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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editor's Introduction

    Page(s): 1141 - 1142
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  • Essential Elements of Software Engineering Education Revisited

    Page(s): 1143 - 1148
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    A basis for software engineering education proposed in 1976 is reviewed and found to still be valid today, although needing more emphasis on design and better delivery mechanisms. Specific recommendations are made. View full abstract»

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  • The Evolution of Wang Institute's Master of Software Engineering Program

    Page(s): 1149 - 1155
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    Master of Software Engineering (MSE) programs are relatively new. Starting such a program is expensive in terms of human and capital resources. Some of the costs are: preparation of new course materials, acquisition of sophisticated equipment and software, and maintenance of a low student/faculty ratio. In addition, MSE students and faculty have special needs, such as technical background and familiarity with current industrial practices. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching a Software Design Methodology

    Page(s): 1156 - 1163
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    This paper describes an approach to teaching a software design methodology used at The Wang Institute of Graduate Studies. The approach is general enough to be used with any of the currently popular design methodologies. Students are first taught the principles underlying the methodology, and the standards used with it. This phase is done in a series of lectures. In the second phase, students are presented with a real design problem, and asked to solve it using the methodology. They are monitored in this process by an expert in the methodology whose job is to assure that the students adhere to the methodology, but who makes no design decisions. View full abstract»

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  • Exercises in Software Design

    Page(s): 1164 - 1169
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    Typical software engineering courses teach principles in lectures and readings, then apply them in the development of a single program (requiring several months). We recently taught a software engineering class that incorporated many smaller exercises (requiring several hours). The class was successful: students were able to experiment with a broad set of ideas, and make interesting mistakes without jeopardizing the grades of their development team. This paper describes some tools and techniques we taught, and suggests how they might be incorporated into typical software engineering classes. View full abstract»

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  • Two Complementary Course Sequences on the Design and Implementation of Software Products

    Page(s): 1170 - 1175
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    For many students, the first chance to produce software as part of a team comes with the first work experience outside a university. The difficulties of working with others are compounded by the problems of working in a new environment and for a client with ambiguous and changing goals. Although it is difficult to approximate the "real world" accurately in an academic course, we have implemented two full-year course sequences which apparently give our students some insight into the problems they will face when they leave the university. One course requires the development and implementation of a software product by a team of undergraduates, and the other requires experienced graduate students to act as supervisors for the undergraduate projects. We describe the content and structure of these two sequences, emphasizing how they support and enhance each other. We believe other curricula would benefit from similar courses. View full abstract»

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  • Software Projects in an Academic Environment

    Page(s): 1176 - 1181
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    The "software hut" is a course project that is used in conjunction with a graduate-level course in software engineering. The purpose of this project is to give the students some "real world" experience with the design and implementation of software. This paper describes the author's experience in using such a project and presents some suggestions on how a project should be organized. View full abstract»

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  • Experience with a Software Engineering Project Course

    Page(s): 1182 - 1192
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    This paper presents an approach to meeting the academic objectives of advanced software engineering project courses. The objectives are increased competence and confidence of the students in carrying out software development projects. The academic context includes a simulated industrial context. Part of the industrial context consists of industrial roles played for the student team by the instructor and others. The project itself is divided into tasks related to deliverables and collateral responsibilities. The software production model is a combination of the waterfall, iterative enhancement, and document-driven techniques. A software development environment is mentioned although the details are presented elsewhere. Further detail is given for five project courses conducted by the author. View full abstract»

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  • Components of Typical Undergraduate Software Engineering Courses: Results from a Survey

    Page(s): 1193 - 1198
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    A survey of undergraduate software engineering courses was conducted. The survey covered the issues of course level, course content, course organization, project characteristics, and department demographics. The descriptive statistics show that the typical course focuses on the software development life cycle and includes a project intended for actual use. The project is carried out by teams of students, with student leaders. A factor analysis disclosed that three different sorts of courses are currently being offered. The most predominant course is the Later-Life Cycle course, which focuses on the later stages of the software life cycle. Detailed design, coding, testing, and maintenance receive in-depth coverage in this style of course, and the student's grades are heavily dependent upon the project. The Early-Life-Cycle course emphasizes requirements analysis, specification, and system design. Written reports are an important component of this course, and the project is again a large portion of the students' grades. The third style of course is the Theoretical-Issues course. Software metrics, project management, and legal and ethical issues are covered. The students are upper level, and they use journal articles as a source of materials. The issues of suitable textbooks and sources of materials and training for teaching user-interface design surfaced as problem areas. View full abstract»

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  • Technology Selection: An Educational Approach

    Page(s): 1199 - 1206
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    Creating and enhancing a software engineering work force requires several different types of continuing education for software professionals, including: task-oriented education, enhancement-oriented education and selection-oriented education. In this paper, we focus on the important, but often neglected, category of selection-oriented education. We begin with a discussion of technology selection, indicating what it involves, how it contributes to improving the state of practice, and why it is key to technology improvement in general. This is followed by a discussion of some criteria for selection-oriented education programs. We then describe the selection-oriented education activities at the Rocky Mountain Institute of Software Engineering and relate some problems encountered in establishing these activities. View full abstract»

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  • IAI Corporate Software Engineering Training and Education Program

    Page(s): 1207 - 1216
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    Israel Aircraft Industries has developed a comprehensive educational program in software engineering. Goals of the program include: the retraining of college graduates to become software engineers with specializations in one of three application areas (data processing, embedded computer systems, and CAD/CAM systems), and enhancement of the knowledge of currently practicing software engineers. The program is centered around three distinct full-time courses of study having an average duration of 7 months. The training program also includes a large number of short courses and seminars. The company is currently planning an M.Sc. program in embedded computer systems and software engineering in cooperation with one of the universities in Israel. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Page(s): 1216-a
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  • The Computer Society

    Page(s): 1216-b
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org