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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date Sept. 1978

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (337 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Specification and Implementation of Mutual Exclusion

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 365 - 370
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1896 KB)  

    This paper presents a constructive approach to the problem of specifying, implementing, and verifying operations that will give concurrent processes exclusive access to a resource. The method eliminates the need for auxiliary variables and establishes the correctness of a whole class of solutions to the same problem. The solutions are derived directly from the specifications using a language construct called guarded regions. Several new solutions to well-known exclusion problems are presented. View full abstract»

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  • An Application of a Method for Analysis of Cyclic Prog rams

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 371 - 378
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2560 KB)  

    A parallel program, Dijkstra's "on-the-fly" garbage collector, is proved correct using analysis along the lines suggested by Francez and Pnueli for cyclic programs. The method is briefly reviewed, and the proof is compared to another proof by D. Gries, based on a method by S. Owickd. The differences between the two approaches are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Program Optimization Using Invariants

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 378 - 389
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3904 KB)  

    Optimizing a computer program is defined as improving the execution time without disturbing the correctness. We show how to use invariants from a proof of correctness in order to change the statement in and around the program's loops. This approach is shown to systematize existing optimization methods, and to sometimes allow stronger optimizations than are possible under the standard transformation approach. View full abstract»

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  • An Optimal Approach to Fault Tolerant Software Systems Design

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 390 - 409
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4456 KB)  

    A systematic method of providing software system fault recovery with maximal fault coverage subject to resource constraints of overall recovery cost and additional fault rate is presented. This method is based on a model for software systems which provides a measure of the fault coverage properties of the system in the presence of computer hardware faults. Techniques for system parameter measurements are given. An optimization problem results which is a doubly-constrained 0,1 Knapsack problem. Quantitative results are presented demonstrating the effectiveness of the approach. View full abstract»

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  • An Approach to Formal Definitions and Proofs of Programming Principles

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 410 - 413
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (968 KB)  

    A method for formal description of programming prinicples is presented in this paper. Programming principles, such as sequential search can be defined and proven even in the absence of an application. We represent a principle as a program scheme which has partially interpreted functions in it. The functions must obey certain input constraints. Use of these ideas in program proving is illustrated with examples. View full abstract»

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  • Syntactic Error Correction in Programming Languages

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 414 - 425
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3136 KB)  

    A technique for syntactic error correction, called pattern mapping, is developed. A pattern is used to describe how to map or change one string into another. Using a preconstructed list of patterns, for each detected error, the first pattern with successful mapping is found and a correction is made based on this pattern. View full abstract»

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  • Formal Modeling of Virtual Machines

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 426 - 436
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3416 KB)  

    A preliminary example of program development demonstrates that the control-independent implementation of data types can lead to very inefficient code. The concept of a data space, which emphasizes the interaction between data and control structures, is introduced as a formal model of virtual machines. The model consists of three components: a state space X, an information structure F, and a control component p. Formally, X is a set of objects, F a set of functions with common domain X mapping the states to the value sets of certain data types, and p a partial function X → X. Two important points of investigation are the characterization of state space structure and the mechanism of implementation. Good state description is characterized by "completeness" and "orthogonality." Either property plays a prominent role for the concept of implementation which, in turn, is formally defined as a mapping from a "virtual" space to a "real" space, via some "macro" space. These notions are illugtrated by means of several examples from the area of programming languages. View full abstract»

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  • An Analysis of "Distributed Free Space" in an Operating and Data Management Systems Environment

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 436 - 440
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2616 KB)  

    Due to subsequent insertion and deletion, the performance of a file will decline as time goes by. In order to maintain a fast response time at the expense of storage space, a technique commonly known as "within distributed free space" has been developed and used in many access methods. In this paper, a procedure to determine and preallocate the size of "within distributed free space" is presented. The optimal block size for a data storage area, which minimizes the CPU operations and I/O interruptions, is also described. View full abstract»

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  • Towards Automatic Auditing of Records

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 441 - 448
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2096 KB)  

    We computer scientists face at least two problems in promoting the use of computerized data-base systems: 1) some important data might be missing; 2) there might be errors in the data. Both of these problems can be quite serious. If they cannot be solved, it will be quite hard to convince potential users that computerized information systems are useful. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 448-a
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Announcing a new Quarterly IEEE Transactions ... IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence

    Publication Year: 1978 , Page(s): 448
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org