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Software, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 29
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Article summaries

    Page(s): 4
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  • Giving Back

    Page(s): 5 - 7
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  • Letters

    Page(s): 8 - 11
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  • The Gatekeeper's Guide, or How to Kill a Tool

    Page(s): 12 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (367 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the past few decades, new tools that facilitate the cost-effective production of high-quality software have slowly gained ground. The following guidelines show how you can push any tool to the side, perpetuating the manual methods that have always worked in the past View full abstract»

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  • Goodness of Fit

    Page(s): 14 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It appears to be with software architectures: for a given domain, even across the decades, forces are at play that are best resolved by a common architectural pattern that allows variants. One architectural style might be deemed "better" than another for that domain because it better resolves those forces. In that sense, there's a goodness of fit - not necessarily a perfect fit, but good enough View full abstract»

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  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Software Engineering Curriculum Development

    Page(s): 16 - 18
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    The first software engineering programs were at the graduate level, primarily as terminal master's degrees for those already developing commercial and industrial software. By the early 1990s, educators began to consider software engineering's role at the undergraduate level. This special issue's articles reflect the common foundations of both baccalaureate and master's programs as well as diverse approaches to teaching software engineering. This article is part of a special issue on Software Engineering Curriculum Development. View full abstract»

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  • SE2004: Recommendations for Undergraduate Software Engineering Curricula

    Page(s): 19 - 25
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    Universities throughout the world have established undergraduate programs in software engineering, which complement existing programs in computer science and computer engineering. To provide guidance in designing an effective curriculum, the IEEE Computer Society and the ACM have developed the Software Engineering 2004 (SE2004) set of recommendations. The SE2004 document guides universities and colleges regarding the knowledge they should teach in undergraduate software engineering programs. It also provides sample courses and curriculum patterns. SE2004 begins with an overview of software engineering, explaining how it is both a computing and an engineering discipline. It then outlines the principles that drove the document's development and describes expected student outcomes. Next, SE2004 details the knowledge that universities and colleges should teach, known as SEEK (software engineering education knowledge), in a software engineering program. These recommendations are followed by general pedagogical guidelines, sample courses, and sample curriculum patterns View full abstract»

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  • Computer Society Information

    Page(s): 26
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  • Creating an Accreditable Software Engineering Bachelor's Program

    Page(s): 27 - 35
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    Since 1936, the accreditation of undergraduate engineering programs has been a cornerstone of modern engineering practice. Accreditation validates that an engineering program serves its constituents and the public well. In an emerging discipline such as software engineering, accreditation standards also serve as a target - a source of requirements for validating an SE program's design. Accreditation standards also help ensure that a program's graduates will meet or exceed national and international standards expected of the Bachelor of Science graduate. A small university's BSSE program grew out of several requirements sources and accreditation expectations. The planners developed effective design processes and a model curriculum View full abstract»

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  • Learning Software Engineering at a Distance

    Page(s): 36 - 43
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    Delivering a software engineering curriculum by distance learning requires innovative and flexible approaches to presenting and managing the learning materials. At the Open University, we've been offering a broadly based master's degree in Computing for Commerce and Industry by distance learning for over 20 years. The Open University's SE curriculum and delivery mechanisms are shaped by its commitment to offering professionally accredited part-time, open, and large-scale distance learning primarily aimed at IT practitioners View full abstract»

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  • Experiences with Open Source Software Engineering Tools

    Page(s): 44 - 52
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    For software engineering (SE) and computer science (CS) programs to deliver on their promises, they must go beyond teaching students about principles, processes, models, and strategies and offer them realistic, practical experience as well. Although industry has been pressing to increase the emphasis on practical aspects, many CS programs continue to give students relatively simple problems focused on selected computing and software concepts and theories. Open source software offers CS and SE educators an opportunity to give their students practical, hands-on software engineering experience View full abstract»

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  • A Model Curriculum for Aspect-Oriented Software Development

    Page(s): 53 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (202 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As new software engineering techniques emerge, there's a cognitive shift in how developers approach a problem's analysis and how they design and implement its software-based solution. Future software engineers must be appropriately and effectively trained in new techniques' fundamentals and applications. With techniques becoming more mature, such training moves beyond specialized industrial courses into postgraduate curricula (as advanced topics) and subsequently into undergraduate curricula. A model curriculum for aspect-oriented software development provides guidelines about fundamentals, a common framework, and a step toward developing a body of knowledge View full abstract»

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  • SOAP and Web Services

    Page(s): 62 - 67
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    Interest in Web services has increased rapidly since their first appearance a few years ago. They are a key value-added feature of today's Internet, making it feasible to combine different applications and so generate new services based on existing applications. Feasibility, however, doesn't mean easy connectivity to all we can see and use on the Internet - in terms of either usability or software integration. The author introduces Web services and how to use SOAP to assemble such services. He presents an example built from scratch, lessons learned along the way, and a comparison of various SOAP implementation states of practice View full abstract»

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  • Improve Your Requirements: Quantify Them

    Page(s): 68 - 69
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    One of the biggest challenges requirements analysts face is quantifying requirements. Analysts frequently ask how to do this, what techniques support it, and most importantly, where the numbers come from. Alas, quantifying your requirements is more easily said than done. Most people would say that it shows that the software complies with the requirements - that it's sufficiently fast, reliable, usable, and so forth. No doubt this is important, but showing compliance supports downstream development rather than the requirements process itself. However, quantification is also integral to challenging, and thus improving, requirements during your requirements process. Successful quantification can motivate people to find ways to deliver on these requirements by giving them clear targets to work toward. Although quantifying requirements can be difficult, several techniques can help. The author discusses two such techniques - Volere and Planguage View full abstract»

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  • Driving Software Quality: How Test-Driven Development Impacts Software Quality

    Page(s): 70 - 71
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (117 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Recently, software development teams using agile processes have started widely adopting test-driven development. Despite its name, "test driven" or "test first" development isn't really a testing technique. Also known as test-driven design, TDD works like this: For each small bit of functionality the programmers code, they first write unit tests. Then they write the code that makes those unit tests pass. This forces the programmer to think about many aspects of the feature before coding it. It also provides a safety net of tests that the programmers can run with each update to the code, ensuring that refactored, updated, or new code doesn't break existing functionality View full abstract»

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  • In Search of What We Experimentally Know about Unit Testing

    Page(s): 72 - 80
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    Gathering evidence in any discipline is a lengthy procedure, requiring experimentation and empirical confirmation to transform information from mere opinion to undisputed fact. Software engineering is a relatively young field and experimental SE is even younger, so undisputed facts are few and far between. Nevertheless, ESE's relevance is growing because experimental results can help practitioners make better decisions. We have aggregated results from unit-testing experiments with the aim of identifying information with some experimental basis that might help practitioners make decisions. Most of the experiments focus on two important characteristics of testing techniques: effectiveness and efficiency. Some other experiments study the quality of test-case sets according to different criteria View full abstract»

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  • Are CMM Program Investments Beneficial? Analyzing Past Studies

    Page(s): 81 - 87
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    CMM experts strongly believe that investments in programs promoting an organization's CMM maturity yield substantial organizational and economic benefits. In particular, they argue that CMM programs that implement software process improvements can provide more benefits View full abstract»

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  • A Model for Technology Transfer in Practice

    Page(s): 88 - 95
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    Technology transfer, and thus industry-relevant research, involves more than merely producing research results and delivering them in publications and technical reports. It demands close cooperation and collaboration between industry and academia throughout the entire research process. During research conducted in a partnership between Blekinge Institute of Technology and two companies, Danaher Motion Saro AB (DHR) and ABB, we devised a technology transfer model that embodies this philosophy. We initiated this partnership to conduct industry-relevant research in requirements engineering and product management. Technology transfer in this context is a prerequisite: it validates academic research results in a real setting, and it provides a way to improve industry development and business processes View full abstract»

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  • Explaining Your Design

    Page(s): 96 - 98
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    Have you ever tried to explain some aspect of your design and not known where to start? Perhaps you had to present how you solved a problem or justify your chosen design among several alternatives, and you weren't sure how to highlight key design aspects critical in achieving a certain requirement. Design decisions with widespread impact or design nuances that might confuse new team members can benefit from good definitions and narrative explanations. When fellow designers repeatedly ask, "why did you do it that way?" It's good to have an effective presentation that explains the tricky parts of your design without losing people in the details View full abstract»

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  • In the News

    Page(s): 99 - 103
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  • Bookshelf

    Page(s): 104 - 105
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Forrest Shull
Fraunhofer Center for Experimental Software Engineering