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NanoBioscience, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
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  • Whole-Cell Sensing for a Harmful Bloom-Forming Microscopic Alga by Measuring Antibody–Antigen Forces

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 149 - 156
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1375 KB)  

    Aureococcus anophagefferens, a harmful bloom-forming alga responsible for brown tides in estuaries of the Middle Atlantic U.S., has been investigated by atomic force microscopy for the first time, using probes functionalized with a monoclonal antibody specific for the alga. The rupture force between a single monoclonal antibody and the surface of A. anophagefferens was experimentally found to be 246 plusmn 11 pN at the load rate of 12 nN/s. Force histograms for A. anophagefferens and other similarly-sized algae are presented and analyzed. The results illustrate the effects of load rates, and demonstrate that force-distance measurements can be used to build biosensors with high signal-to-noise ratios for A. anophagefferens. The methods described in this paper can be used, in principle, to construct sensors with single-cell resolution for arbitrary cells for which monoclonal antibodies are available View full abstract»

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  • Effect of Pore Size on the Calculated Pressure at Biological Cells Pore Wall

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 157 - 163
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (615 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A transient nonlinear finite-element program has been used to calculate the electric field distribution as a function of time for a spherical cell with a pore in a conducting medium during application of a subnanosecond rise time "step" wave, including the effects of dipolar saturation in the water-based cytoplasm and cell medium. The time-dependent pressure on the pore wall has been computed as a function of time as the system polarizes from the change of the energy in the electric field to the left (inside the pore) and to the right (inside the membrane) of the pore wall. The computations suggest that dipolar saturation, while significant, has little effect on the time-dependent electric field distribution but a substantial effect on the field-induced pore wall pressure. Also, the effect of pore size on both the computed electric field and field-induced pressure was studied. As the pore size increases, a collapse in both the electric field and field-induced pressure has been noticed. This suggests that as the pore size increases, the driving force for further opening the pore is not electrical View full abstract»

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  • Application of the Taguchi Method to the Analysis of the Deposition Step in Microarray Production

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 164 - 172
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1211 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Every microarray experiment is affected by many possible sources of variability that may even corrupt biological evidence on analyzed sequences. We applied a "Taguchi method" strategy, based on the use of orthogonal arrays to optimize the deposition step of oligonucleotide sequences on glass slides. We chose three critical deposition parameters (humidity, surface, and buffer) at two levels each, in order to establish optimum settings. A L8 orthogonal array was used in order to monitor both the main effects and interactions on the deposition of a 25 mer oligonucleotide hybridized to its fluorescent-labeled complementary. Signal-background ratio and deposition homogeneity in terms of mean intensity and spot diameter were considered as significant outputs. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to raw data and to mean results for each slide and experimental run. Finally we calculated an overall evaluation coefficient to group together important outputs in one number. Environmental humidity and surface-buffer interaction were recognized as the most critical factors, for which a 50% humidity, associated to a chitosan-covered slide and a sodium phosphate + 25% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) buffer gave best performances. Our results also suggested that Taguchi methods can be efficiently applied in optimization of microarray procedures View full abstract»

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  • Principles and Design of a Novel Magnetic Force Mechanical Conditioning Bioreactor for Tissue Engineering, Stem Cell Conditioning, and Dynamic In Vitro Screening

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 173 - 177
    Cited by:  Papers (20)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1767 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mechanical conditioning of cells and tissue constructs in bioreactors is an important factor in determining the properties of tissue being produced. Mechanical conditioning within a bioreactor environment, however, has proven difficult. This paper presents the theoretical basis, design, and initial results of a mechanical conditioning system for cell and tissue culture which is based on biocompatible magnetic micro- and nanoparticles acting as a remote stress mechanism without invasion of the sterile bioreactor environment View full abstract»

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  • All-Optical Switching in Pharaonis Phoborhodopsin Protein Molecules

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 178 - 187
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (750 KB)  

    Low-power all-optical switching with pharaonis phoborhodopsin (ppR) protein is demonstrated based on nonlinear excited-state absorption at different wavelengths. A modulating pulsed 532-nm laser beam is shown to switch the transmission of a continuous-wave signal light beam at: 1) 390 nm; 2) 500 nm; 3) 560 nm; and 4) 600 nm, respectively. Simulations based on the rate equation approach considering all seven states in the ppR photocycle are in good agreement with experimental results. It is shown that the switching characteristics at 560 and 600 nm, respectively, can exhibit negative to positive switching. The switching characteristics at 500 nm can be inverted by increasing the signal beam intensity. The profile of switched signal beam is also sensitive to the modulating pulse frequency and signal beam intensity and wavelength. The switching characteristics are also shown to be sensitive to the lifetimes of ppRM and ppRO intermediates. The results show the applicability of ppR as a low-power wavelength tunable all-optical switch View full abstract»

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  • Forming Microstructured Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers on Gold by Laser Ablation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 188 - 192
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1175 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A process to form microstructured alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is described. It is well known that alkanethiols spontaneously form homogenous SAMs on gold surfaces. By means of laser ablation, the exposed areas of alkanethiol monolayers can be removed from the gold surface. Free gold is obtained which can react further with second and third thiols. By this technique, structured alkanethiol SAMs are obtained reliably and easily. In a rather narrow window of pulse intensities, in our example 120 MW/cm2plusmn10% from a frequency-doubled Nd :YVO4 laser with 6-ns pulsewidth operating at a repetition rate of 20 kHz, ablation of alkanethiol monolayers is obtained without causing any damage to the gold substrate. Examples are presented where lines down to 10 mum in width were laser ablated into an SAM formed either from a hydrophilic or a hydrophobic alkanethiol and filled with a monolayer of a second alkanethiol of opposite hydrophilicity. The patterned structures were examined by optical and fluorescence microscopy as well as by lateral force microscopy. The presented method enables the preparation of microstructured SAMs on gold and probably on a wide variety of other substrates View full abstract»

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  • Transient Block of Receptor May Be a Mechanism Controlling Unidirectional Propagation of Signaling

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 193 - 203
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (500 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In tissue development, juxtacrine signaling often propagates across cells, carrying and delivering temporal and spatial information for cells to make correct patterning. Observed complex and accurate tissue patterning indicates that signaling propagation via ligand-receptor interactions is precisely controlled. It is important and interesting to reveal the possible control mechanisms. The directionality of signaling in cells, which is a common issue for all intercellular signaling pathways, is a critical aspect. To understand the propagation of Notch signaling in presomitic mesoderm cells in the mouse, a novel method is used to build a multicellular model to simulate Notch signaling. Simulation reveals that the transient block of Notch by Notch induced Lfng and the delayed removal of the block by another Notch induced protein Hes7 may explain the observed unidirectional propagation of Notch signaling in these cells. Both mutation in and overexpression of lfng cause the same signaling profile in the tissue, due to the inappropriate timing of Notch signaling block by Lfng. The reverse Notch/Delta signaling quickly develops into reciprocating signaling among cells, causing irregular expression of cyclic genes. Irregular Notch signaling in cells would change their response to the positional information provided by the Fgf8 gradient, resulting in disordered and irregular somite segmentation. As Notch signaling is highly conserved, we hypothesize that the mechanism of controlling unidirectional propagation of signaling in cells by transient receptor block may exist in other tissues and in other vertebrates. Our simulation results also suggest that segmentation clock and unidirectional propagation may be inherently coupled in Notch signaling View full abstract»

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  • Using Carbon Nanotubes to Absorb Low-Concentration Hydrogen Sulfide in Fluid

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 204 - 209
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (645 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Hydrogen sulfide is a colorless and flammable gas under room temperature. Usually hydrogen sulfide is considered to be toxic; however, the recent research revealed that hydrogen sulfide in the cardiovascular system plays the role of a vascular dilator. The physiological role of hydrogen sulfide depends on its in vivo level. As such, the measurement of hydrogen sulfide with nano-quantity resolution becomes an important subject. Existing methods generally require bulky samples and are invasive and offline. It will be significantly helpful to measure hydrogen sulfide with a small amount of tissue in a noninvasive method The first attempt was to take a blood or serum sample with a trace amount to examine the interaction between hydrogen sulfide and carbon nanotube. The carbon nanotube is chosen because of a known fact that hydrogen sulfide can be adsorbed by activated carbon. The carbon nanotube is an excellent activated carbon in this regard. Fluorescence intensity of the carbon nanotube with and without immersion of it in a hydrogen sulfide medium was examined in the study. It was found that the intensities increase as the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide increase. Furthermore, the concentration of 10 muM hydrogen sulfide in water was successfully measured View full abstract»

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  • Biological Crystallization of Self-Aligned Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 210 - 214
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1550 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Crystal growth and magnetic behavior of iron oxide nanoparticles assembled with biomolecules have been investigated. The nanoparticles assembled with trypsin molecules exhibit superparamagnetism at room temperature with blocking temperature (~80 K) significantly lower than those without trypsin (~140 K). This is attributed to reduced magnetostatic couplings between particles due to increased distance between particles separated by trypsin molecules. Moreover, the synthesized nanoparticle-biomolecule assemblies consist of a unique one-dimensional self-assembled arrays of nanoparticles found by structural analysis using transmission electron microscopy. The moire fringes observed from the particle arrays indicate that the particles are aligned with slight misorientation of their crystallographic axes. Such an unusual formation of nanoparticle arrays may be relevant to specific ligand sites in trypsin molecules and the magnetostatic interparticle couplings View full abstract»

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  • Light-Induced In Situ Patterning of DNA-Tagged Biomolecules and Nanoparticles

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 215 - 219
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (707 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present an in situ method for the selective manipulation of DNA-tagged nano-objects such as vesicles or gold colloids in aqueous solution, at neutral pH. The method makes use of the photosensitizer concept found in photodynamic therapy. Here, single-stranded DNA is immobilized onto a surface via the biotin/streptavidin linkage. If the streptavidin is fluorescently labeled, reactive species will be created during laser-induced photobleaching of the label. These reactive species can then completely or partly suppress the DNA hybridization and cause the removal of the streptavidin. The technique thereby enables a dynamic on-off control over surface density of immobilized DNA-tagged nano-objects. Furthermore, combining this in situ manipulation of DNA with prepatterning of single-stranded DNA in the micro and later in the nano range provides a means for the dynamic patterning required for applications in biosensing and nanotechnology View full abstract»

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  • 3rd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 220
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  • IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c3
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  • Blank page [back cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on NanoBioscience publishes basic and applied papers dealing both with engineering, physics, chemistry, modeling and computer science and with biology and medicine with respect to molecules, cells, tissues. The content of acceptable papers ranges from practical/clinical/environmental applications to formalized mathematical theory.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Henry Hess
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Columbia University