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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date April 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): c2
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  • Concurrent Certifications by Intervals of Timestamps in Distributed Database Systems

    Page(s): 409 - 419
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    This paper introduces, as an optimistic concurrency control method, a new certification method by means of intervals of timestamps, usable in a distributed database system. The main advantage of this method is that it allows a chronological commit order which differs from the serialization one (thus avoiding rejections or delays of transactions which occur in usual certification methods or in classical locking or timestamping ones). The use of the dependency graph permits both classifying this method among existing ones and proving it. The certification protocol is first presented under the hypothesis that transactions' certifications are processed in the same order on all the concerned sites; it is then extended to allow concurrent certifications of transactions. View full abstract»

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  • An Information-Based Model for Failure-Handling in Distributed Database Systems

    Page(s): 420 - 431
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    We consider the failure atomicity problem of distributed transactions in conjunction with the maximization of database availability. We propose a new information-based model for the distributed transaction-execution, which explicitly expresses the information at each stage during a protocol. In addition to rederiving certain existing results, we prove a fundamental relation among the site failures and the network partitioning. We propose a realistic model for site failures under which we show that the costs of commit and termination protocols can be greatly reduced. Finally, we explore the possible recovery strategies for a failed site and show how they are improved under our site failure model. View full abstract»

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  • A Paradigm for Developing Information Systems

    Page(s): 432 - 439
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    This paper describes a paradigm for implementing software in which 1) a database is used to maintain virtually all recorded information about the application and 2) the executable product is generated directly from the formal specifications. A specific environment, TEDIUM®, defined for a specific application class, the interactive information system, is presented as a proof of concept. The benefits of this paradigm are evaluated briefly, and the characteristics associated with its in productivity improvement are identified. View full abstract»

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  • Software Bases for the Flexible Composition of Application Systems

    Page(s): 440 - 460
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    In various application areas, classes of computer programs can be identified such that each program belonging to a class, can be considered as a special variant of a generic program. View full abstract»

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  • An Application of Structural Modeling to Software Requirements Analysis and Design

    Page(s): 461 - 471
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    In software development, it has been pointed out that software engineers must pay attention to software requirements definition. One of the important problems in software engineering is to rationalize the processes from requirements definition to design. Computer tools are most useful and efficient for this purpose. This paper proposes a computer-aided software design system (CASDS), which supports software engineers with a series of structural modeling. As is well-known in systems planning, structural modeling helps to extract concepts from many fuzzy requirements. This system contains three structural modeling methods. They are used 1) to determine functional terms from fuzzy software requirements, 2) to obtain modules by structuring the functions with respect to the data flows, and 3) to make a program skeleton by imposing control flows on the functional elements obtained by breaking down the modules. View full abstract»

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  • Refinement Methodology for Ada

    Page(s): 472 - 478
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    This paper presents Refinement Methodology (RM) for the design of Ada® programs. The methodology combines stepwise refinement and the information hiding principle. The steps of the methodology are explained and illustrated by an example. A part of the methodology is a collection of rules by which procedures acquire parameters (called first and second rules for parameters). View full abstract»

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  • Performance Criteria for Constrained Nonlinear Programming Codes

    Page(s): 479 - 489
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    A set of performance criteria for evaluating optimization software with respect to efficiency, reliability, and accuracy is presented and discussed. A numerical comparison of five constrained nonlinear programming codes is described, which was carried out in order to test the usefulness and general applicability of the proposed performance criteria. The results of the numerical comparison are discussed, and the proposed criteria are compared to the criteria traditionally used in comparative evaluations of nonlinear programming codes, with particular reference to machine dependence and the applicability to test problems with unknown solutions. A separate small scale computational experiment is described which was carried out specifically to test the machine dependence of the criteria. The observed deficiencies of the proposed new criteria are also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Program Structure Charts for Applicative Languages

    Page(s): 490 - 493
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    A framework for a system of charts compatible with the use of applicative programming languages is proposed and illustrated. The charts are similar in spirit to the structured flowcharts that have sometimes been used with algorithmic languages. They are based on a method of representing the structure of nested expressions of arbitrary complexity. This method is adaptable to the incorporation of graphical devices for the depiction of local identifier bindings, conditional expressions, recursive function definitions, and the various functional combining forms employed in the FP-style of applicative programming. View full abstract»

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  • Automatic Identification of Software System Differences

    Page(s): 493 - 497
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    A well-known method for software version control on the source file level is the incremental change technique, which isolates the differences, commonly called a delta, between two versions of a source module, and then stores only the delta. Any version of a source module can then be reconstructed from the original by successive application of deltas. The significant advantages of this approach include accuracy (because it is automatic), visibility (because it highlights differences), and economy (because it conserves storage space). View full abstract»

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  • CSM: A Distributed Programming Language

    Page(s): 497 - 500
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    This paper presents an overview of a distributed programming language called Communicating Sequential Modules or CSM, intended to support distributed computing. Developed from Modula-2 and CSP, CSM has been implemented on the ZCZ distributed microcomputer system consisting of several LSI-11 microcomputers. Its implementation is also described. View full abstract»

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  • Some Comments on "Transition-Oriented" Versus "Structured" Specification of Distributed Algorithms and Protocols

    Page(s): 501 - 505
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    Formal description techniques (FDT's) are being developed for the specification of communication protocols and other distributed systems. Some of them (namely SDL and Estelle) are based on an extended state transition model and promote a "transition-oriented" specification style. Another one (namely Lotos) and most highlevel programming languages promote a style which is called "structured." The correspondence compares these two specification styles in the framework of rendezvous interactions between different system modules. The advantages of each of the two styles are discussed in relation with an example of a virtual ring mutual exclusion protocol. Transformation rules between the two approaches are given. An extension to the state transition oriented FDT's is also suggested in order to allow for a structured specification style. View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 506
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  • In this issue

    Page(s): 506
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  • Membership Application

    Page(s): 506-b
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  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Page(s): 506-c
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  • Beyond the Basics: A Software Publication Series for Successful Computer Professionals From the IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): 506-d
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org