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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date May 1982

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  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): c2
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  • Guest Editorial: Reliability Issues in Distributed Systems

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 165 - 167
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    TO provide continuity of operations in automated systems, we need to develop techniques that can make them reliable. Many systems such as used in space programs, air traffic control, nuclear plant monitors, ballistic missile defense, etc., demand robust operation. In the past, research efforts have focused on the design and implementation of distributed systems used in such applications. We foresee a need of research effort in the investigation of algorithms and system structures that make error/failure detection, reconfiguration, recovery, and restart of a system feasible with the least amount of interruptions. View full abstract»

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  • Nested Transactions in Distributed Systems

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 167 - 172
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In database management systems and operating systems, transactions are used as units of consistency, serializability, recovery, and for deadlock control. Normally, the transactions for each of these systems are considered independently. In this paper we describe nested transactions where the transactions from one system interact with the transactions from another system. Such nested transactions can expect to become more important with the introduction of network operating systems and heterogeneous distributed database systems. View full abstract»

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  • Resilient Extended True-Copy Token Scheme for a Distributed Database System

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 173 - 189
    Cited by:  Papers (21)
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    A new resiliency scheme for a distributed database system with replicated data is presented. One salient feature of the scheme is that it does not employ a log subsystem; hence, it can be used for a highly reliable system that must tolerate a total crash of a site. In addition, the scheme supports system partitioning without any consistency problem. The new scheme is based on a precise treatment of logical data; in particular, a precise definition of resilient system operation is given in terms of logical data. View full abstract»

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  • Approaches to Mechanization of the Conversation Scheme Based on Monitors

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 189 - 197
    Cited by:  Papers (39)
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    A basic problem in designing error detection and backward recovery capabilities into concurrent programs is to coordinate the detection and recovery activities of cooperating processes. As an aid to such design Randell proposed a language construct called conversation in an abstract form. Practical mechanization of the conversation scheme, i.e., selection of a well-structured syntax and associated semantics, is the issue dealt with in this paper. Four different mechanizations based on the monitor approach to interprocess communication are presented. They are presented as feasible extensions of Concurrent Pascal in order to enable visualization of their full implementation details in at least one type of concurrent programming environment. They are presented in the increasing order of the amount of efforts that they require for extending Concurrent Pascal. They offer different degrees of assistance to the programmer in proper structuring of recoverable process interactions. View full abstract»

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  • Global States of a Distributed System

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 198 - 202
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
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    A global state of a distributed transaction system is consistent if no transactions are in progress. A global checkpoint is a transaction which must view a globally consistent system state for correct operation. We present an algorithm for adding global checkpoint transactions to an arbitrary distributed transaction system. The algorithm is nonintrusive in the sense that checkpoint transactions do not interfere with ordinary transactions in progress; however, the checkpoint transactions still produce meaningful results. View full abstract»

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  • On Linguistic Support for Distributed Programs

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 203 - 210
    Cited by:  Papers (24)
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    Technological advances have made it possible to construct systems from collections of computers connected by a network. At present, however, there is little support for the construction and execution of software to run on such a system. Our research concerns the development of an integrated language/system whose goal is to provide the needed support. This paper discusses a number of issues that must be addressed in such a language. The major focus of our work and this paper is support for the construction of robust software that survives node, network, and media failures. View full abstract»

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  • A New Method for Concurrency in B-Trees

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 211 - 222
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (5)
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    In this paper we study the problem of supporting concurrent operations in B-trees and their variants. A survey of previous work is given and two basic types of solutions to this problem are identified. A new solution with a greater degree of concurrency is proposed. As solutions are surveyed or presented we identify useful techniques which have wider applicability. In particular, we introduce the technique of side-branching in our new solution. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing the Security of Statistical Databases with a Question-Answering System and a Kernel Design

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 223 - 234
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The security problem of a statistical database is to limit database use so that no private information is deducible. This paper discusses the advantages of using a Question-Answering System and a security kernel to enhance the security constraints at the conceptual model level. An SDB design with the goal of helping the DBA in specifying certain security contraints is proposed. View full abstract»

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  • Symbolic Gray Code as a Perfect Multiattribute Hashing Scheme for Partial Match Queries

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 235 - 249
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In this paper, we shall show that the symbolic Gray code hashing mechanism is not only good for best matching, but also good for partial match queries. Essentially, we shall propose a new hashing scheme, called bucket-oriented symbolic Gray code, which can be used to produce any arbitrary Cartesian product file, which has been shown to be good for partial match queries. Many interesting properties of this new multiattribute hashing scheme, including the property that it is a perfect hashing scheme, have been discussed and proved. View full abstract»

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  • An Operational Approach to Requirements Specification for Embedded Systems

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 250 - 269
    Cited by:  Papers (86)
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    The approach to requirements specification for embedded systems described in this paper is called "operational" because a requirements specification is an executable model of the proposed system interacting with its environment. The approach is embodied by the language PAISLey, which is motivated and defined herein. Embedded systems are characterized by asynchronous parallelism, even at the requirements level; PAISLey specifications are constructed by interacting processes so that this can be represented directly. Embedded systems are also characterized by urgent performance requirements, and PAISLey offers a formal, but intuitive, treatment of performance. View full abstract»

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  • Understanding and Documenting Programs

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 270 - 283
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
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    This paper reports on an experiment in trying to understand an unfamiliar program of some complexity and to record the authors' understanding of it. The goal was to simulate a practicing programmer in a program maintenance environment using the techniques of program design adapted to program understanding and documentation; that is, given a program, a specification and correctness proof were developed for the program. The approach points out the value of correctness proof ideas in guiding the discovery process. Toward this end, a variety of techniques were used: direct cognition for smaller parts, discovering and verifying loop invariants for larger program parts, and functions determined by additional analysis for larger program parts. An indeterminate bounded variable was introduced into the program documentation to summarize the effect of several program variables and simplify the proof of correctness. View full abstract»

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  • Macro Implementation of a Structured Assembly Language

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 284 - 287
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The feasibility of using macros to compile a linear assembly language is well established. A cross assembler has been implemented, via macros, for an assembly language, SCRAM, which embodies high-level language features such as user-controlled symbol scope and nested DO and IF/THEN/ELSE control structutes. Difficulties arose in implementation primarily from the inconvenience of managing assembly-time data View full abstract»

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  • Achieving Distributed Termination without Freezing

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 287 - 292
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
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    An efficient algorithm for achieving distributed termination without introducing new communicaton channels and without delaying the basic computations ("freezing") is presented. The algorithm is related to the methodology of designing distributed programs where the programmer is relieved from the problem of distributed termination. An informal correctness proof and complexity analysis are included. View full abstract»

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  • 1981 Referees List

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 293 - 294
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  • Announcing The 3rd International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 294
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  • IEEE Computer Society Press Checklist of New Titles

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 294-b
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  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 294-c
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  • Call for Papers

    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 294
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org