By Topic

Proceedings of the IRE

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1941

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1 - c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1413 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): nil1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Institute of Radio Engineers Incorporated

    Page(s): nil2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information about the Society

    Page(s): nil3 - nil4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Television-The Scanning Process

    Page(s): 529 - 537
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2168 KB)  

    This is a descriptive study of the scanning process in television. It is analyzed in terms of a two-dimensional Fourier series of terms, which are correlated to the frequency components of the transmitted electrical signal. The impairment caused to the detail in the picture by the scanning process is shown to consist of two parts: (a) a blurring of the original image, and (b) the introduction of spurious patterns not in the original picture. A discussion is given of how these influence the reproduction of detail in the vertical and horizontal directions, and their relative importance in impairing the picture. A brief discussion is also given of impairments to the over-all picture caused by the scanning process, chiefly from the intermittent nature of the process. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Commercial 50-Kilowatt Frequency-Modulation Broadcast Transmitting Station

    Page(s): 537 - 545
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6288 KB)  

    A 50-kilowatt frequency-modulation broadcast transmitting station is described. The entire equipment was designed considering simplicity and reliability to be of prime importance. The transmitter consists of a 250-watt exciter, a 3-kilowatt intermediate power amplifier and a 50-kilowatt power amplifier completely self-contained except for the main-rectifier plate transformer, water-cooling unit, and console. Most of the performance characteristics of the transmitter, including fidelity, noise level, and frequency stability, are determined in the exciter unit, where several novel features are incorporated for producing the excellent performance obtained. The 3-kilowatt intermediate power amplifier utilizes forced-air-cooled triodes, while water-cooled triodes are used in the power amplifier. Both tube types are of a new design especially suited to ultra-high-frequency service. An inverse feedback circuit is provided around the final amplifier stage, grid-modulating this stage so as to cancel filament hum. A new design of 3-bay turnstile antenna is fed by a pair of 2⅝-inch concentric-tube radio-frequency transmission lines. Field strength contours are given to show the coverage expected from the new transmitter, which is located at a high elevation in the Helderberg Mountains west of Albany so as to give line-of-sight transmission to most of the area to be served. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Intermediate-Frequency Values for Frequency-Modulated-Wave Receivers

    Page(s): 546 - 551
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1864 KB)  

    The selection of an intermediate frequency for a super-heterodyne receiver involves consideration of the signal frequency, the tuning range, the pass-band width, the minimizing of spurious responses, regeneration stability, and frequency stability. The consideration of the frequency-modulation broadcast band of 42 to 50 megacycles illustrates the manner in which these several factors affect the choice of intermediate frequency. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Factory Alignment Equipment for Frequency-Modulation Receivers

    Page(s): 551 - 554
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2656 KB)  

    A description of some of the problems arising in the alignment of frequency-modulated receivers is given and a method of meeting these problems with a minimum of difficulty and complexity is shown. The method adopted is that of providing a central signal-generating equipment with a number of remote alignment positions with individual attenuators and oscilloscopes. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Full-Wave Voltage-Doubling Rectifier Circuit

    Page(s): 554 - 558
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (888 KB)  

    An analysis of the full-wave voltage-doubling rectifier circuit is made in this paper with the main assumption that the tube drop is zero when conducting. Both the output and the input performance characteristics of the circuit are presented, and several of the characteristics are compared with experimental results. The analysis shows that polarized electrolytic condensers may be used if the circuit is not loaded too heavily. The currents to be expected on short circuit are also discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Inductively Coupled Frequency Modulator

    Page(s): 559 - 563
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1128 KB)  

    The frequency modulator described here allows the engineer to design a frequency-modulated oscillator that has more power output and will operate on a higher fundamental frequency than conventional modulators in use at present. It consists of an inductance, capacitance, and resistance in parallel coupled inductively to the frequency-controlling circuit of the self-excited oscillator. Variations in the parallel resistance refect reactance and resistance changes into the oscillator inductance thereby causing frequency variations. In the experimental setup used, the parallel resistance is the plate circuit of a 6F6 tube. Variations in the alternating-current plate resistance of the 6F6 tube are accentuated by the proper placement of a resistor in the plate circuit. Calculated curves are given showing the variations of the introduced reactance and resistance as the parallel resistance is varied. Experimental curves are given showing the performance of the system at 2.5 megacycles. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 565 - 568
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2093 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Books

    Page(s): 568
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Committee Personnel - 1941

    Page(s): 568 - 569
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (417 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Institute Representatives in Colleges

    Page(s): 569 - 570
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (413 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Institute Representatives on Other Bodies

    Page(s): 570
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (229 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contributors

    Page(s): 571 - 572
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1764 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Positions open

    Page(s): vi
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1043 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1962. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope