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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 25
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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  • IEEE Internet Computing--Call for Papers

    Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • From the Editor in Chief: Define--Valedictory

    Page(s): 4 - 7
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  • VoIP Security Gets More Visible

    Page(s): 8 - 10
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  • IEEE Distributed Systems Online - Information

    Page(s): 11
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  • From the Newsstand

    Page(s): 12 - 15
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  • Reliable Asynchronous Message Delivery for Mobile Agents

    Page(s): 16 - 25
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    Agents' mobility makes it difficult for them to deliver messages reliably, but a new system could change that. To asynchronously deliver messages to a mobile agent, the reliable asynchronous message delivery (RAMD) protocol places a "blackboard" in each region server for sharing information. RAMD also relates message delivery with a mobile agent's migration, thus addressing the tracking and message-delivery problems' View full abstract»

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  • Increasing MOM Flexibility with Portable Rule Bases

    Page(s): 26 - 32
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    Message-oriented middleware (MOM) provides an effective integration mechanism for distributed systems, but it must change frequently to adapt to evolving business demands. Content-based routing (CBR) can increase the flexibility of MOM-based deployments. Although centralized CBR improves a messaging solution's maintainability, it limits scalability and robustness. This article proposes an alternative, decentralized approach to CBR that uses a portable rule base to maximize MOM-based deployments' maintainability, scalability, and robustness View full abstract»

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  • A Multilayer Peer-to-Peer Framework for Distributed Synchronous Collaboration

    Page(s): 33 - 41
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    Although interest in Web-based multiuser interaction is growing, classical server-based multiuser systems are becoming saturated. Consequently, the peer-to-peer (P2P) paradigm is receiving significant attention as an alternative. The authors propose a multilayer P2P framework for developing distributed synchronous collaborative systems using asynchronous P2P platforms. They've used the framework to develop a shared Web browser using the Java programming language and the JXTA platform View full abstract»

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  • Concurrent Multiple-Issue Negotiation for Internet-Based Services

    Page(s): 42 - 49
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    Negotiation is a technique for reaching a mutually beneficial agreement among autonomous entities. In an Internet-based services context, multiple entities are negotiating simultaneously. The concurrent negotiation protocol extends existing negotiation protocols, letting both service requestors and service providers manage several negotiation processes in parallel. Colored Petri nets, which have greater expressive power than finite state machines and offer support for concurrency, represent the negotiation protocol and facilitate the analysis of desirable properties View full abstract»

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  • Proactive DAD: A Fast Address-Acquisition Strategy for Mobile IPv6 Networks

    Page(s): 50 - 55
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    The increasing number of Wi-Fi-compatible mobile devices highlights various wireless access challenges, including the need for smooth hand offs between Internet attachment points in mobile IPv6 networks. To confirm address uniqueness in a new domain, mobile nodes must run duplicate address detection (DAD), which is a time-consuming process. The Proactive DAD approach uses topology information and layer-2 signals to predict the new network domains prior to or in parallel with layer-3 hand offs. Experimental results show that P-DAD can significantly reduce both hand-off latency and packet loss View full abstract»

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  • Automatic Integrity Checks for Remote Web Resources

    Page(s): 56 - 62
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    Existing tools for automatically detecting Web site defacement compare monitored Web resources with uncorrupted copies of the content kept in a safe place. This can be an expensive and difficult task, especially when working with dynamic resources. In contrast, the Goldrake tool uses sensors and alarms to automatically monitor remote Web resources' integrity. Such a framework could help designers build services to inexpensively monitor multiple Web sites, which could be very attractive for small, budget-limited organizations that depend on the Web for their operation View full abstract»

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  • SEOnline Software Engineering Online Information [advertisement]

    Page(s): 63
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  • E-Governance in Antarctica: Internet Technology's Role in Administering a Global Commons

    Page(s): 64 - 68
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    Internet technology is enabling the governance of geographic areas that were once considered beyond human control. Nowhere on Earth is this more evident than in Antarctica, which is a global commons currently governed under the terms of the Antarctic Treaty. With current concerns over global warming and Antarctica's importance as an environmental barometer, the use of Internet technology is increasingly important to assure that this last frontier is monitored and governed for the greater good View full abstract»

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  • Shopbots: A Syntactic Present, A Semantic Future

    Page(s): 69 - 75
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    Despite high expectations, shopbots have yet to significantly facilitate a richer, more satisfying online shopping experience for users. By taking advantage of semantic Web and Web services technologies, however, researchers can overcome current technological limitations and finally realize the shopbot's significant potential View full abstract»

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  • The Shortest Path to the Future Web

    Page(s): 76 - 79
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    This column's title could suggest that there is only one best path forward for the Web. The path begins with document metadata and travels through the world of microformats and embedded data. A waypoint is a semantic Web that leverages these approaches, along with those offered by an environment more capable of managing first-class data directly. This is only one path, however, and it probably isn't the shortest. The Internet is a rich environment with billions of active agents. Natural selection, mutation, and genetic breeding of sorts all happen to software systems, together with a significantly higher proportion of "intelligent design" than found in the real world. The net effect is that many different evolutionary paths are being explored simultaneously, and several could lead to a better Web View full abstract»

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  • Usability Testing: A Journey, Not a Destination

    Page(s): 80 - 83
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    Usability testing for interfaces can fit into a design project in several ways. The author looks at how good testing techniques can make projects run better and faster, and produce an improved result. The primary point is that there's no incompatibility between usability testing and a rational product process. We can think of usability testing as simply another aspect of quality assurance, and can fold it into the product process in much the same way as software quality assurance (QA). By having usability people involved from the beginning, big problems get found earlier, and small problems get found in time. The fear of losing control of a project to a usability person who finds a last-minute interface design problem is therefore a red herring. You can indeed find usability problems that might affect project completion late in the development process, just like you can find system architecture problems. But the way to keep this from happening is to test your system and your ideas during each stage of development, gathering the kind of information you need at each of those stages. That's why usability testing is a journey, not a destination View full abstract»

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  • In Search of Manageable Identity Systems

    Page(s): 84 - 86
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    Efforts to design and successfully deploy network-based identity-management systems have been unsuccessful. One possible new approach is visible when comparing Internet identity protocol designs with systems used in financial services. Keeping the risks in mind, we should embrace systems that help reduce the uncertainty associated with online transactions. Neither the composite nor unitary approach yield a perfectly secure or reliable system, but Internet and Web system designers can learn a lot from the former. Not only has it proven itself in large-scale systems, but it's also more true to the way we think of identity in human terms. Interpersonal interactions involve assessing identity assertions' reliability according to numerous subtle factors, rather than applying a mechanical checklist. Adopting a more composite approach to identity lets us build systems that provide great reliability and flexibility in the inherently complex process of assessing whether we can trust the identities of those we deal with online View full abstract»

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  • Advanced Message Queuing Protocol

    Page(s): 87 - 89
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    The advanced message queuing protocol (AMQP) working group's goal is to create an open standard for an interoperable enterprise-scale asynchronous messaging protocol. AMQP is finally addressing the lack of enterprise messaging interoperability standards. This relatively simple yet compellingly powerful enterprise messaging protocol is thus poised to open up a bright new era for enterprise messaging View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Internet Computing 2006 Annual Index, Volume 10

    Page(s): 90 - 95
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  • Out of Context

    Page(s): 96
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  • Silver Bullet Security Podcast Series [advertisement]

    Page(s): c3
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  • IEEE Internet Computing 2007 Editorial Calendar

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University