Scheduled System Maintenance:
On Monday, April 27th, IEEE Xplore will undergo scheduled maintenance from 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM ET (17:00 - 19:00 UTC). No interruption in service is anticipated.
By Topic

Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2006

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (798 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (150 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial: Special Section on Visual Analytics

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1361 - 1362
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (93 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • High-Dimensional Visual Analytics: Interactive Exploration Guided by Pairwise Views of Point Distributions

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1363 - 1372
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2256 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We introduce a method for organizing multivariate displays and for guiding interactive exploration through high-dimensional data. The method is based on nine characterizations of the 2D distributions of orthogonal pairwise projections on a set of points in multidimensional Euclidean space. These characterizations include such measures as density, skewness, shape, outliers, and texture. Statistical analysis of these measures leads to ways for 1) organizing 2D scatterplots of points for coherent viewing, 2) locating unusual (outlying) marginal 2D distributions of points for anomaly detection and 3) sorting multivariate displays based on high-dimensional data, such as trees, parallel coordinates, and glyphs View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Interactive Visual Analysis of Families of Function Graphs

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1373 - 1385
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1529 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The analysis and exploration of multidimensional and multivariate data is still one of the most challenging areas in the field of visualization. In this paper, we describe an approach to visual analysis of an especially challenging set of problems that exhibit a complex internal data structure. We describe the interactive visual exploration and analysis of data that includes several (usually large) families of function graphs fi(x, t). We describe analysis procedures and practical aspects of the interactive visual analysis specific to this type of data (with emphasis on the function graph characteristic of the data). We adopted the well-proven approach of multiple, linked views with advanced interactive brushing to assess the data. Standard views such as histograms, scatterplots, and parallel coordinates are used to jointly visualize data. We support iterative visual analysis by providing means to create complex, composite brushes that span multiple views and that are constructed using different combination schemes. We demonstrate that engineering applications represent a challenging but very applicable area for visual analytics. As a case study, we describe the optimization of a fuel injection system in diesel engines of passenger cars View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Generating Graphs for Visual Analytics through Interactive Sketching

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1386 - 1398
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2968 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We introduce an interactive graph generator, GreenSketch, designed to facilitate the creation of descriptive graphs required for different visual analytics tasks. The human-centric design approach of GreenSketch enables users to master the creation process without specific training or prior knowledge of graph model theory. The customized user interface encourages users to gain insight into the connection between the compact matrix representation and the topology of a graph layout when they sketch their graphs. Both the human-enforced and machine-generated randomnesses supported by GreenSketch provide the flexibility needed to address the uncertainty factor in many analytical tasks. This paper describes more than two dozen examples that cover a wide variety of graph creations from a single line of nodes to a real-life small-world network that describes a snapshot of telephone connections. While the discussion focuses mainly on the design of GreenSketch, we include a case study that applies the technology in a visual analytics environment and a usability study that evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of our design approach View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Graph Signatures for Visual Analytics

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1399 - 1413
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3335 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a visual analytics technique to explore graphs using the concept of a data signature. A data signature, in our context, is a multidimensional vector that captures the local topology information surrounding each graph node. Signature vectors extracted from a graph are projected onto a low-dimensional scatterplot through the use of scaling. The resultant scatterplot, which reflects the similarities of the vectors, allows analysts to examine the graph structures and their corresponding real-life interpretations through repeated use of brushing and linking between the two visualizations. The interpretation of the graph structures is based on the outcomes of multiple participatory analysis sessions with intelligence analysts conducted by the authors at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The paper first uses three public domain data sets with either well-known or obvious features to explain the rationale of our design and illustrate its results. More advanced examples are then used in a customized usability study to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach. The study results reveal not only the limitations and weaknesses of the traditional approach based solely on graph visualization, but also the advantages and strengths of our signature-guided approach presented in the paper View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • TreePlus: Interactive Exploration of Networks with Enhanced Tree Layouts

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1414 - 1426
    Cited by:  Papers (23)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1661 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite extensive research, it is still difficult to produce effective interactive layouts for large graphs. Dense layout and occlusion make food Webs, ontologies and social networks difficult to understand and interact with. We propose a new interactive visual analytics component called TreePlus that is based on a tree-style layout. TreePlus reveals the missing graph structure with visualization and interaction while maintaining good readability. To support exploration of the local structure of the graph and gathering of information from the extensive reading of labels, we use a guiding metaphor of "plant a seed and watch it grow." It allows users to start with a node and expand the graph as needed, which complements the classic overview techniques that can be effective at (but often limited to) revealing clusters. We describe our design goals, describe the interface and report on a controlled user study with 28 participants comparing TreePlus with a traditional graph interface for six tasks. In general, the advantage of TreePlus over the traditional interface increased as the density of the displayed data increased. Participants also reported higher levels of confidence in their answers with TreePlus and most of them preferred TreePlus View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Visual Analysis of Large Heterogeneous Social Networks by Semantic and Structural Abstraction

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1427 - 1439
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3883 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Social network analysis is an active area of study beyond sociology. It uncovers the invisible relationships between actors in a network and provides understanding of social processes and behaviors. It has become an important technique in a variety of application areas such as the Web, organizational studies, and homeland security. This paper presents a visual analytics tool, OntoVis, for understanding large, heterogeneous social networks, in which nodes and links could represent different concepts and relations, respectively. These concepts and relations are related through an ontology (also known as a schema). OntoVis is named such because it uses information in the ontology associated with a social network to semantically prune a large, heterogeneous network. In addition to semantic abstraction, OntoVis also allows users to do structural abstraction and importance filtering to make large networks manageable and to facilitate analytic reasoning. All these unique capabilities of OntoVis are illustrated with several case studies View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Interactive Exploration of Data Traffic with Hierarchical Network Maps

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1440 - 1449
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3287 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Network communication has become indispensable in business, education and government. With the pervasive role of the Internet as a means of sharing information across networks, its misuse for destructive purposes, such as spreading malicious code, compromising remote hosts, or damaging data through unauthorized access, has grown immensely in the recent years. The classical way of monitoring the operation of large network systems is by analyzing the system logs for detecting anomalies. In this work, we introduce hierarchical network map, an interactive visualization technique for gaining a deeper insight into network flow behavior by means of user-driven visual exploration. Our approach is meant as an enhancement to conventional analysis methods based on statistics or machine learning. We use multidimensional modeling combined with position and display awareness to view source and target data of the hosts in a hierarchical fashion with the ability to interactively change the level of aggregation or apply filtering. The interdisciplinary approach integrating data warehouse technology, information visualization and decision support brings about the benefit of efficiently collecting the input data and aggregating over very large data sets, visualizing the results and providing interactivity to facilitate analytical reasoning View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Visualizing Internet Routing Changes

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1450 - 1460
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3754 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Today's Internet provides a global data delivery service to millions of end users and routing protocols play a critical role in this service. It is important to be able to identify and diagnose any problems occurring in Internet routing. However, the Internet's sheer size makes this task difficult. One cannot easily extract out the most important or relevant routing information from the large amounts of data collected from multiple routers. To tackle this problem, we have developed Link-Rank, a tool to visualize Internet routing changes at the global scale. Link-Rank weighs links in a topological graph by the number of routes carried over each link and visually captures changes in link weights in the form of a topological graph with adjustable size. Using Link-Rank, network operators can easily observe important routing changes from massive amounts of routing data, discover otherwise unnoticed routing problems, understand the impact of topological events, and infer root causes of observed routing changes View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Visualization System for Space-Time and Multivariate Patterns (VIS-STAMP)

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1461 - 1474
    Cited by:  Papers (56)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5336 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The research reported here integrates computational, visual and cartographic methods to develop a geovisual analytic approach for exploring and understanding spatio-temporal and multivariate patterns. The developed methodology and tools can help analysts investigate complex patterns across multivariate, spatial and temporal dimensions via clustering, sorting and visualization. Specifically, the approach involves a self-organizing map, a parallel coordinate plot, several forms of reorderable matrices (including several ordering methods), a geographic small multiple display and a 2-dimensional cartographic color design method. The coupling among these methods leverages their independent strengths and facilitates a visual exploration of patterns that are difficult to discover otherwise. The visualization system we developed supports overview of complex patterns and through a variety of interactions, enables users to focus on specific patterns and examine detailed views. We demonstrate the system with an application to the IEEE InfoVis 2005 contest data set, which contains time-varying, geographically referenced and multivariate data for technology companies in the US View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • VU-Flow: A Visualization Tool for Analyzing Navigation in Virtual Environments

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1475 - 1485
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3088 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a tool for the visual analysis of navigation patterns of moving entities, such as users, virtual characters or vehicles in 3D virtual environments (VEs). The tool, called VU-Flow, provides a set of interactive visualizations that highlight interesting navigation behaviors of single or groups of moving entities that were the VE together or separately. The visualizations help to improve the design of VEs and to study the navigation behavior of users, e.g., during controlled experiments. Besides VEs, the proposed techniques could also be applied to visualize real-world data recorded by positioning systems, allowing one to employ VU-Flow in domains such as urban planning, transportation, and emergency response View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Summarizing Dynamic Bipolar Conflict Structures

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1486 - 1499
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2570 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a method for visual summary of bilateral conflict structures embodied in event data. Such data consists of actors linked by time-stamped events and may be extracted from various sources such as news reports and dossiers. When analyzing political events, it is of particular importance to be able to recognize conflicts and actors involved in them. By projecting actors into a conflict space, we are able to highlight the main opponents in a series of tens of thousands of events and provide a graphic overview of the conflict structure. Moreover, our method allows for smooth animation of the dynamics of a conflict View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Provenance and Annotation for Visual Exploration Systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1500 - 1510
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2598 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Exploring data using visualization systems has been shown to be an extremely powerful technique. However, one of the challenges with such systems is an inability to completely support the knowledge discovery process. More than simply looking at data, users will make a semipermanent record of their visualizations by printing out a hard copy. Subsequently, users will mark and annotate these static representations, either for dissemination purposes or to augment their personal memory of what was witnessed. In this paper, we present a model for recording the history of user explorations in visualization environments, augmented with the capability for users to annotate their explorations. A prototype system is used to demonstrate how this provenance information can be recalled and shared. The prototype system generates interactive visualizations of the provenance data using a spatio-temporal technique. Beyond the technical details of our model and prototype, results from a controlled experiment that explores how different history mechanisms impact problem solving in visualization environments are presented View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Insight-Based Longitudinal Study of Visual Analytics

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1511 - 1522
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2228 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Visualization tools are typically evaluated in controlled studies that observe the short-term usage of these tools by participants on preselected data sets and benchmark tasks. Though such studies provide useful suggestions, they miss the long-term usage of the tools. A longitudinal study of a bioinformatics data set analysis is reported here. The main focus of this work is to capture the entire analysts process that an analyst goes through from a raw data set to the insights sought from the data. The study provides interesting observations about the use of visual representations and interaction mechanisms provided by the tools, and also about the process of insight generation in general. This deepens our understanding of visual analytics, guides visualization developers in creating more effective visualization tools in terms of user requirements, and guides evaluators in designing future studies that are more representative of insights sought by users from their data sets View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Expressive Facial Animation Synthesis by Learning Speech Coarticulation and Expression Spaces

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1523 - 1534
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1745 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Synthesizing expressive facial animation is a very challenging topic within the graphics community. In this paper, we present an expressive facial animation synthesis system enabled by automated learning from facial motion capture data. Accurate 3D motions of the markers on the face of a human subject are captured while he/she recites a predesigned corpus, with specific spoken and visual expressions. We present a novel motion capture mining technique that "learns" speech coarticulation models for diphones and triphones from the recorded data. A phoneme-independent expression eigenspace (PIEES) that encloses the dynamic expression signals is constructed by motion signal processing (phoneme-based time-warping and subtraction) and principal component analysis (PCA) reduction. New expressive facial animations are synthesized as follows: First, the learned coarticulation models are concatenated to synthesize neutral visual speech according to novel speech input, then a texture-synthesis-based approach is used to generate a novel dynamic expression signal from the PIEES model, and finally the synthesized expression signal is blended with the synthesized neutral visual speech to create the final expressive facial animation. Our experiments demonstrate that the system can effectively synthesize realistic expressive facial animation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-Quality and Interactive Animations of 3D Time-Varying Vector Fields

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1535 - 1546
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3839 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present an interactive texture-based method for visualizing three-dimensional unsteady vector fields. The visualization method uses a sparse and global representation of the flow, such that it does not suffer from the same perceptual issues as is the case for visualizing dense representations. The animation is made by injecting a collection of particles evenly distributed throughout the physical domain. These particles are then tracked along their path lines. At each time step, these particles are used as seed points to generate field lines using any vector field such as the velocity field or vorticity field. In this way, the animation shows the advection of particles while each frame in the animation shows the instantaneous vector field. In order to maintain a coherent particle density and to avoid clustering as time passes, we have developed a novel particle advection strategy which produces approximately evenly-spaced field lines at each time step. To improve rendering performance, we decouple the rendering stage from the preceding stages of the visualization method. This allows interactive exploration of multiple fields simultaneously, which sets the stage for a more complete analysis of the flow field. The final display is rendered using texture-based direct volume rendering View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Image-Based Stained Glass

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1547 - 1558
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3425 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a method of restyling an image so that it approximates the visual appearance of a work of stained glass. To this end, we develop a novel approach which involves image warping, segmentation, querying, and colorization along with texture synthesis. In our method, a given input image is first segmented. Each segment is subsequently transformed to match real segments of stained glass queried from a database of image exemplars. By using real sources of stained glass, our method produces high quality results in this nascent area of nonphotorealistic rendering. The generation of the stained glass requires only modest amounts of user interaction. This interaction is facilitated with a unique region-merging tool View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Illustrative Context-Preserving Exploration of Volume Data

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1559 - 1569
    Cited by:  Papers (28)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2897 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In volume rendering, it is very difficult to simultaneously visualize interior and exterior structures while preserving clear shape cues. Highly transparent transfer functions produce cluttered images with many overlapping structures, while clipping techniques completely remove possibly important context information. In this paper, we present a new model for volume rendering, inspired by techniques from illustration. It provides a means of interactively inspecting the interior of a volumetric data set in a feature-driven way which retains context information. The context-preserving volume rendering model uses a function of shading intensity, gradient magnitude, distance to the eye point, and previously accumulated opacity to selectively reduce the opacity in less important data regions. It is controlled by two user-specified parameters. This new method represents an alternative to conventional clipping techniques, sharing their easy and intuitive user control, but does not suffer from the drawback of missing context information View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Local Histograms for Design of Transfer Functions in Direct Volume Rendering

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1570 - 1579
    Cited by:  Papers (40)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2406 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Direct volume rendering (DVR) is of increasing diagnostic value in the analysis of data sets captured using the latest medical imaging modalities. The deployment of DVR in everyday clinical work, however, has so far been limited. One contributing factor is that current transfer function (TF) models can encode only a small fraction of the user's domain knowledge. In this paper, we use histograms of local neighborhoods to capture tissue characteristics. This allows domain knowledge on spatial relations in the data set to be integrated into the TF. As a first example, we introduce partial range histograms in an automatic tissue detection scheme and present its effectiveness in a clinical evaluation. We then use local histogram analysis to perform a classification where the tissue-type certainty is treated as a second TF dimension. The result is an enhanced rendering where tissues with overlapping intensity ranges can be discerned without requiring the user to explicitly define a complex, multidimensional TF View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • RotoTexture: Automated Tools for Texturing Raw Video

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1580 - 1589
    Cited by:  Papers (8)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3260 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose a video editing system that allows a user to apply a time-coherent texture to a surface depicted in the raw video from a single uncalibrated camera, including the surface texture mapping of a texture image and the surface texture synthesis from a texture swatch. Our system avoids the construction of a 3D shape model and instead uses the recovered normal field to deform the texture so that it plausibly adheres to the undulations of the depicted surface. The texture mapping method uses the nonlinear least-squares optimization of a spring model to control the behavior of the texture image as it is deformed to match the evolving normal field through the video. The texture synthesis method uses a coarse optical flow to advect clusters of pixels corresponding to patches of similarly oriented surface points. These clusters are organized into a minimum advection tree to account for the dynamic visibility of clusters. We take a rather crude approach to normal recovering and optical flow estimation, yet the results are robust and plausible for nearly diffuse surfaces such as faces and t-shirts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Sample-Based Cameras for Feed Forward Reflection Rendering

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1590 - 1600
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3025 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents sample-based cameras for rendering high quality reflections on convex reflectors at interactive rates. The method supports change of view, moving objects and reflectors, higher order reflections, view-dependent lighting of reflected objects, and reflector surface properties. In order to render reflections with the feed forward graphics pipeline, one has to project reflected vertices. A sample-based camera is a collection of BSP trees of pinhole cameras that jointly approximate the projection function. It is constructed from the reflected rays defined by the desired view and the scene reflectors. A scene point is projected by invoking only the cameras that contain it in their frustums. Reflections are rendered by projecting the scene geometry and then rasterizing in hardware View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Streamline Predicates

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1601 - 1612
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1625 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Predicates are functions that return Boolean values. They are an essential tool in computer science. A close look at flow feature definitions reveals that they can be seen as point predicates that tell if a specific feature exists at a certain point. Besides the information about features, scientists and engineers like to know the overall behavior of all streamlines in the flow, typically in the connection with the important features in their application domain. We call this a structure definition for the flow. A successful example for a structure definition is flow topology. In this paper, we present streamline predicates as functions that tell the user about the connection between streamlines and features selected by the user. This means answers to questions like: Which streamlines flow through a given vortex, separation bubble, or shock wave? It can be shown that streamline predicates may refine flow topology so that it also reveals questions about vortices in 3D View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • [Back inside cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (150 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Visualization techniques and methodologies; visualization systems and software; volume visualization; flow visualization; multivariate visualization; modeling and surfaces; rendering; animation; user interfaces; visual progranuning; applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Leila De Floriani
Department of Computer Science, Bioengineering, Robotics and Systems Engineering
University of Genova
16146 Genova (Italy)
ldf4tvcg@umiacs.umd.edu