By Topic

Computers, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date April 1976

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • IEEE Transactions on Computers - Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (485 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Trends in Artificial Intelligence

    Page(s): 313 - 316
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2191 KB)  

    THIS Special Issue on Artificial Intelligence in the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTERS is composed of selected papers from the 3rd International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI), Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 1973. Far more high-quality papers have been presented at these conferences erences than can be accommodated in any one journal. However, the interdisciplinary nature of artificial intelligence (AI) means that IJCAI papers regularly appear in several journals. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Definition-Driven Theorem Prover

    Page(s): 317 - 322
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2179 KB)  

    This paper describes a theorem prover, running on a PDP-10-Tenex system, that can prove some theorems whose statements involve a relatively large number of definitions. Such theorems require special methods because 1) their statements contain a large number of clauses and 2) their proofs are quite long although straightforward. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Resolution-Based Proof Procedure Using Deletion-Directed Search

    Page(s): 323 - 327
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2041 KB)  

    The operation of a deletion-directed search strategy for resolution-based proof procedures is discussed. The strategy attempts to determine the satisfiability of a set of input clauses while at the same time minimizing the cardinality of the set of retained clauses. Distribution, a new clause deletion rule which is fundamental to the operation of the search strategy, is also described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Semantically Guided Deductive System for Automatic Theorem Proving

    Page(s): 328 - 334
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2267 KB)  

    A semantic and deductive formal system for automatic theorem proving is presented. The system has, as its deductive component, a form of natural deduction. Its semantic component relies on an underlying representation of a model. This model is invoked to prune subgoals generated by the deductive component, whenever such subgoals test false in the model. In addition, the model is used to suggest inferences to be made at the deductive level. Conversely, the current state of the proof suggests changes to be made to the model, e.g., when a construction is required as in geometry. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Hole in Goal Trees: Some Guidance from Resolution Theory

    Page(s): 335 - 341
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2602 KB)  

    The representation power of goal-subgoal trees and the adequacy of this form of problem reduction is considered. A number of inadequacies in the classical form are illustrated, and two versions of a syntactic procedure incorporating extensions are given. Although the form of the corrections are suggested from resolution theory results, and the value of this connection emphasized, the paper discusses the goal tree format and its extensions on an informal level. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Conversion of Predicate-Calculus Axioms to Corresponding Deterministic Programs

    Page(s): 342 - 346
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2312 KB)  

    The problem of converting axioms in predicate calculus to deterministic programs, which are to be used as "rules" by a general problem solver (GPS)-type supervisor is considered. It is shown that this can be done, but that the "objects" must then contain procedure closures or "FUNARG-expressions" which are later applied. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Model for Control Structures for Artificial Intelligence Programming Languages

    Page(s): 347 - 353
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1560 KB)  

    Newer programming languages for artificial intelligence extend the class of available control regimes beyond simple hierarchical control. In so doing, a key issue is using a model that clearly exhibits the relation between modules, processes, access environments, and control environments. This paper presents a model which is applicable to diverse languages and presents a set of control primitives which provide a concise basis on which one can define almost all known regimes of control. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Clisp: Conversational Lisp

    Page(s): 354 - 357
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2076 KB)  

    Clisp is an attempt to make Lisp programs easier to read and write by extending the syntax of Lisp to include infix operators, IF-THEN statements, FOR-DO-WHILE statements, and similar Algol-like constructs, without changing the structure or representation of the language. Clisp is implemented through Lisp's error handling machinery, rather than by modifying the interpreter. When an expression is encountered whose evaluation causes an error, the expression is scanned for possible Clisp constructs, which are then converted to the equivalent Lisp expressions. Thus, users can freely intermix Lisp and Clisp without ut having to distinguish which is which. Emphasis in the design and development of Clisp has been on the system aspects of such a facility, with the goal of producing a useful tool, not just another language. To this end, Clisp includes interactive error correction and many "do-what-I-mean" features. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Semantic Modeling for Deductive Question-Answering

    Page(s): 358 - 366
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2765 KB)  

    A description of techniques used for semantic modeling in a deductive question-answering system is given. The system maintains a dialog and is able to understand situations which can be expressed as a series of sequential time-frames. Specific relevant questions are asked by the system when it is unable to succeed in a given task. It can also provide reasons for its previous actions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • D-Script: A Computational Theory of Descriptions

    Page(s): 366 - 373
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3694 KB)  

    This paper describes D-Script, a language for representing knowledge in artificial intelligence (AI) programs. D-Script contains a powerful formalism for descriptions, which permits the representation of statements that are problematical for other systems. Particular attention is paid to problems of opaque contexts, time contexts, and knowledge about knowledge. The design of a deductive system for this language is also considered. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Some Frills for Modal Tic-Tac-Toe: Semantics of Predicate Complement Constructions

    Page(s): 374 - 389
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3492 KB)  

    Predicate complement constructions are a rich source of semantic problems. A system for testing the semantic properties (presuppositions and entailments) of predicate complement constructions has been constructed, and, in particular, the implementations of these constructions have been explored in some detail in the context of the tic-tac-toe game-playing setting of Isard and Longuet-Higgins [2] and Davies and Isard [1]. Even in such a limited setting, the implementations of many of these constructions (especially composite predicate complement constructions) are nontrivial, suggesting that such restricted settings provide a good testing ground for many key linguistic problems. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Architecture of Coherent Information System: A General Problem Solving System

    Page(s): 390 - 402
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3441 KB)  

    This paper discusses the architecture of a metasystem, which can be used to generate intelligent information systems for different domains of discourse. It points out the kinds of knowledge accepted by the system, and the way the knowledge is used to do nontrivial problem solving. The organization of the system makes it possible for it to function in the context of a large and expanding data base. The metasystem provides a basis for the definition of the concept of machine understanding in terms of the models that the machine can build in a domain, and the way it can use the models. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • PAS-II: An Interactive Task-Free Version of an Automatic Protocol Analysis System

    Page(s): 402 - 413
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4625 KB)  

    PAS-II, a computer program which represents a generalized version of an automatic protocol system (PAS-I) is described. PAS-II is a task-free, interactive, modular data analysis sis system for inferring the information processes used by a human from his verbal behavior while solving a problem. The output of the program is a problem behavior graph: a description of the subject's changing knowledge state during problem solving. As an example of system operation the PAS-II analysis of a short cryptarithmetic protocol is presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • System Organizations for Speech Understanding: Implications of Network and Multiprocessor Computer Architectures for AI

    Page(s): 414 - 421
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2870 KB)  

    This paper considers various factors affecting system em organization for speech understanding research. The structure of the Hearsay system based on a set of cooperating, independent processes using the hypothesize-and-test paradigm is presented. Design considerations for the effective use of multiprocessor and network achitectures in speech understanding systems ems are presented: control of processes, interprocess communication and data sharing, resource allocation, and debugging are discussed.1 View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Hearsay-I Speech Understanding System: An Example of the Recognition Process

    Page(s): 422 - 431
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1700 KB)  

    This paper describes the structure and operation of the Hearsay-I1speech understanding system by the use of a specific example illustrating the various stages of recognition. The system consists of a set of cooperating independent processes, each representing a source of knowledge. The knowledge is used either to predict what may appear in a given context or to verify hypotheses resulting from a prediction. The structure of the system is illustrated by considering its operation in a particular task situation: Voice-Chess. The representation and use of various sources of knowledge are outlined. Preliminary results of the reduction in search resulting from the use of various sources of knowledge are given. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Speech Understanding Through Syntactic and Semantic Analysis

    Page(s): 432 - 439
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3101 KB)  

    Stanford Research Institute (SRI) is participating in a major program of research on the analysis of continuous speech by computer. The goal is the development of a speech understanding system capable of engaging a human operator in a natural conversation about a specific problem domain. The approach being taken is distinctive in the extent to which it depends on syntactic and semantic processing to guide the acoustic analysis. This correspondence provides a description of the first version of the system, emphasizing the kinds of information that need to be added for effective results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computer Description of Curved Objects

    Page(s): 439 - 449
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5792 KB)  

    A ranging system, consisting of a laser, computer-controlled optical deflection assembly, and TV camera, obtains three-dimensional images of curved solid objects. The object is segmented into parts by grouping parallel traces obtained from the ranging system. Making use of the property of generalized translational invariance, the parts are described in terms of generalized cylinders, consisting of a space curve, or axis, and a circular cross section function on this axis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Finding Picture Edges Through Collinearity of Feature Points

    Page(s): 449 - 456
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (6552 KB)  

    The recovery of straight picture edges from digitizations of scenes containing polyhedra ("line finding") is central to the functioning of scene analysis programs. While recognizing that recovery properly involves a computational mobilization of a great deal of knowledge-supported context, there remain some basic issues of representation which govern the way in which the primary data—grey levels—are addressed. The paper describes a parametric representation of straight picture edges and its procedural deployment in the recovery of edges from digitizations of scenes whose contents are essentially polyhedra with strong visible shadows. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Computer Society Publications

    Page(s): 456
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (135 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Management Auditing of Computer Operations

    Page(s): 456
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (97 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Computers is a monthly publication with a wide distribution to researchers, developers, technical managers, and educators in the computer field.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Albert Y. Zomaya
School of Information Technologies
Building J12
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
http://www.cs.usyd.edu.au/~zomaya
albert.zomaya@sydney.edu.au