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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 1933

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Institute of Radio Engineers - Forthcoming Meetings

    Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Page(s): i
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  • General Information

    Page(s): ii
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  • Institute sections

    Page(s): iii
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  • Geographical Location of Members Elected January 4, 1933

    Page(s): iv
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  • Applications for Membership

    Page(s): v
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1933

    Page(s): vi
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  • Charles William Horn, Director, 1933

    Page(s): 174
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  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 175 - 189
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  • Harry Shoemaker

    Page(s): 190 - 191
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  • The Required Mininum Frequency Separation between Carrier Waves of Broadcast Stations

    Page(s): 193 - 211
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    The general problem of interference between adjaceni broadcast channels is discussed in relation to the average distribution of power over the frequency range of typical broadcast signals, the response characteristics of the ear, and the frequency characteristics of transmitters and receivers. The discussion includes a consideration of what may be accomplished by modifying the characteristics of transmitters and receivers, and the extent to which the required modifications depend upon relative field intensity of desired and interfering signals. The conclusions suggest that some rather extensive changes in the frequency allocation of broadcast channels will be necessary in order to provide at least one clear channel capable of high quality program transmission to all receivers. View full abstract»

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  • Low Power Radio Transmitters for Broadcasting

    Page(s): 212 - 227
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    This paper discusses the place of low powered installations in the existing radio broadcast system, and the importance of apparatus for such stations meeting the present-day requirements pertaining to frequency stability, modulation capability, fidelity, and radio-frequency harmonics. The characteristics and more interesting features of a new line of transmitters covering the range of output from 100 to 1000 watts are described. The basic unit is a 100-watt transmitter employing grid-bias modulation which is novel in so far as American broadcast practice is concerned. Outputs of 250, 500, and 1000 watts are obtained through the use of a supplementary amplifier unit equipped with tubes of appropriate capacity. Radiation-cooled tubes are used throughout, and both units are self-contained, being operated direct from an alternating-current supply without the use of rotating machinery. Mechanically the units are novel in that the housings are of a cabinet form with doors which allow complete access from the front for adjustment and maintenance. View full abstract»

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  • Supervisory and Control Equipment for Audio-Frequency Amplifiers

    Page(s): 228 - 237
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    This paper is divided into two parts: In the first part a new type of level indicator is presented, and in the second a device for controlling the output signal of an amplifier is described. Part I: Two types of level indicators in use at the present time on audio-frequency amplifiers are the r-m-s voltmeter and the average voltmeter. Neither of these will tell the operator how near the signal is to the overload point of the amplifier. A new type peak voltmeter is described that makes continuous measurements of the highest peak values attained by the signal. Part II: An automatic control circuit is described which reduces the amplification of a special amplifier when the output voltage reaches a certain amount, thereby keeping the subsequent equipment from being overloaded. View full abstract»

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  • General Theory on the Propagation of Radio Waves in the Ionized Layer of the Upper Atmosphere

    Page(s): 238 - 262
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    1. Theories on the propagation of radio waves in the entire range of frequencies used in communications are treated together with discussions on the applicable limit of the theory of geometrical optics to wave propagation. 2. Definitions of the "low-frequency," "medium-frequency," "medium-high-frequency," and "high-frequency" waves are given from the theoretical points of view. 3. A new term, "step reflection," is introduced to explain the propagation of medium-frequency waves, and its characteristics are explained. 4. Attenuation of a wave traveling through the ionized layer is calculated for various kinds of wave paths and electronic distributions. 5. The "metallic reflection theory" is applied to the investigations of the low-frequency transmission and a number of low-frequency phenomena; especially the sunset and sunrise drop of field intensity and polarization errors (or night errors) in direction finding are explained by applying the present theory. 6. Propagation of medium-frequency waves is treated by using the "step reflection method." 7. Medium-high-frequency and high-frequency transmissions are treated by applying the theory of geometrical optics, giving reasons why waves of 100-meter band in daylight and those of 500-meter band during the night have bad transmission characteristics. Propagation characteristics of the waves in the entire range of frequencies used in radio communications are seen in Table I and Fig. 9. 8. Transmission characteristics of the waves of various frequencies during the magnetic storm are theoretically considered by comparing them with our experiences hitherto known. View full abstract»

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  • Some Long-Distance Transmission Phenomena of Low-Frequency Waves

    Page(s): 263 - 270
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    From the results of a series of twenty-four-hour receiving measurements conducted here for more than two and a half years, some interesting phenomena are picked out and discussed. The main points of the conclusions reached are: (1) the daylight signal strength of Kahuku is greater than the night signal strength; (2) several successive crevasses of about a two hours' period are observed regularly in the signal strengths of Bolinas and Kahuku during the partial daylight hours. View full abstract»

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  • A Practical Analysis of Parallel Resonance

    Page(s): 271 - 281
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    Vector diagrams are developed for various conditions of tuning parallel circuits, and from the geometry of the diagrams mathematical relations are derived. These relations are then plotted for use in tuning operations. Two examples are given of the practical application of the analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Relations between the Parameters of Coupled-Circuit Theory and Transducer Theory with Some Applications

    Page(s): 282 - 289
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    Relations between the impedance parameters usually used in coupled-circuit theory and those of transducer theory are derived. These indicate some useful methods of attacking certain problems-the determination of resonance conditions in a chain of coupled circuits, for example. View full abstract»

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  • Graphical Methods for Problems Involving Radio-Frequency Transmission Lines

    Page(s): 290 - 302
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    When designing arrangements embodying radio-frequency transmission lines it is in most cases permissible to neglect resistance and leakage conductance of the line. The analysis, therefore, becomes considerably simplified as compared with the exact treatment. Using the above assumption, in this paper graphical methods are given for the determination of currents, voltages, and impedances along a transmission line. A simplified elliptical diagram is developed for finding current or voltage distribution. The application of circle diagrams is explained, by means of which the line input impedance may be obtained under various conditions. View full abstract»

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  • Ellipse Diagram of a Lecher Wire System

    Page(s): 303 - 311
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    According to theoretical investigation, the current through the end of a Lecher wire system has been found to be inversely proportional to the length of a radius vector drawn from a point to the boundary of an ellipse. Such a diagram is called an "ellipse diagram" of the Lecher wire system, and is analogous to the so-called circle diagram for the induction motor. The nature of this diagram is explained in detail in this paper. By the aid of this diagram, the effect of the length of the wires on the form of the current through the end of Lecher wire system is investigated. View full abstract»

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  • Book reviews

    Page(s): 317
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  • Bookelts, catalogs, and pamphlets received

    Page(s): 318
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  • Radio abstracts and references

    Page(s): 319 - 325
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope