By Topic

Circuits and Devices Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July 1991

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • SPICE macro model for the simulation of zener diode I-V characteristics

    Page(s): 9 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  

    The problems encountered when using the existing SPICE diode model to represent the I-V characteristics of a Zener diode in the reverse region are examined. A Zener diode macro model that has accurate I-V simulation characteristics and can be easily constructed using SPICE-provided primitives is presented. The static I-V characteristics and temperature response of the diode are reviewed. The performance of the model is discussed, and its main enhancements as compared to the SPICE model are identified.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Technology for the 1990s

    Page(s): 13 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (702 KB)  

    A forecast of the practical and promising devices, circuits, and systems that can be expected in the next one to five years is presented. It is based on a survey of a group of distinguished practitioners throughout the industry. The forecasts cover the areas of lasers and electrooptics, integrated optoelectronics, electron devices, digital integrated circuits, high-frequency and microwave devices, VLSI signal and image processing systems, analog ICs and signal processing, power electronics and systems, neural systems and applications, and medical image and signal processing. A particularly optimistic outlook is seen for lasers, fiber optics, optoelectronic ICs, and optical switching and processing. Digital ICs and power electronics are also expected to make steady gains. In addition, flat panel displays will attract a fair amount of activity, with the liquid-crystal and electroluminescent types emerging as the leaders in this decade. Looking further out, advances in artificial and biological neural systems represents a natural extension to more sophisticated problem-solving in speech processing, vision and communications.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Smart-power devices seek wiser CAE tools

    Page(s): 20 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (746 KB)  

    The difficulties in developing generalized computer design tools for smart-power semiconductor electronics, a highly specialized field requiring a mix of analog and digital integrated-circuit design, unique semiconductor-device-fabrication technology, and knowledge of application-specific power systems, are examined. These include the problem of dealing with the double-diffused MOS (DMOS) transistor, as well as the simulation of trench refill processes, 2D oxidation phenomena and their stress-induced effects on avalanche breakdown, and the 3D diffusion of the spherical junctions encountered in high-voltage termination. The complexities associated with 2D simulations are discussed in some detail. Dealing with asymmetric devices and with structures consisting of circles, arcs, and 45 degrees angles is also considered.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Laser post-ionization improves surface analysis

    Page(s): 27 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (779 KB)  

    Laser post-ionization (PI), a technique that overcomes the greatest handicap of secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), namely, its susceptibility to matrix effects is discussed. The SIMS matrix effect is the often unknown relationship between the chemical composition of a solid and the secondary ion yield of an analyte in the sample, which is unpredictable and can vary as much as seven orders of magnitude. PI, which involves passing a laser beam parallel to, and just above, a surface undergoing stimulated desorption, solves the problem by decoupling the ionization and desorption steps. This allows the detection of secondary neutral species, which typically constitute more than 95% of the material removed from the surface during ion beam sputtering. This largely eliminates matrix effects because the chemical matrix generally has much less influence on the emission of charged particles. To compete with SIMS on sensitivity, PI methods efficiently ionize sputtered neutrals and detect those positionized particles. The nonresonant method of PI, which comes in two variations, nonresonant multiphoton and nonresonant single-photon ionization and is called SALI (surface analysis by laser ionization), is described, and its application to semiconductors is examined.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Micro-automating semiconductor fabrication

    Page(s): 32 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (606 KB)  

    Progress in automating very-small-scale mechanical processes is reviewed. The special requirements of microautomation are identified, and three applications are examined. They are positioning, electrical probing, and mechanical probing. The architecture and design of a microautomation system are described. Microsensors and microactuators are discussed. The use of magnetics technology for driving the microautomation system is reported, and a precision workspace for demonstrating a microautomation system is described. Also described are a coarse/fine positioner and a linear transport path capable of moving the fine manipulator from one precision-demanding area to another.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Designer's casebook-a simple one-shot multivibrator

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (129 KB)  

    The design and operation of a simple one-shot multivibrator are described. The circuit can be triggered by a shot positive pulse, using a pushbutton switch.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Circuits and Devices Magazine (1985-2006) covers the design, implementation, packaging, and manufacture of micro-electronic and photonic devices, circuits and systems

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2006.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dr. Ronald W. Waynant
r.waynant@ieee.org