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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1977

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editor's Notice

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial Reflections on Requirements

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 2 - 5
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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  • Structured Analysis for Requirements Definition

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 6 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (115)  |  Patents (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3320 KB)  

    Requirements definition encompasses all aspects of system development prior to actual system design. We see the lack of an adequate approach to requirements definition as the source of major difficulties in current systems worlk This paper examines the needs for requirements definition, and proposes meeting those objectives with three interrelated subjects: context analysis, functional specification, and design constraints. Requirements definition replaces the widely used, but never well-defined, term "requirements analysis." View full abstract»

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  • Structured Analysis (SA): A Language for Communicating Ideas

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 16 - 34
    Cited by:  Papers (114)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3640 KB)  

    Structured analysis (SA) combines blueprint-like graphic language with the nouns and verbs of any other language to provide a hierarchic, top-down, gradual exposition of detail in the form of an SA model. The things and happenings of a subject are expressed in a data decomposition and an activity decomposition, both of which employ the same graphic building block, the SA box, to represent a part of a whole. SA arrows, representing input, output, control, and mechanism, express the relation of each part to the whole. The paper describes the rationalization behind some 40 features of the SA language, and shows how they enable rigorous communication which results frorn disciplined, recursive application of the SA maxim: "Everything worth saying about anything worth saying something about must be expressed in six or fewer pieces." View full abstract»

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  • Automated Software Engineering Through Structured Data Management

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 34 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2888 KB)  

    The Software Engineering Facility (SEF) is a system for software engineering which is specifically designed to support the development of well-engineered software. However, it is not an operating system. Unlike operating systems such as OS/370, EXEC 8, and others, the SEF is not meant to support the execution of applications programs, just as the ordinary operating systems are not intended to specifically support the development of well-engineered applications programs. The SEF, in fact, will run under and use the facilities of such operating systems. It, then, is easily transferable and can be used with vaxious hardware/operating system configurations where it will provide a host-independent software development system. In such a role it will provide to the software developer standard facilities across a variety of host systems. View full abstract»

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  • PSL/PSA: A Computer-Aided Technique for Structured Documentation and Analysis of Information Processing Systems

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 41 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (84)
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    PSL/PSA is a computer-aided structured documentation and analysis technique that was developed for, and is being used for, analysis and documentation of requirements and preparation of functional specifications for information processing systems. The present status of requirements definition is outlined as the basis for describing the problem which PSL/PSA is intended to solve. The basic concepts of the Problem Statement Language are introduced and the content and use of a number of standard reports that can be produced by the Problem Statement Analyzer are briefly described. View full abstract»

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  • An Extendable Approach to Computer-Aided Software Requirements Engineering

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 49 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5072 KB)  

    The development of system requirements has been recognized as one of the major problems in the process of developing data processing system software. We have developed a computer-aided system for maintaining and analyzing such requirements. This system includes the Requirements Statement Language (RSL), a flow-oriented language for the expression of software requirements, and the Requirements Engineering and Validation System (REVS), a software package which includes a translator for RSL, a data base for maintaining the description of system requirements, and a collection of tools to analyze the information in the data base. The system emphasizes a balance between the use of the creativity of human thought processes and the rigor and thoroughness of computer analysis. To maintain this balance, two key design principles–extensibility and disciplined thinking–were foliowed throughout the system. Both the language and the software are easily user-extended, but adequate locks are placed on extensions, and limitations are imposed on use, so that discipline is augmented rather than decreased. View full abstract»

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  • A Requirements Engineering Methodology for Real-Time Processing Requirements

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 60 - 69
    Cited by:  Papers (64)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4728 KB)  

    This paper describes a methodology for the generation of software requirements for large, real-time unmanned weapons systems. It describes what needs to be done, how to evaluate the intermediate products, and how to use automated aids to improve the quality of the product. An example is provided to illustrate the methodology steps and their products and the benefits. The results of some experimental applications are summarized. View full abstract»

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  • The Software Development System

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 69 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (36)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6088 KB)  

    This paper contains a discussion of the Software Development System (SDS), a methodology addressing the problems involved in the development of software for ballistic missile defense systems. These are large real-time, automated systems with a requirement for high reliability. The SDS is a broad approach attacking problems arising in requirements generation, software design, coding, and testing. The approach is highly requirements oriented and has resulted in the formulation of structuring concepts, a requirements statement language, process design language, and support software to be used throughout the development cycle. This methodology represents a significant advance in software technology for the development of software for a class of systems such as BMD. The support software has been implemented and is undergoing evaluation. View full abstract»

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  • Multiprocessor Scheduling with the Aid of Network Flow Algorithms

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 85 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (197)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3072 KB)  

    In a distributed computing system a modular program must have its modules assigned among the processors so as to avoid excessive interprocessor communication while taking advantage of specific efficiencies of some processors in executing some program modules. In this paper we show that this program module assignment problem can be solved efficiently by making use of the well-known Ford–Fulkerson algorithm for finding maximum flows in commodity networks as modified by Edmonds and Karp, Dinic, and Karzanov. A solution to the two-processor problem is given, and extensions to three and n-processors are considered with partial results given without a complete efficient solution. View full abstract»

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  • Two Methods for the Efficient Analysis of Memory Address Trace Data

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 94 - 101
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2640 KB)  

    The high cost of analyzing long memory address traces has limited most researchers to short traces and analysis algorithms that are linear in the length of the trace. We suggest two methods that permit a trace to be shortened in length by one to two orders of magnitude (or more) for later further analysis. The Stack Deletion Method eliminates all references in the trace to the top k levels of the LRU stack. The Snapshot Method records the reference bits of the pages in the original tape at discrete intervals and uses these bits to generate a new trace. Extensive measurements are presented, from which we conclude that there is little or no loss in accuracy using reduced traces for many purposes for a wide range of memory sizes and degrees of reduction. View full abstract»

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  • Acknowledgment of Referees

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 102
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 102
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  • if your computer engineering library doesn't subscribe to all 3 it's not complete.

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 102
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  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 102-c
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  • Announcing the IEEE Computer Society's Standing Subscription Plan [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1977 , Page(s): 102
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org