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Proceedings of the IRE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1946

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Proceedings of the IRE

    Page(s): nil1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): nil2
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  • General Information

    Page(s): nil2
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  • Contents of Volume 34 - 1946

    Page(s): 1 - 5
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  • Index to book reviews

    Page(s): 5
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  • Index to authors

    Page(s): 6
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  • Index to subjects

    Page(s): 7 - 12
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  • Nontechnical index

    Page(s): 13 - 16
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1p
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  • 1946

    Page(s): 2p
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  • A New Method of Amplifying with High Efficiency a Carrier Wave Modulated in Amplitude by a Voice Wave

    Page(s): 3p - 13p
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    This paper describes a new high-efficiency amplifier circuit with a quantitative analysis of its operation. This circuit operates by dividing the wave in several sections, amplifying each section separately and recombining the sections in the output to produce a larger wave of the original form. The circuit has special application to controlled-carrier systems and relatively high efficiencies are obtained, the companson with conventional arrangements being most favorable at low modulation levels. View full abstract»

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  • The Transverse Electric Modes in Coaxial Cavities

    Page(s): 14p - 17p
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    Some thought on the transverse electric modes in resonant coaxial cavities labeled TE1,0,1, TE1,0,2, TE2,0,1, TE3,0,1, etc., by Barrow and Mieher suggested several conclusions which are perhaps implicit in their paper but which deserve explicit consideration. In addition, the notation and the diagrams of the electric field configurations of these modes, as presented in that reference, cause misconceptions and confusion which subsequent papers and even textbooks are perpetuating. Actually, the transverse electric modes whose middle subscript is zero do not exist. They are limiting cases and are approached by the fields of the coaxial modes TE1,1,1, TE1,1,2, TE2,1,1, TE3,1,1, etc., respectively, as the ratio of the radii of the inner and outer conductors approaches 1. Several facts about the behavior of these modes for varying values of this ratio are presented. In particular, for a given mode, the resonant frequency of a coaxial cavity decreases as the ratio increases. In the case of a cavity of infinite length (i.e., a wave guide) the corresponding wavelengths (i.e., the critical wavelengths of the guides) approach the circumference of the cavity divided by the first subscript of the mode. Physical and mathematical arguments confirm these conclusions and make clear to what extent the Barrow and Mieher diagrams of the modes TE1,0,1, TE1,0,2, etc., are representative of actual coaxial modes. The practical importance of the transverse electric coaxial modes in ultra-high-frequency work is emphasized. View full abstract»

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  • Radio-Frequency Spectrum Analyzers

    Page(s): 18p - 22p
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    The resolving power of radio-frequency spectrum analyzers of the continuously tuned type is defined as the width in frequency, at points 3 decibels down, of the trace of a continuous-wave signal. The optimum resolving power is 1.3√F/T, in which F is the frequency band scanned, and T the period of one scan. Traces of pulse-modulated, frequency-modulated, and amplitude-modulated signals are illustrated to show effect of resolving power. View full abstract»

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  • Principal and Complementary Waves in Antennas

    Page(s): 23p - 32p
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    In response to an increased interest in mathematical aspects of antenna theory, this paper presents details of analysis of cylindrical and other nonconical antennas as a supplement to a previous paper containing the outline of the method and the main results. In the course of the present discussion the theory of principal waves on cylindrical conductors is extended to include the case in which the diameter is not small compared with the wavelength. View full abstract»

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  • Probe Error in Standing-Wave Detectors

    Page(s): 33p - 44p
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    Distorted patterns which are observed in standing-wave detectors with deeper probe penetrations are shown to be attributable to reflections at the probe wire. It is demonstrated that the probe, over a wide range of penetrations, acts as a simple shunt admittance across the transmission line. The mathematical and graphical treatment developed on this basis gives a satisfactory account of observed probe patterns, and makes it possible to obtain exact readings even from badly distorted patterns. By applying the results, one is in a position to improve the sensitivity of standing-wave measurements at low-power levels without sacrifice in accuracy, simply by using much deeper probe penetrations. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 45p - 46p
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1962. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope