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Annals of the History of Computing, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date July-Sept. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
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  • From the Editor's Desk

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • MESM and the Beginning of the Computer Era in the Soviet Union

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 4 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (649 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The MESM - Malaya Elektronnaya Schetnaya Mashina (small electronic computing machine) - was the first computer built in the USSR. This history of early Soviet computers examines the technical characteristics of the machines and the background of Soviet computer development View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Computer Society Information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 17
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  • Strela-1, the First Soviet Computer: Political Success and Technological Failure

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 18 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (827 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Which computer was developed first in the Soviet Union? Which one was first successful? Such questions are difficult to answer, but recently declassified archival material may hold the key. The story of the Strela illustrates how competing interests helped determine the fate of this computer, a political success but a technological failure. This article examines the interests and behavior of two groups-the engineers and the scientists-involved in the initial developments of Soviet high-speed, digital computers, which had been obscured by ideology. What the author found was that a conflict of interests existed between the mechanical engineers and the mathematicians. The engineers were associated with the ministry producing the measurement and control instruments for the artillery, while the mathematicians were associated largely with the country's nuclear developments View full abstract»

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  • Informatics Acquisition by Sterling Software: Unsolicited Offer, Takeover Attempt, and Merger

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 32 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (85 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A series of events began in 1983 that eventually led to Sterling Software's 1985 acquisition of Informatics. The acquisition, unique at the time in the software industry, was preceded by an unsolicited offer and takeover attempt with a proxy fight. The transaction might well be called a "hostile takeover" although Informatics finally accepted the merger terms View full abstract»

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  • Pioneering Risk: Lessons from the US Teletext/Videotex Failure

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 41 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (130 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Digital teletext/videotex services enjoyed a decades-long heyday in Europe, and only recently have largely given way to the far more capable Internet. But neither service succeeded in the US. This article assesses multiple reasons behind the American failure to adopt this technology, some of which apply to today's digital services View full abstract»

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  • 'Rough Consensus and Running Code' and the Internet-OSI Standards War

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 48 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (197 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Internet historians recognize the technical achievements but often overlook the bureaucratic innovations of Internet pioneers. The phrase, "We reject: kings, presidents, and voting. We believe in: rough consensus and running code," was coined by David Clark in 1992. This article explains how the phrase captured the technical and political values of Internet engineers during a crucial phase in the Internet's growth View full abstract»

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  • Establishing Moore's Law

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 62 - 75
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (297 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The seemingly unshakeable accuracy of Moore's law - which states that the speed of computers; as measured by the number of transistors that can be placed on a single chip, will double every year or two - has been credited with being the engine of the electronics revolution, and is regarded as the premier example of a self-fulfilling prophecy and technological trajectory in both the academic and popular press. Although many factors have kept Moore's law as an industry benchmark, it is the entry of foreign competition that seems to have played a critical role in maintaining the pace of Moore's law in the early VLSI transition. Many different kinds of chips used many competing logic families. DRAMs and microprocessors became critical to the semiconductor industry, yet were unknown during the original formulation of Moore's law View full abstract»

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  • Anecdotes

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 76 - 80
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  • Reviews

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 81 - 83
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  • Local Area Networking

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 84 - 85
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  • Events and Sightings

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 86 - 88, 95
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  • Biographies

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 89 - 95
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  • The Materiality of the Internet

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Internet is a technological construction with a magnitude and scope comparable to the hydroelectric dams, railroads, aircraft, and electric power systems of an earlier era. Yet, it has no obvious physical manifestation--no physical object we can point to that obviously and unambiguously represents it. This article suggests some of the reasons why that is and whether a physical essence is important in defining large-scale technological systems. View full abstract»

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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

From the analytical engine to the supercomputer, from Pascal to von Neumann, from punched cards to CD-ROMs -- theIEEE Annals of the History of Computing covers the breadth of computer history.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Lars Heide
Copenhagen Business School
Centre for Business History