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Proceedings of the IRE

Issue 5 • Date May 1943

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1 - c2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): i
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  • The Institute of Radio Engineers Incorporated

    Page(s): ii
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  • Book Previews and Monographs

    Page(s): 191
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  • Design for Blitz

    Page(s): 192 - 193
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  • Nikola Tesla 1857-1943

    Page(s): 194
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  • Cathode-Ray Control of Television Light Valves

    Page(s): 195 - 208
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    When a light valve is employed for the reproduction of television pictures, it is desirable to make use of a cathode-ray beam to control the light valve in order to preserve the all-electronic character of the television system. A number of procedures of cathode-ray control are described, the majority of which are applicable particularly to the control of the suspension light valve. The general method employed is shown to be the production of an electric field through the light valve by bombarding one side of the valve with electrons of very high velocity, causing the valve areas to be charged in a negative direction toward the limiting potential of the bombarded surface. Removal of the electric field is then accomplished by charging these areas back toward their original potential by the use of electrons of substantially reduced velocity. The most elementary procedure described is one in which a single beam of electrons of constant velocity is employed, discharge being accomplished by secondary electrons generated by the action of the beam of primary electrons. The effects of polarization of the light valve, resulting from the comparatively low resistivity of the suspension, are described and explained. It is shown that a suspension of such low resistivity as to be uncontrollable by the other procedures may be made operative when the valve is used in combination with a spatially modulated electron spray and when, in addition, the potential of one wall of the valve is increased and decreased at a moderate frequency. View full abstract»

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  • A Type of Light Valve for Television Reproduction

    Page(s): 208 - 214
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    The desirability of a light valve for the reproduction of television pictures is discussed, and the use of a suspension of opaque platelike particles for this purpose is shown to offer the particular advantages that the electron beam would be only a control mechanism and the picture brightness would be limited only by the light source and lens system. The theory of operation of such a suspension is described and it is demonstrated that inertial effects may be neglected and that the rate of orientation of the particles is independent of particle size and is a function of the viscosity and dielectric constant of the suspending medium and of the square of the applied voltage. The contrast ratio obtained may be made very high, although the optical efficiency will decline as the contrast ratio rises. It is found that suspension resistivity must be considered in practical application of the light valve, for if the field is applied through an insulating wall the valve will respond only to changes in potential of the outside of this wall, since leakage will prevent a constant wall potential from maintaining a field across the suspension. From the results of tests, the conclusions are drawn that the fundamental optical behavior of the suspensions considered is in accordance with the predictions of a theory based on simple assumptions, and that the suspensions fulfill the basic requirements of a television light valve. View full abstract»

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  • Optimum Current Distributions on Vertical Antennas

    Page(s): 214 - 232
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    The theoretical optimum current distribution on a vertical antenna of given length is defined as that current distribution giving the maximum possible field strength on the horizon for a given power output. The problem of determining such distributions is set up as a problem in the calculus of variations, and solution functions are derived for antennas varying in length from one eighth of a wavelength up to a full wavelength. It is shown that the apparent antenna performance obtained with the theoretical optimum distribution is as good as or better than that obtained with any practical distribution, and thus serves to bound the improvement in antenna performance which may be expected as a result of changes in current distribution. A curve of maximum possible field strength on the horizon for fixed power output versus antenna height is given. Finally, these theoretical optimum current distributions are used to indicate the general class of distributions most likely to yield worth-while results in a search for practical optimum distributions. Several such practical distributions are considered in detail. View full abstract»

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  • Corrections

    Page(s): 232
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  • Network Theory, Filters, and Equalizers

    Page(s): 233 - 240
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    Resistance attenuators of the T, L, ladder, and bridged-T types are considered, and design formulas are given. Decimal attenuators are described. The relation existing between attenuation and phase shift in a four-terminal network is stated in several forms, including the phase-area theorem, and a formula which gives phase shift directly as a function of the rate of change of attenuation. The latter shows that the phase shift that exists at a particular frequency is determined primarily by the way in which the slope of the attentuation characteristic varies in the vicinity of this frequency. Consideration is also given to the case where the desired attenuation is constant over a portion of the frequency spectrum, while the phase shift is to be kept constant over the remainder of the spectrum. It is shown that a complete phase and attenuation characteristic is specified when such attenuation and phase fragments are given. This case corresponds to the transmission characteristics desired in the feedback loop of an ideal feedback amplifier. The application of these principles to the design of practical feedback amplifier circuits is considered in detail. It is shown that nonoscillating feedback amplifiers can be designed by considering only the transmission characteristics of the feedback loop, since the transmission characteristics control the phase shift. View full abstract»

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  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 241 - 245
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  • Book Preview

    Page(s): 245
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  • Books

    Page(s): 245
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 246
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  • Section meetings

    Page(s): xxviii - xxx
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  • Membership

    Page(s): xxx - xl
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  • New Equipment Notes

    Page(s): xl - xlviii
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  • Standards for Home Radio Replacement Parts

    Page(s): xliv - lx
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  • Army-Navy "E" Honor Roll

    Page(s): xlvi
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  • Positions open

    Page(s): l - lviii
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1962. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope