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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date Sept. 1977

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): c2
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  • Virtual Machine Communication for the Implementation of Decision Support Systems

    Page(s): 333 - 342
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    This paper presents the use of the virtual machine concept as a software engineering tool. The focus is on techniques that allow the rapid integration and assimilation of existing data, models, analytical facilities, report generation facilities, and data base management systems. Since many of these models, programs, and facilities run under different operating systems, they often are incompatible with each other. By combining multiple virtual machines in a particular configuration, and allowing for communication among them, it has been possible to overcome these difficulties. The result is a set of software engineering tools that seem particularly useful in decision support systems. We present the application of these tools along with the software techniques used to implement them, and quantify some of their costs and benefits. View full abstract»

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  • A Machine Description Facility for Compiler Testing

    Page(s): 343 - 351
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    Requirements for a machine description facility for compiler testing are discussed. The compiler testing procedure consists of proving that programs are correctly translated by the compiler at hand. This is achieved by use of a common intermediate representation for both the source and object programs. The intermediate representation for the object program is built by use of a process termed symbolic interpretation. This process interprets a set of procedures which describe the effects of machine language instructions corresponding to the target machine on a suitable computation model in a manner consistent with an execution level definition of the high level language. Some of the important factors which enter into such a definition are discussed. These include architectural constraints posed by the target machine, and a description facility for memory and data types. Once such a definition is formulated, the actual instruction set of the target machine can be described. The highlights and limitations of such a definition facility are discussed in the context of a specific LISP implementation on a PDP-10 computer. View full abstract»

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  • Deletions That Preserve Randomness

    Page(s): 351 - 359
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    This paper discusses dynamic properties of data structures under insertions and deletions It is shown that, in certain circumstances, the result of n random insertions and m random deletions will be equivalent to n-m random insertions, under various interpretations of the world "random" and under various constraints on the order of insertions and deletions. View full abstract»

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  • A New Nonlinear Pseudorandom Number Generator

    Page(s): 359 - 363
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    During the next few years a new pseudorandom number generator will become available on many computer systems. A concern for the security of computer data has led to the adoption of a Data Encryption Standard (DES) by the National Bureau of Standards. This standard specifies a nonlinear cryptographic algorithm which can be used inter alia as a source of pseudorandom numbers in software applications, such as those involving order statistics, where the usual linear congruential and generalized feedback shift register generators seem to be inadequate. Results of testing the DES as a pseudorandom number generator indicate that the algorithm is more than satisfactory for this purpose. View full abstract»

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  • The Influence of Structured Programming on PL/I Program Profiles

    Page(s): 364 - 368
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    Two sets of commercial PL/I programs are studied. One set represents programming practice before the introduction of structured programming techniques and the other set after their introduction. The use of these new methods is found to make a measurable difference on the quality of the programs. A few minor changes in the use of PL/I are noted. Substantial modifications to the control structure of the programs are measured. Also, some improvements in the qualitative aspects of the two sets are discussed. Although, they are much improved, further alterations can make the programs still better. The time and training required to introduce structured programming techniques will begin paying dividends within six months. View full abstract»

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  • Program Replacement for Better Throughput

    Page(s): 369 - 374
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    This paper describes a method for increasing the batch-processing efficiency of medium and large scale scientific computer systems with a small main memory. A program-replacement algorithm, RESEP, is defined whose goal is to always keep the CPU busy. RESEP temporarily transfers selected programs from main memory to the secondary storage. Reallocation of such programs is also performed by this algorithm. View full abstract»

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  • if your computer engineering library doesn't subscribe to all 3 it's not complete.

    Page(s): 374
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  • Announcing the IEEE Computer Society's Standing Subscription Plan [advertisement]

    Page(s): 374
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  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Page(s): 374-c
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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): 374
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org