioassays. Cell imaging greatly benefits from the remarkable optical and physical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals: QDs are much brighter and exhibit a higher resistance to photobleaching than traditional fluorophores, and their narrow emission spectrum and flexible surface chemistry make them particularly suitable for multiplex imaging. Here, we have demonstrated the achievement of a nanometer spatial resolution on the position of a single QD in a simple optomechanical instrument using a high-sensitivity low-noise detector, an intensified CCD camera. Furthermore, nanometer variations in the amplitude of a QD's sinusoidal oscillations could be quantitatively distinguished after fast Fourier transform (FFT) based data processing. As confirmed by experiments where QDs were attached to the surface of bovine aortic endothelial cells, this method can be exploited in biology to assess molecular and subcellular contributions to responses such as motility, intracellular trafficking, and mechanotransduction, with high resolution and minimal disturbance to cells View full abstract»

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  • Tissue and Species Differences in the Application of Quantum Dots as Probes for Biomolecular Targets in the Inner Ear and Kidney

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 251 - 262
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5517 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Quantum dots (QDs) are useful biological probes because of the increased photostability and quantum efficiency they offer over organic fluorophores. However, toxicity concerns arise because the QD core is composed of cadmium and selenium, metals known to be unsafe for humans and animals. We investigated the feasibility of quantum dots as biological labels for imaging studies of inner ear and kidney, tissues that share a polarized epithelial arrangement and drug susceptibility. We found that methods for labeling the actin cytoskeleton of monolayers of cultured amphibian kidney cells (Xenopus A6) with 565 nm QD conjugates were not feasible with large Xenopus inner ear organs. We then compared the uptake of 565 nm cationic peptide-targeted and nontargeted QDs in live kidney cell lines (amphibian, A6 and XLK-WG; human, HEK-293). Results showed that targeted QDs are internalized by all three kidney cell lines, and that nontargeted CdSe nanocrystals are sequestered only by human kidney cells. CellTracker Red CMTPX confirmed the membrane integrity and viability of HEK-293 cells that internalized QDs. Our results demonstrate species and tissue differences in QD uptake and labeling, and underscore the need for long-term studies of QD toxicity and fate in cells View full abstract»

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  • Quantum Dot as a Drug Tracer In Vivo

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 263 - 267
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (243 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been applied to a wide range of biological studies by taking advantage of their fluorescence properties. There is almost no method to trace small molecules including medicine. Here, we used QDs for fluorescent tracers for medicine and analyzed their kinetics and dynamics. We conjugated QDs with captopril, anti-hypertensive medicine, by an exchange reaction while retaining the medicinal properties. We investigated the medicinal effect of QD-conjugated captopril (QD-cap) in vitro and in vivo. We also evaluated the concentration and the distribution of the QD-cap in the blood and the organs with their fluorescence. We demonstrate that the QD-cap inhibits the activity of ACE in vitro. The QD-cap reduced the blood pressure of hypertensive model rats. The concentration of the QD-cap in the blood was measured by using the standard curve of the fluorescence intensity. The blood concentration of the QD-cap decrease exponentially and QD-cap has approximately the same half-life as that of captopril. In addition, the fluorescence of the QDs revealed that QD-cap accumulates in the liver, lungs, and spleen. We succeeded in analyzing the dynamics and kinetics of small molecules using fluorescence of QDs View full abstract»

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  • Quantum Dot Probes for Monitoring Dynamic Cellular Response: Reporters of T Cell Activation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 268 - 272
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (529 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Antibody-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) have been used to map the expression dynamics of the cytokine receptor interleukin-2 receptor-alpha (IL-2Ralpha) following Jurkat T cell activation. Maximal receptor expression was observed 48 h after activation, followed by a sharp decrease consistent with IL-2R internalization subsequent to IL-2 engagement. Verification of T cell activation and specificity of QD labeling were demonstrated using fluorescence microscopy, ELISA, and FACS analyses. These antibody conjugates provide a versatile means to rapidly determine cell state and interrogate membrane associated proteins involved in cell signaling pathways. Ultimately, incorporation with a microfluidic platform capable of simultaneously monitoring several cell signaling pathways will aid in toxin detection and discrimination View full abstract»

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  • Nano- and Microscale Holes Modulate Cell-Substrate Adhesion, Cytoskeletal Organization, and -\beta 1 Integrin Localization in Sv40 Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 273 - 280
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    Human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) interface with a basement membrane in vivo that possesses complex nanoscale topographic features. We report that synthetic substrates patterned with nano- and microscale holes differentially modulate the proliferation, shape and adhesion of SV40 human corneal epithelial cells (SV40-HCECs) as a function of feature size: 1) Cell proliferation was inhibited on nanoscale features (features size less than 800 nm in pitch) compared to microscale features or planar substrates in identical culture conditions. 2)Cells on nanoscale holes had a stellate morphology compared to those on microscale features that were more evenly spread. 3) Cells adhered more to nanoscale features than to microscale features when exposed to shear stress in a laminar flow chamber. Transmission electron microscopy showed that cells cultured on the 400 nm pitch patterns had longer and more numerous filopodia and retraction fibers than cells cultured on the 1600 nm pitch patterns. Immunogold labeling of -beta1 integrins revealed that these receptors were localized at the cell periphery and in the aforementioned cytoskeletal elements. Our findings indicate that surface discontinuities and the activation of mechanochemical cell signaling mechanisms may contribute to the observed responses exhibited by SV40-HCECs cultured on nano- and microscale topography View full abstract»

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  • All-Optical Switching in Plant Blue Light Photoreceptor Phototropin

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 281 - 287
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (354 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We theoretically analyze all-optical switching in the recently characterized LOV2 domain from Avena sativa (oat) phot1 phototropin, a blue-light plant photoreceptor, based on nonlinear intensity-induced excited-state absorption. The transmission of a cw probe laser beam at 660 nm corresponding to the peak absorption of the first excited L-state, through the LOV2 sample, is switched by a pulsed pump laser beam at 442 nm that corresponds to the maximum initial D state absorption. The switching characteristics have been analyzed using the rate equation approach, considering all the three intermediate states and transitions in the LOV2 photocycle. It is shown that for a given pump pulse intensity, there is an optimum pump pulsewidth for which the switching contrast is maximum. It is shown that the probe laser beam can be completely switched off (100% modulation) by the pump laser beam at 50 kW/cm2 for a concentration of 1 mM with sample thickness of 5.5 mm. The switching characteristics are sensitive to various parameters such as concentration, rate constant of L-state, peak pump intensity and pump pulse width. At typical values, the switch-off and switch-on time is 1.6 and 22.3 mus, respectively. The switching characteristics have also been used to design all-optical not and the universal nor and nand logic gates View full abstract»

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  • Grid-Enabled High-Throughput In Silico Screening Against Influenza A Neuraminidase

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 288 - 295
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (986 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Encouraged by the success of the first EGEE biomedical data challenge against malaria (WISDOM) , the second data challenge battling avian flu was kicked off in April 2006 to identify new drugs for the potential variants of the influenza A virus. Mobilizing thousands of CPUs on the Grid, the six-week-long high-throughput screening activity has fulfilled over 100 CPU years of computing power and produced around 600 gigabytes of results on the Grid for further biological analysis and testing. In the paper, we demonstrate the impact of a worldwide Grid infrastructure to efficiently deploy large-scale virtual screening to speed up the drug design process. Lessons learned through the data challenge activity are also discussed View full abstract»

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  • Search for Editor-in-Chief

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 296
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  • 2006 Index

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 297 - 303
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  • The 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 304
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): C3
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  • Blank page [back cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publishes basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, modeling and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to molecules, cells, tissues. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Henry Hess
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Columbia University