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Engineering Management Journal

Issue 3 • Date Jun 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • The importance of teamwork in industry

    Page(s): 104 - 108
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    The author discusses Dr. Stan Jones' career which has been varied ranging from electronics, to power engineering, to software engineering, in both the UK and the USA, and nearly always with management responsibility. Some of the management lessons he has learned over the years, including the need to give good engineers overall responsibility for projects at an early age, are discussed. The partnership between employer and employee is discussed View full abstract»

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  • Designing for profit

    Page(s): 137 - 144
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    Product design and development is a key element of the product creation process which embraces design, engineering, marketing, manufacturing and financial skills. While the principles discussed are intended to be universal in their application, the author focuses on recommended practice for the small-to-medium size enterprise (SME) with up to 500 employees. The content draws from the experience of both independent businesses and the subsidiaries of public companies View full abstract»

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  • Product revitalisation

    Page(s): 145 - 151
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    Many companies exclusively develop brand new products-they never try to upgrade existing ones. Evidence from the Far East indicates that alternative approaches may be more successful. The author explores ways in which `revitalising' products can be a cost-effective route to market success. The author describes the evolutionary approach to product development adopted in Japan and then discusses a type of incremental product developments-revitalisation. Barriers to the technique are also discussed. The three main steps in revitalisation are then discussed View full abstract»

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  • How to write right

    Page(s): 111 - 115
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    Writing is an essential skill on which all engineers and managers rely. The author outlines simple design principles for engineering's predominant product: paper. Five principles are given to aid in writing a document: establish the aim; consider the reader; devise the structure; draft the text; and edit and revise View full abstract»

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  • An approach to improving management performance. II. Knowledge-the fabric of understanding

    Page(s): 123 - 130
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB)  

    For pt.I see ibid., vol.3, no.2, p.63 (1992). The author continues a review of the origins of scientific management and traces the history which has led to the concepts and attitudes required in managing for quality today. Leading figures in the history of technology are quoted, as the quality theme is developed from its 17th century origins to the present day. A practical, simple technique is described to help engineers powerfully contribute to the quality revolution and the continuous improvement of all organisational processes View full abstract»

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  • Human resource management: the key to competitive advantage

    Page(s): 116 - 120
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)  

    Within recent years human resource management (HRM) has assumed considerable importance in the management of organisations. Many firms have been implementing HRM strategies, and the claim is often made that they are spending more on the development of their human resources than ever before. In a rapidly changing and competitive environment HRM is seen as a strategic factor in influencing not only the success of companies, but also that of nations. The author briefly discusses the nature and purpose of HRM and a framework for its analysis. A case study of its application to an engineering company employing 3500 people is discussed View full abstract»

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  • Ten ways to mismanage product design

    Page(s): 131 - 136
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)  

    The Design Council and the BSI were asked to prepare a Standard on how to manage design. After almost four years BS7000 was published in 1989. Many of the mistakes in managing product design occur in all industrial sectors and in all sizes of company. Examining such mistakes is usually more instructive than promoting individual successes. Ten common types of mistake are featured. Based on BS7000 the author comments on how design should be managed, compared to the ten mistakes View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Engineering Management magazine covers management methods, techniques and processes relevant to engineers, incorporating project management, marketing, finance, law, quality and responsibilities of the engineer in society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dickon Ross
IET