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IEE Review

Issue 7 • Date July-August 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 4 of 4
  • The hottest technology under the sun (Expo '92)

    Page(s): 251 - 253
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)  

    The author gives a brief overview of Expo '92 being held in Seville, Spain. The author briefly discusses the techniques used to reduce temperatures at the site including shade, vegetation and water. In particular the author discusses the bioclimatic sphere which creates a localised cloud of water droplets. Also discussed are water walls, including the solar powered example at the British Pavilion. A brief overview of the British Pavilion is given. The site infrastructure including power supply facilities are discussed. The launch of Hispasat, the first Spanish telecommunications satellite is discussed as is the use of smart cards and fingerprint readers by workers to gain access to the site.<> View full abstract»

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  • DECT-beyond CT2

    Page(s): 263 - 267
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB)  

    Within Europe there are two standards for digital cordless telephony: CT2 and DECT (Digital European Cordless Telephony). The author traces the origins of both standards and compares their features, services and facilities. The author then looks at DECT in more detail discussing the service principles, network access and protocol architecture. The author then discusses the complementary roles of CT2 and DECT.<> View full abstract»

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  • Silicon that moves-towards the smart sensor

    Page(s): 268 - 269
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (177 KB)  

    The author describes an electronic accelerometer based on capacitive measurement. It is based on the simple parallel-plate capacitor: one plate is fixed, while the other moves relative to it under acceleration, which causes the capacitance to change. One example of this approach is the Analog Devices ADXL-50, manufactured by surface micromachining. The ADXL 50 consists of a variable differential air capacitor whose plates are etched from a single 2 mu m piece of silicon. The fixed plates are simple cantilever beams, supported 1 mu m above the chip in free space by polysilicon anchors that form a molecular bond with the chip. The thicker central mass is free to move in a plane perpendicular to the tethers. A series of regular fine elements project from the central mass, each acting as a parallel-plate capacitor. As capacitance is inversely proportional to the distance between the plates, the device has been designed to have the finest gap possible using photolithographic machines, to give the largest possible signal. The operation of the device is briefly discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Occam and the art of microwave maintenance-software architecture of a transputer-based instrument

    Page(s): 275 - 279
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (403 KB)  

    There are many ways in which the control software for an instrument could be realised. The approach described was developed over a number of years by the Microwave Measurements Group at Marconi Instruments, and used in its most recent product, the 6200 series Microwave Test Set (MTS). The MTS is a new type of instrument, combining the functionality of a four-input scalar network analyser, a synthesised microwave source, a power meter and a frequency counter. It is also the first test and measurement instrument to use transputers. The author briefly describes the MTS and then describes a general-purpose instrument software architecture developed to assist in design of a complex instrument such as the MTS. The author discusses the Occam model, the design of the measurement subsystem and its operational parameters, and the realisation of the system architecture.<> View full abstract»

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