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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 1929

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Contents

    Page(s): 2089
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  • General Information

    Page(s): 2090
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  • Suggestions for Contributors to the Proceedings

    Page(s): 2091
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  • Institute sections

    Page(s): 2092
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  • George Washington Pierce - President of the Institute, 1918 and 1919

    Page(s): 2094
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  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 2095 - 2109
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  • Geographical Location of Members Elected November 6, 1929

    Page(s): 2110 - 2112
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  • Applications for Membership

    Page(s): 2113 - 2117
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  • Officers and Board of Direction, 1929

    Page(s): 2118 - 2119
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  • Typical Wireless Apparatus Used on British and European Airways

    Page(s): 2121 - 2136
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    The information given in this paper is based in the main on the system in operation on British airways. European airways follow to a greater or less degree the general principles underlying the system described. View full abstract»

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  • Radio for the Air Transport Operator

    Page(s): 2137 - 2140
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    This paper deals with the aid of radio to an air transport operator; first, with merely long-wave receiving equipment on the plane, and, secondly, with the additional use of a short-wave plane transmitter. The tendency is noted toward establishment of short-wave two-way communication systems by theoperators themselves, Requirements for apparatus under these conditions are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • The Civil Airways and Their Radio Facilities

    Page(s): 2141 - 2157
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    This paper describes the establishment of the radio facilities on the civil airways of the United States and their importance for air navigation. The legislation which created the Aeronautics Branch of the Department of Commerce and its organization is discussed. Description is given of the radiotelephone and radiotelegraph equipment used in the collection and broadcasting of weather information to aircraft. The transmitter used is rated at 2-kw output and is of the master-oscillator controlled type. A directive radio transmitting system using crossed coil antennas is employed to guide aircraft over the established airways. It is of such a type that the pilot receives one signal while within a narrow zone on the course, and other signals if off the course. This greatly facilitates flying under conditions of poor visibility. The regulations that have been proposed for the installation of radio equipment on aircraft are briefly given together with the more important frequencies allocated for aircraft work. The purpose and needs for these radio facilities and the way in which they have developed are also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Applying the Visual Double-Modulation Type Radio Range to the Airways

    Page(s): 2158 - 2184
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    This paper deals with methods for aligning the courses of the visual radio range with the fixed airways. It has previously been shown that the courses of the aural radio range may be shifted by the use of a vertical wire antenna in conjunction with the transmitting loop antennas or by varying the relative power in the two antennas. These methods are, in part, applicable to the visual system. In the aural system the goniometer primaries are excited alternately. This permits independent consideration of the field patterns due to the primaries. In the visual system this is not the case as both goniometer primaries are excited all the time. Two cases present themselves, the condition when the currents in the primaries are in time phase and the condition when they are in quadrature time phase. The former condition results in two beacon courses which are 180 deg. apart and cannot be shifted from this relationship. The latter condition yields four beacon courses. A mathematical analysis is made of this case and the amounts of angular variation possible using several methods of attack are tabulated. A method of obtaining small amounts of shift by an adjustment of the receiving equipment aboard the airplanes is also described; one of the reeds is shunted by a suitable resistance in order that the reeds will vibrate equally when on one side of the equisignal zone. View full abstract»

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  • Radio in Aeronautics - Its Technical Status and the Organization for Its Application in Germany

    Page(s): 2185 - 2229
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    The work gives a review of the present status of radio in aeronautics in Germany. Not only does it describe the apparatus used at the present time in German aircraft communications, but it also gives results of measurements on the fundamentals of radio in aeronautics, which have been made by the Deutschen Versuchsanstalt fiur Luftfahrt E. V. Further, it indicates the trend that German aircraft radio will probably follow in the next few years. It takes up the subjects of long-wave sets, sets for short- and ultra-short waves, navigation apparatus for aircraft using radio waves, and airship radio sets. Finally, the German organization for the application of radio in aeronautics is described. View full abstract»

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  • The Constants of Aircraft Trailing Antennas

    Page(s): 2230 - 2241
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    This paper constitutes a report on the results of the measurement of the trailing antenna constants on several types of aircraft including the dirigible Los Angeles. A brief description of the apparatus and method is given. Curves for a typical airplane and dirigible are presented and from these curves conclusions are drawn as to the center of radiation and the relation between antenna resistance and the center of radiation. The uniformilty of antenna constants of heavier-than-air craft is noted, also the negligible effect of structural differences, speed, and weight on antenna characteristics. View full abstract»

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  • On the Daylight Transmission Characteristics of Horizontally and Vertically Polarized Waves from Airplanes

    Page(s): 2242 - 2258
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    The investigation described below was carried out for the purpose of comparing the transmission characteristics from an airplane of horizontally and vertically polarized waves in daytime. A frequency of about 6 megacycles was arbitrarily chosen. In view of the fact that modern practice is tending towards the elimination of the trailing wire antenna, an antenna producing vertically polarized waves must of necessity be of small dimensions. The transmissions were therefore compared using a doublet antenna, each arm of which stretched from wing tip to tail for the horizontally polarized wave, and a rigid antenna six feet high for the vertically polarized wave. It was found that the sky ray began to be appreciable with the horizontally polarized wave at a distance of 20 miles, while on the vertically polarized wave it became important at a distance of 50 miles. The signal from the sky ray for distances of the order of 150 miles was always stronger with horizontal polarization than with vertical. The result with the direct ray was different. The signal from the vertically polarized wave was stronger than that from the horizontally polarized wave over highly conducting ground, while the reverse was the case over badly conducting ground. For this reason, the signal from the vertically polarized wave sometimes became very weak at a distance of 40 to 50 miles, before the sky ray was able to arrive with sufficient strength. This occurred particularly on badly conducting ground and when the airplane was flying low. View full abstract»

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  • Temperature Rating of Wind-Driven Aircraft Radio Generators

    Page(s): 2259 - 2267
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    Measurements of temperature rise of generator under load are given for still air and in flight. Theory of heat emission is briefy reviewed, constants of emissivity are given from which rising and final temperatures of generators can be approximated. Conditions governing the rating of wind-driven aircraft radio generators are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Applying the Radio Range to the Airways

    Page(s): 2268 - 2282
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    In pursuance of the program of radio aids to flight undertaken by the Department of Commerce, experimental and installation work has progressed in the application of the radio range (directive radiobeacon) along the airways. To date, only the aural type has been put into routine daily operation, and it is the only type of beacon considered in this paper, which discusses methods of adjusting the space pattern of the beacon system in order that the courses may align with the fixed airways. These beacons also need to be readily distinguished from one another, and so designed that a minimum of interference is met. By using a vertical wire antenna in addition to the loop antennas and varying the relative power in the two loop antennas it was found possible to secure practically any array of courses desired. The radio ranges at Hadley Field, N. J., and Bellefonte, Pa., were employed in the experimental work with excellent results. The field-intensity measurements made gave space patterns which checked very well with the theoretical patterns for such antenna systems. Careful spacing of the radio ranges within the frequency band, as well as distinctive coding of each beacon, solved the problem of interference. In selecting the proper coding for the beacons a study of the physiological effects of various sound groups was made, and the final coding chosen was such as to give a signal of equal time duration on each side of the course. View full abstract»

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  • Effect of Flight on Hearing

    Page(s): 2283 - 2296
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    The unusual conditions imposed by flight on the sense of hearing are stated, showing the need of audiometric study. After brief review of the theory of the audiometer, data are submitted covering: (a) fatigue as indicated by measurements before and after flight, (b) fatigue as vndicated by measurements taken during flight, (c) initial impairment coincident with flight, (d) group measurements of fliers and non-fliers as a test for permanent impairment. The results are discussed with particular view to their bearing on aircraft radio operation. View full abstract»

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  • Book reviews

    Page(s): 2297
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  • Books Received

    Page(s): 2298
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  • Booklets, bulletins, and catalogs received

    Page(s): 2298
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  • Monthly list of references to current radio literature

    Page(s): 2299 - 2302
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    This is a monthly list of references prepared by the Bureau of Standards and is intended to cover the more important papers of interest to professional radio engineers which have recently appeared in periodicals, books, etc. The number at the left of each reference classifies the reference by subject in accordance with the scheme presented in "A Decimal Classification of Radio Subjects - An Extension of the Dewey System," Bureau of Standards Circular No. 138, a copy of which may be obtained for ten cents from the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, USA. The articles listed below are not obtainable from the Government. The various periodicals can be secured from their publishers and can be consulted at large public libraries. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors to this issue

    Page(s): 2303 - 2304
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope