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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1934

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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Institute of Radio Engineers - Forthcoming Meetings

    Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Page(s): i
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  • General Information

    Page(s): ii
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  • Institute sections

    Page(s): iii
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  • Geographical Location of Members Elected August 1, 1934

    Page(s): iv
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  • Applications for Membership

    Page(s): v
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1934

    Page(s): vi
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  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 1045 - 1049
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  • Errata

    Page(s): 1050
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  • Addenda

    Page(s): 1050
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  • A "Short-Cut" Method for Calculation of Harmonic Distortion in Wave Modulation

    Page(s): 1090 - 1101
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    Precalculation of harmonic distortion produced by vacuum tubes used in all stages of a class B audio amplifier, for a great variety of operating conditions, is an important item in the work of the radio design engineer. A graphial method for this and similar calculations, which gives considerable saving of time has been developed. It is applicable to all symmetrical periodic curves containing harmonic components plotted to the sine of the fundamental frequency, sin ωt. The procedure consists in connecting the ends of such a curve by a straight line and measuring the ordinate differences between the curve and the chord for five definite values of abscissas. Simple expressions allow, then, for a rapid calculation of harmonic components up to 11th order. The method has proved to be very useful in class B modulator design. View full abstract»

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  • Report of Ionosphere Investigations at the Huancayo Magnetic Observatory (Peru) during 1933

    Page(s): 1102 - 1123
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    Equipment for ionosphere investigation was placed in operation at the Huancayo Magnetic Observatory of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington during 1933. The equipment designed for multifrequency operation by manual methods is described. Three layers identified with the E, F1, and F2layers at Washington, D.C., are found. The F1layer appears to be formed by a separation from a general F region during the morning rather than direct ionization of a separate layer. Two reflection components are found near the maximum ionization of the F1and F2layers, reaching critical values at different frequencies. This difference corresponds very closely to the separation calculated for the effect of magneto-ionic double refraction due to the earth's magnetic field. From these data further information of the actual ionization conditions is obtained. The maximum ionization of the F1layer is found to reach 2.5×105electrons per cubic centimeter, while the density of heavier ions is not greater than about 107per cubic centimeter. The maximum ionization of the F2layer reaches 8×105to 9×105electrons per cubic centimeter and on some occasions exceeds 1.1×106electrons per cubic centimeter. A dip in the critical frequency of the F2layer usually occurs in the morning in the summer, which may be related to the appearance of the F1layer. If this dip in the diurnal critical frequency characteristic is due to absorption rather than ion limitation, the ionization may be higher than indicated during these periods. View full abstract»

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  • Measurements of Electrical State of Upper Stratosphere in Polar Regions (Kennelly-Heaviside Layer)

    Page(s): 1124 - 1138
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    In this paper are described the results of wireless observations made in connection with the International Polar Year 1932-1933 at Moormansk (latitude 68°56′ N; longitude 33°05′ E) in the U.S.S.R. This work was done by the Leningrad Section of the Institute for Scientific Research of the People's Commissariat for Communication in common with the Central Geophysical Observatory under the direction of the author. A special system with two 150-watt tubes was designed in order to send out short pulses of 20-kilowatt peak power. This was accomplished by using a condenser charged to high tension by a rectifier. By means of a rotary spark gap this condenser was discharged fifty times per second through the plate circuit of the tube oscillator, in which short oscillations of great power were thus produced. The rest of the time the condenser was not connected to the oscillator and the charge was gradually stored up. Thanks to this method it was possible to carry out experiments under expeditionary conditions, using but a small power. The observations were made with a cathode ray tube, the current of a small alternator, driven on the same shaft as the transmitter discharger, causing a circular motion of the spot on the tube. The transmitter and receiver were separated by a distance of three kilometers and linked by wire. Records are given of measurements on several days of June, July, and August, 1933, as well as a classification of observed phenomena. View full abstract»

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  • Book reviews

    Page(s): 1141 - 1143
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  • Contributors to this issue

    Page(s): 1144 - 1145
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope