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Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date Oct. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science publication information

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  • Beam Line Design, Beam Alignment Procedure, and Initial Results for the W -Band Gain Experiment at Los Alamos

    Page(s): 2393 - 2403
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    A gain experiment was performed at Los Alamos using a 120-keV 2-A cylindrical electron beam with a ridged waveguide slow-wave structure at 94 GHz, demonstrating 22 dB of amplification through a traveling-wave interaction. The structure was planar with a gap of 0.75 mm and a length of 5 cm. The 2-A electron beam was confined in a 3.2-kG axial magnetic field, with roughly a 0.5-mm diameter. The electron beam was aligned along the magnetic axis of the solenoid by scribing out its cyclotron motion on a novel optical diagnostic using a procedure that depends on varying the solenoidal field strength. The transport through the structure was verified by letting the beam drill holes in a series of thin metallic foils before insertion of the structure View full abstract»

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  • Green's Function Simulation of Space–Charge Effects in Electron Beams

    Page(s): 2404 - 2413
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    In this paper, a new numerical model for space-charge forces in electron beams based on a Green's function approach is described. In this model, the beam is simulated by a series of rings with nonzero thickness and length. The space-charge force on a ring is found by summing over all the interactions with all the other rings, where each interaction force is integrated over the entire volume of each source rings. With proper beam initialization of the simulation parameters, the rings can perfectly form the electron beam, leading to a very smooth and accurate calculation of the space-charge fields. The space-charge fields calculated this way can be more accurate than those found with particle-in-cell (PIC) calculations. The fields can also be distributed onto a mesh, as in a PIC calculation, leading to equivalent accuracy with greatly reduced simulation times. The accuracy of this type of model is demonstrated by comparing the harmonic-current evolution from an RF gap for a transversely cold confined beam to analytic theory and we show its utility with a large-signal annular beam klystron simulation using this technique View full abstract»

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  • Schlieren Diagnostics of Fused Quartz Heated by Intense Ion Beams

    Page(s): 2414 - 2418
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    The thermodynamic response of matter heated with intense ion beams was analyzed using the schlieren technique. The energy deposition zone and the propagation of the thermal wave were visualized in the experiment. Fused quartz has been chosen as a target to investigate the phenomena in a material with high yield point. The temperature in the ion beam heated region was estimated using the schlieren data and by analysis of the material changes after irradiation View full abstract»

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  • Cathode Plasma Jet Pinching and Intense X-Ray Emission in a Moderate-Current Laser-Triggered Vacuum Discharge

    Page(s): 2419 - 2425
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    Occurrence of cathode plasma jet pinching and its dependence on anode-cathode separation (d=2-10 mm) in a moderate-current (~10 kA) low-energy (les 20 J) vacuum discharge is presented. Discharge was created between a planar titanium cathode and a conical point-tip titanium anode by producing plasma on the cathode using 27-ps-duration laser pulses. For d=2-3 mm, constricted flow of cathode plasma jet up to anode was observed along with multiple feeble local pinchings. A neck formation was observed for d=5-6 mm, whereas multiple pinching occurred for larger separations. Temporal profiles of the X-ray emission from the anode due to bombardment by electrons extracted from the expanding cathode plasma, for different anode-cathode separations, were consistent with the characteristics of cathode plasma jet pinching View full abstract»

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  • An Industrial Streamer Corona Plasma System for Gas Cleaning

    Page(s): 2426 - 2433
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    For pulsed corona plasma applications, it becomes important to develop pilot systems with large average power and high-energy conversion efficiency. Since the beginning of 2000, we have been working on an industrial corona plasma system with tasks of 10-30 kW in average power and higher than 90% of total energy conversion efficiency. The pulsed-power source should have the following specifications: rise time of 10-25 ns, pulsewidth of 50-150 ns, pulse repetition rate of up to 1000 pulses per second, peak voltage pulse of 70 kV, peak current of 3.5 kA, dc bias voltage of 10-35 kV, and energy per pulse of up to 30 J. Sixteen parallel wire cylinder reactors are used to match the source. Gas and reactor temperatures can be controlled individually with water flow around the outside of those cylinders. The system is designed for gaseous oxidation and electrostatic dust precipitation. The system has been used for up to 17 kW in average power. This paper reports the system in detail, discusses issues related to the matching between the source and the reactor, and presents an example of industrial demonstrations on odor abatement at 1000 m3/h. Finally, this paper also gives a general guideline for design of corona plasma systems View full abstract»

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  • Numerical Simulation of Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (MePIIID) on a Sharp Cone and a Fine Tip by a Multiple-Grid Particle-in-Cell (PIC) Method

    Page(s): 2434 - 2442
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    A multiple-grid particle-in-cell (PIC) method in r-z cylindrical coordinates is developed to study metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (MePIIID) of a sharp cone with a fine tip. At the boundary between the coarse and fine grids, the cells are subdivided into smaller regions so that the effective volume of each node does not overlap with each other when calculating the ion density from PIC weighting. In a previous paper, the ion dose, which is defined as the accumulated implanted ions per area, showed a sharp decrease near the cone tip [Cornet J. Appl. Phys., vol. 96, p. 6045, 2004]. However, the tip of the cone was described by only one single point. By applying a multiple-grid method to numerically simulate the MePIIID on a sharp cone with a fine tip, it is revealed that the highest dose is located at the center of the tip, and it is concluded that the sharp decrease in dose in a previous paper is an artifact of the single point. A multiple-grid system with three different cell sizes, i.e., 2, 1, and 0.5 mm, is used in the simulation. The tip of the cone is represented by a sphere in tangential contact with the edge of the cone View full abstract»

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  • Thin SiON Film Grown at Low Temperature (400 ^\circ\hbox {C} ) by Microwave-Excited High-Density \hbox {Kr/}\hbox {O}_{2/}\hbox {N}_{2} Plasma

    Page(s): 2443 - 2449
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    It is demonstrated that thin oxynitride (SiON) films can be grown on single crystal (100) silicon substrates at a growth temperature of 400 degC, yielding high-quality electrical insulating and reliability properties which are compatible with the IC industry requirements. This is a drastic reduction in the growth temperature with respect to thermally grown SiO2 films at 1000 degC, which are conventionally used in semiconductor device fabrications. The realization of this growth method is made through the employment of high-density Kr/O2/N2 microwave-excited (2.45 GHz) plasma techniques. It is found that the electrical properties of the oxynitride films are strongly affected by the amount of the N2 added to the process gas mixture. For a properly selected mixture, the characteristics of the plasma-grown oxynitride films are shown to exhibit clear advantages with respect to those of SiO2 gate insulator films, grown by a conventional dry oxidation at 1000 degC, presently used in the IC industry. They demonstrate higher charge-to-breakdown (QBD) values, lower stress-induced leakage currents, and significantly lower gate voltage shifts (DeltaV G). Accordingly, it is suggested that oxynitride films grown by the Kr/O2/N2 plasma technique are promising candidates for gate insulator films in scaled down MOS devices for the realization of future ultralarge-scale integration View full abstract»

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  • Magnetohydrodynamic Interaction in the Shock Layer of a Wedge in a Hypersonic Flow

    Page(s): 2450 - 2463
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    This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation on the effect of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interaction with the plasma of the shock layer at a test body in a hypersonic argon flow. The hypersonic flow is obtained from the high-enthalpy arc-heated wind tunnel of Alta, Pisa, Italy, on Mach 6. Tests are carried out at heating chamber stagnation pressures of 0.65, 0.85, and 1 bar and magnetic fields of 0.15-0.35 T. The experimental observations are done by means of a set of electrical probes, an optical multichannel analyzer, and a fast shutter charge-coupled device camera. In order to maximize the effect of MHD interaction, the Faraday field is shorted, and a magnetic field perpendicular to the test body surface is used. An increase of the distance between the shock front and the body, owing to the MHD interaction, is observed. The MHD interaction effect is reduced by the low conductivity of the plasma in the boundary layer at the test body surface View full abstract»

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  • Generation of Needle Injection Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    Page(s): 2464 - 2465
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    A description of a needle injection-plasma source at atmospheric pressure is presented in this paper. The needle injection plasma at atmospheric pressure is stabilized in a channel of a working gas flowing through a high-voltage electrode connected to an alternating current (ac) power supplier. Properties of the needle injection plasma from a preliminary investigation are presented View full abstract»

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  • Comments on “Initiation of Pulsed Corona Discharge Under Supercritical Conditions”

    Page(s): 2466
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    While the work of Lock et al. (2005) is interesting, there is a problem with Fig. 3 and the associated text. First, there can be no confident use of an extrapolation from results in the range 6-16 MPa-mum to results at 400 Mpa-mum. Second, there is no validity in plotting corona onset voltages against (pressure) times (electrode radius) and comparing them with breakdown voltages plotted against (pressure) times (electrode separation). Possible alternative experimental approaches that do not violate Paschen's law are suggested View full abstract»

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  • Reply on the Comments on “Initiation of Pulsed Corona Discharge Under Supercritical Conditions” by C. H. Zhang, J. M. K. MacAlpine, and H. Akiyama

    Page(s): 2467 - 2468
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    Generation of plasma under supercritical conditions is of fundamental and applied interest. In this paper, the reduced electric fields required for breakdown of gaseous and supercritical carbon dioxide are comparatively analyzed for planar and coaxial cylindrical geometries. The indirect comparison of measured breakdown voltages suggests an essential change in the ionization mechanism both for uniform and nonuniform fields View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • Affiliate Plan of the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Plasma Sciences focuses on plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology.

 

 

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Editor-in-Chief
Steven J. Gitomer, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, US Civilian Research & Development Foundation
Guest Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
1428 Miracerros Loop South
Santa Fe, NM  87505  87505  USA
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