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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 7 • Date July 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Path Prefix Software Testing Strategy

    Page(s): 761 - 766
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    A new software testing strategy is described. The strategy is "adaptive" in that previous test paths (inputs) are used as a guide in the selection of subsequent paths (inputs). Preliminary implementations have successfully exploited the method's inherent user-interactive capability. The method ensures branch coverage, requires only "order n" tests (n being the number of decision nodes in the program flowgraph), and offers considerable advantages over existing strategies in its computational requirements. View full abstract»

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  • Measuring Errors in Operational Analysis Assumptions

    Page(s): 767 - 776
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    Operational analysis, an area of study first defined in the computer science field, has been used in the analysis of systems performance. System performance measures for a specific set of output data are obtained using operational analysis formulas derived from assumptions which are verifiable by the observed data. This paper gives relationships which may be used to quantify the errors in these assumptions. Additionally, basic propositions are given which help in understanding operational analysis assumptions. These propositions are used in developing correction terms which can be used to adjust performance measures so that their values are exact for a set of data no matter how much the assumptions used in deriving the performance measure relations are violated. View full abstract»

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  • A Recursion Theoretic Approach to Program Testing

    Page(s): 777 - 784
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    Inductive inference, the automatic synthesis of programs, bears certain ostensible relationships with program testing. For inductive inference, one must take a finite sample of the desired input/output behavior of some program and produce (synthesize) an equivalent program. In the testing paradigm, one seeks a finite sample for a function such that any program (in a given set) which computes something other than the object function differs from the object function on the finite sample. In both cases, the finite sample embodies sufficient knowledge to isolate the desired program from all other possibilities. These relationships are investigated and general recursion theoretic properties of testable sets of functions are exposed. View full abstract»

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  • Superviews: Virtual Integration of Multiple Databases

    Page(s): 785 - 798
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    An important advantage of a database system is that it provides each application with a custom view of the data. The issue addressed in this paper is how to provide such custom views to applications that access multiple databases. The paper describes a formal method that generates such superviews, in an interactive process of schema editing operations. A mapping of the superview into the individual databases is derived from the editing process, and is stored together with the superview as a virtual database. When this database is interrogated, the mapping is used to decompose each query into a set of queries against the individual databases, and recompose the answers to form an answer to the original query. As this process is transparent to the user, virtual databases may be regarded as a more general type of databases. A prototype database system, that allows users to construct virtual databases and interrogate them, has been developed. View full abstract»

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  • Two Access Methods Using Compact Binary Trees

    Page(s): 799 - 810
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    It is shown how a highly compact representation of binary trees can be used as the basis of two access methods for dynamic files, called BDS-trees and S-trees, respectively. Both these methods preserve key-order and offer easy and efficient sequential access. They are different in the way the compact binary trees are used for searching. With a BDS-tree the search is a digital search using binary digits. Although the S-tree search is performed on a bit-by-bit basis as well, it will appear to be slightly different. Actually, with S-trees the compact binary trees are used to represent separators at low storage costs. As a result, the fan-out, and thus performance, of a B-tree can be improved by using within each index page an S-tree for representing separators efficiently. View full abstract»

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  • Construction of Universal Instances for Loop-Free Network Databases Using a Join-Like Operation

    Page(s): 811 - 819
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    In this paper, we give a polynomial-time method to construct effectively the unique universal instance, using as few nulls as possible, from any loop-free network database, via a "minimal information" extension of natural join. Our results can be seen as concretely and quickly implementing the universal relation view for databases which are not pairwise consistent. View full abstract»

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  • Theory of Modules

    Page(s): 820 - 829
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    Because large-scale software development is a struggle against internal program complexity, the modules into which programs are divided play a central role in software engineering. A module encapsulating a data type allows the programmer to ignore both the details of its operations, and of its value representations. It is a primary strength of program proving that as modules divide a program, making it easier to understand, so do they divide its proof. Each module can be verified in isolation, then its internal details ignored in a proof of its use. This paper describes proofs of module abstractions based on functional semantics, and contrasts this with the Alphard formalism based on Hoare logic. View full abstract»

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  • A Conceptual Analysis of the Draco Approach to Constructing Software Systems

    Page(s): 830 - 844
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    This paper analyzes the concepts of software construction embodied in the Draco approach. The analysis relates specific aspects of Draco to particular software engineering (SE) principles and suggests future research needed to extend the approach. The purpose of this analysis is to help researchers understand Draco better and thus to enhance future research. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating Software Engineering Technologies

    Page(s): 845 - 851
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    Many new software development practices, tools, and techniques have been introduced in recent years. Few, however, have been empirically evaluated. The objectives of this study were to measure technology use in a production environment, develop a statistical model for evaluating the effectiveness of technologies, and evaluate the effects of some specific technologies on productivity and reliability. A carefully matched sample of 22 projects from the Software Engineering Laboratory database was studied using an analysis-of-covariance procedure. Limited use of the technologies considered in the analysis produced approximately a 30 percent increase in software reliability. These technologies did not demonstrate any direct effect on development productivity. View full abstract»

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  • Time-Sensitive Cost Models in the Commercial MIS Environment

    Page(s): 852 - 859
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    Current time-sensitive cost models suggest a significant impact on project effort if elapsed time compression or expansion is implemented. This paper reports an empirical study into the applicability of these models in the management information systems environment. It is found that elapsed time variation does not consistently affect project effort. This result is analyzed in terms of the theory supporting such a relationship, and an alternate relationship is suggested. View full abstract»

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  • Data Integration in Distributed Databases

    Page(s): 860 - 864
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    Data integration in a distributed database refers to the production of union-compatible views for similar information expressed dissimilarly in different nodes. Such a facility is needed for location transparency and for easier formulation of global queries over the apparently incompatible data aggregated from different nodes. This paper examines the issues in data integration within a relational context, and proposes a solution based on special relational constructs which produce union-compatible relations. The advantages of this approach over others have also been discussed. View full abstract»

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  • A Note on Concurrent Programming Control

    Page(s): 865 - 866
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    An extension to Dijkstra's solution [1], of the problem of limiting access by multiple processors to a single resource, is described. The solution has similar delay characteristics to Ferguson's solution [3] while using less complex data structures. Some claims in [3] are examined. View full abstract»

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  • The One Leveraged Investment With a Guaranteed Return

    Page(s): 867 - 867-a
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Page(s): 867-b
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  • In this issue

    Page(s): 867
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org