By Topic

IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 3 • Date March 1985

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): c1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (322 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): c2
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Foreword

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 241
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (1472 KB)
    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Exception Handling: Formal Specification and Systematic Program Construction

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):242 - 252
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4856 KB)

    We present an algebraic specification language (PLUSS) and a program construction method. Programs are built systematically from an algebraic specification of the data they deal with. The method was tested on a realistic problem (part of a telephone switching system). In these experiments, it turned out that error handling was the difficult part to specify and to program. This paper shows how to c... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Software Engineering for User Interfaces

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):252 - 258
    Cited by:  Papers (29)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4136 KB)

    The discipline of software engineering can be extended in a natural way to deal with the issues raised by a systematic approach to the design of human-machine interfaces. Two main points are made: that the user should be treated as part of the system being designed, and that projects should be organized to take account of the current (small) state of a priori knowledge about how to design interfac... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Modular Structure of Complex Systems

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):259 - 266
    Cited by:  Papers (116)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2856 KB)

    This paper discusses the organization of software that is inherently complex because of very many arbitrary details that must be precisely right for the software to be correct. We show how the software design technique known as information hiding, or abstraction, can be supplemented by a hierarchically structured document, which we call a module guide. The guide is intended to allow both designers... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • PROUST: Knowledge-Based Program Understanding

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):267 - 275
    Cited by:  Papers (116)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2896 KB)

    This paper describes a program called PROUST which does on-line analysis and understanding of Pascal written by novice programmers. PROUST takes as input a program and a nonalgorithmic description of the program requirements, and finds the most likely mapping between the requirements and the code. This mapping is in essence a reconstruction of the design and implementation steps that the programme... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • PECAN: Program Development Systems that Support Multiple Views

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):276 - 285
    Cited by:  Papers (87)  |  Patents (17)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3176 KB)

    This paper describes the PECAN family of program development systems. PECAN supports multiple views of the user's program. The views can be representations of the program or of the corresponding semantics. The primary program view is a syntax-directed editor. The current semantic views include expression trees, data type diagrams, flow graphs, and the symbol table. PECAN is designed to make effect... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Tour Through Cedar

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):285 - 302
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6104 KB)

    This paperlintroduces the reader to many of the salient features of the Cedar programming environment, a state-of-the-art progrmming system that combines in a single integrated environment: high quality graphics, a sophisticated editor and document preparation facility, and a variety of tools for the programmer to use in the construction and debugging of his programs. The Cedar programm... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Steps to an Advanced Ada1Programming Environment

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):302 - 310
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2928 KB)

    Conceptual simplicity, tight coupling of tools, and effective support of host-target software development will characterize advanced Ada programming support environments. Several important principles have been demonstrated in the Arcturus system, including template-assisted Ada editing, command completion using Ada as a command language, and combining the advantages of interpretation and compilati... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Advance Program

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):311 - 313
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (369 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 314
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 315
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (222 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Beyond the Basics: A Software Publication Series for Successful Computer Professionals From the IEEE Computer Society

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 315-a
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (1408 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 315-b
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for Papers and Panel Session Proposals

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 315
    Request permission for commercial reuse | PDF file iconPDF (1043 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org