By Topic

Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 5 • Date May 1987

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (388 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Test Data Selection and Quality Estimation Based on the Concept of Essential Branches for Path Testing

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 509 - 517
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2648 KB)  

    A new coverage measure is proposed for efficient and effective software testing. The conventional coverage measure for branch testing has such defects as overestimation of software quality and redundant test data selection because all branches are treated equally. These problems can be avoided by paying attention to only those branches essential for path testing. That is, if one branch is executed whenever another particular branch is executed, the former branch is nonessential for path testing. This is because a path covering the latter branch also covers the former branch. Branches other than such nonessential branches will be referred to as essential branches. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Test Design Methodology for Protocol Testing

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 518 - 531
    Cited by:  Papers (40)  |  Patents (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3200 KB)  

    Communication protocol testing can be done with a test architecture consisting of remote Lower Tester and local Upper Tester processes. For real protocols, tests can be designed based on the formal specification of the protocol which uses an extended finite state machine model. The specification is transformed into a simpler form consisting of normal form transitions. It can then be modeled by a control and a data flow graph. The graphs are decomposed into subtours and data flow functions, respectively. Tests are designed by considering parameter variations of the input primitives of each data flow function and determining the expected outputs. The methodology gives complete test coverage of all data flow functions and control paths in the specification. Functional fault models are proposed for functions that are not formally specified. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Implementation of an FP-Shell

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 532 - 539
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2600 KB)  

    One of the best features of the UNIX™ Shell is that it provides a framework which can be used to build complex programs by interconnecting existing simple programs. However, it is limited to linear combinations of programs, and building of more complex programs must be accomplished by executing sequences of commands. This paper introduces Backus' FP (Functional Programming) as an alternative command language for UNIX. In FP, programs are true functions and another distinctive feature of FP languages is that they contain functional forms, which are constructs for combining programs to build new programs. Also, the functional style of programming provides a natural way of exploiting parallel machine architecture. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cooperative Distributed Algorithms for Dynamic Cycle Prevention

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 540 - 552
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3576 KB)  

    Parallel distributed algorithms are presented for adding and deleting edges in a directed graph without creating a cycle. Such algorithms are useful for a variety of problems in distributed systems such as preventing deadlock or ordering priorities. The algorithms operate in a realistic asynchronous computer network environment in which there are numerous possible interactions among overlapping instances of the algorithms. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • On the Implementation and Use of Ada on Fault-Tolerant Distributed Systems

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 553 - 563
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3352 KB)  

    In this paper, we discuss the use of Ada® on distributed systems in which failure of processors has to be tolerated. We assume that tasks are the primary object of distribution, and that communication between tasks on separate processors will take place using the facilities of the Ada language. It would be possible to build a separate set of facilities for communication between processors, and to treat the software on each machine as a separate program. This is unnecessary and undesirable. In addition, the Ada language Reference Manual states specifically that a system consisting of communicating processors with private memories is suitable for executing an Ada program. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Scheduling Tasks with Resource Requirements in Hard Real-Time Systems

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 564 - 577
    Cited by:  Papers (86)  |  Patents (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4872 KB)  

    This paper describes a heuristic approach for solving the problem of dynamically scheduling tasks in a real-time system where tasks have deadlines and general resource requirements. The crux of our approach lies in the heuristic function used to select the task to be scheduled next. The heuristic function is composed of three weighted factors. These factors explicitly consider information about real-time constraints of tasks and their utilization of resources. Simulation studies show that the weights for the various factors in the heuristic function have to be fine-tuned in order to obtain a degree of success in the range of 75-88 percent of that obtained via exhaustive search. However, modifying the approach to use limited backtracking improves the degree of success substantially to as high as 99.5 percent. This improvement is observed even when the initial set of weights are not tailored for a particular set of tasks. Simulation studies also show that in most cases the schedule determined by the heuristic algorithm is optimal or close to optimal. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • New NP-Complete Problems in Performance Evaluation of Concurrent Systems Using Petri Nets

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 578 - 581
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1736 KB)  

    Timed Petri nets are useful in performance evaluation of concurrent systems. The maximum computation rate is achieved for minimal cycle time of timed Petri net. It is known that minimal cycle time problem for P-invariant Petri nets is NP-complete. In this paper we prove that the minimal cycle time problem, for non-P-invariant Petri nets and for a small subclass of P-invariant Petri nets called free-choice nets having live and safe marking, is NP-complete. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fault-Tolerant SoFtware Reliability Modeling

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 582 - 592
    Cited by:  Papers (61)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3168 KB)  

    In situations in which computers are used to manage life-critical situations, software errors that could arise due to inadequate or incomplete testing cannot be tolerated. This paper examines three methods of creating fault-tolerant software systems, Recovery Block, N-Version Programming, and Consensus Recovery Block, and it presents reliability models for each. The models are used to show that one method, the Consensus Recovery Block, is more reliable than the other two. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Methodology for Business System Development

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 593 - 601
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1216 KB)  

    The methodology presented here is currently being used in the design of Standard Automated Financial System (STAFS), which is a large scale business system for use by the 14 Naval Laboratories across the nation. The system will be operational in 1987-1988 time-frame. The methodology presented is suitable for all transaction oriented systems. It enforces documentation of design at all levels of system development process allowing managers and users a high visibility into the design. It highlights the human engineering aspects of system design and utilizes thread definition, data designer, and structured design techniques. The methodology requires the use of system verification diagrams which specify the user requirements. The design produces an integrated database with security mechanisms to restrict unauthorized users from accessing data they are not authorized to use. The threads also serve as a useful tool for system testing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Shortest Semijoin Schedule for a Local Area Distributed Database System

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 602 - 606
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (912 KB)  

    The semijoin provides a means of reducing the amount of data transmission among sites in a distributed database system. Previously the semijoin has been studied mainly for reducing communication cost in an environment with global public communication networks. In a local area system, however, wide bandwidth is usually available and the communication cost is virtually negligible. In view of this, we adopt a simplified model of a local area network, imposing no constraint on the transmission line capacity and the communication processing capability at each site. For this model, an efficient algorithm for obtaining the shortest semijoin schedule, in the sense of minimizing the total number of semijoin transmissions, is developed. It is based on a schedule diagram newly introduced to represent the semijoin schedule. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • In this issue

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 607
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (202 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Information Edge

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 607-a
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 607-b
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Beyond the Basics: A Software Publication Series for Successful Computer Professionals From the IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1987 , Page(s): 607-c
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1120 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org