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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 1934

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  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Institute of Radio Engineers - Forthcoming Meetings

    Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Page(s): i
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  • General Information

    Page(s): ii
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  • Institute sections

    Page(s): iii
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  • Geographical Location of Members Elected October 3, 1934

    Page(s): iv
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  • Applications for Membership

    Page(s): v
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1934

    Page(s): vi
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  • John Ambrosh Fleming Recipient, Institute Medal of Honor, 1933

    Page(s): 1232 - 1233
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  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 1235 - 1240
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  • An Experimental Television System: Part I-Introduction

    Page(s): 1241 - 1245
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    During the first part of 1933 a complete experimental television system was placed in operation in Camden, New Jersey. Practical tests were made under conditions as nearly as possible in keeping with probable television broadcast service. Program material was obtained from studio pick-up and outdoor pick-up. The outdoor pick-up was from a point a mile from the studio and transmitter. In addition, a studio program originating in the Empire State Building in New York was relayed to Camden by radio and broadcast in Camden. The transmitter used an iconoscope as the pick-up element and the receiver a kinescope as the reproducing element. This paper is an introduction to a group of three papers which describe the transmitter terminal equipment and the transmitter, the New York-to-Camden radio relay circuit, and the receiver apparatus. View full abstract»

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  • An Experimental Television System: Part II-The Transmitter

    Page(s): 1246 - 1265
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    A description is given of an experimental television pick-up and transmitting installation which used a special form of cathode ray tube, the iconoscope, as the signal generating device. The installation included facilities for remote pick-up of outdoor scenes and the relaying of programs by radio. The transmitted subject matter for the tests included motion picture film, studio scenes, and outdoor scenes. Description is given of video frequency amplifiers having uniform frequency response from about 20 cycles to 600,000 cycles per second. Discussions are given on several of the problems which arose in the use of the iconoscope. View full abstract»

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  • An Experimental Television System: Part III-The Receivers

    Page(s): 1266 - 1285
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    Several television receivers were built and operated as a part of the experimental television system set up in Camden during the early part of 1933. The receiver arrangements, including sound, picture, sychronizing, and deflecting circuits are described together with some of the factors influencing the design. The performance of the receivers is discussed and characteristic curves are given. View full abstract»

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  • An Experimental Television System: Part IV-The Radio Relay Link for Telivision Signals

    Page(s): 1286 - 1294
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    A radio relay circuit is described for carrying 120-line television programs from a studio in New York to a broadcast station in Camden, New Jersey. Details of the actual relay station used are given as well as the characteristics of directive antennas especially designed for this service. The completed system satisfactorily relayed television pictures over this 86-mile distance. The project was carried out jointly by the following companies: RCA Communications, Inc., RCA Victor Company, Inc., National Broadcasting Company, Inc., General Electric Company, Inc., and the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company. View full abstract»

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  • The Sound Prism

    Page(s): 1295 - 1310
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    The methods of sound analysis used at present are classified into those in which an analyzing operation is performed upon a photographic record of the wave and those in which the wave is analyzed as it is being produced. It is pointed out that the methods of the first group are very laborious and that those of the second group are slow in action, making them unsuitable for analyzing sounds of relatively short duration such as those produced by persons. The need for a device to perform a rapid analysis is indicated. A new rapid acting heterodyne wave analyzer called the "Sound Prism" is described and its operation is illustrated. The frequency spectrum is repeatedly traced on a translucent screen by a spot of light at such a rate that persistence of vision allows the eye to see the path of the spot as a steady line on the screen. The frequency spectrum is thus shown almost instantaneously so that changes in the spectrum may be continuously followed by the eye as the composition of the sound changes and the ear hears the change in quality. Sample records of analyses are given and a brief description of the work already done in the field of musical tone analysis is presented. The limitations of the sound prism in regard to resolution and speed are discussed and plans for further development are outlined. View full abstract»

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  • Book reviews

    Page(s): 1315 - 1317
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  • Contributors to this issue

    Page(s): 1318 - 1319
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  • Memo [upcomming Rochster Fall Meeting]

    Page(s): xxii
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope