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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1929

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Institute of Radio Engineers - Forthcoming Meetings

    Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • General Information

    Page(s): 2
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  • Suggestions for Contributors to the Proceedings

    Page(s): 3
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  • Institute sections

    Page(s): 4
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  • Raymond A. Heising - Member Board of Direction, 1929

    Page(s): 6
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  • Institute news and radio notes

    Page(s): 7 - 15
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  • Geographical Location of Members Elected December 5, 1928

    Page(s): 16 - 17
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  • Applications for Membership

    Page(s): 18 - 19
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  • Officers and Board of Direction, 1928

    Page(s): 20 - 21
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  • A Direct Reading Radio-Frequency Meter

    Page(s): 23 - 34
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    The method used is the well known one of reading a radio frequency by measuring the beat note produced with a calibrated crystal oscillator. A new type of direct reading audio-frequency meter having a scale of 2.0 to 4.5 kc per second makes the device automatic. The meter scale divisions are 0.1 kc apart, and under reasonable conditions, the accuracy of the reading is of this order. View full abstract»

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  • On the Determination of the Optimum Radiation Angle for Horizontal Antennas

    Page(s): 35 - 41
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    A standard of (directional) radiation at 15 meters was constructed consisting of a vertical half-wave antenna placed one-half wave above the earth, suitably excited, placed in front of a reflector consisting of five reflector wires slightly more than one-half wave long on a parabolic surface of opening of one wavelength. This was found to give directional characteristics showing a broad maximum of field strength twice that of the simple antenna without reflector. A parabolic reflector and radiating system rotatable about a horizontal axis perpendicular to the line to the distant station were then constructed near Berlin. The antenna at the focal axis of the paraboloid was one wave long, one-quarter wavelength from the parabola apex; and the parabolic reflector was of one wavelength opening and consisted of 9 wires along the paraboloid each approximately a half-wave long. The entire system was rotated while reception audibility measurements were made at Buenos Aires, a 2-kw transmitter being employed. The horizontally aimed system was found most effective. This held for both 15 and 20 meters. Similar results were obtained for reception on directional antennas. The conclusion is drawn that horizontal short-wave radiation is most desirable. View full abstract»

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  • Magnetostriction Oscillators

    Page(s): 42 - 88
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    The present paper describes a newly discovered method of using magnetostriction to produce and control electrical and mechanical frequencies of oscillations in a range of frequencies extending from a few hundred cycles per second to more than three hundred thousand cycles per second. The method involves the interaction of the mechanical vibrations of a magnetostrictive rod and the electric oscillations of an electric circuit in such a way that the electric currents in the circuit stimulate the rod to longitudinal vibration by magnetostriction and the vibrations of the rod react by magnetostriction on the electric circuit to maintain constancy of frequency. The constancy of frequency obtained compares favorably with that obtained with the piezo-electric crystal oscillators. For ease of construction and operation the magnetostriction oscillator has a great advantage over the piezo-electric oscillator, particularly in that the construction and adjustment of the magnetostriction vibrators is so simple that large numbers of standards of frequencies all operable with the same electrical circuits may be had at small expense. The magnetostriction oscillators supply a particularly pressing need in the range of frequencies below twenty-five thousand cycles per second in which range crystal control is impractical on account of the expense of obtaining sufficiently large crystal vibrators. In the range between twenty-five thousand cycles per second and three hundred thousand cycles per second the magnetostriction oscillators and the crystal oscillators have a common field of usefulness. View full abstract»

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  • The Importance of Radiotelegraphy in Science

    Page(s): 89 - 114
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    First Page of the Article
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  • An Auxiliary frequency Control for R.F. Oscillators

    Page(s): 115 - 117
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    A method of varying the frequency of an oscillator in small known amounts is described. The control operates on the normally fixed element in the oscillating circuit. The vernier calibration is readily made and maintained. View full abstract»

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  • A Method of Treating Resistance Stabilized Radio-Frequency Amplifying Circuits

    Page(s): 118 - 126
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    An equation is developed showing the relation between the circuit constants and the critical resistance in a resistance stabilized amplifier having a tuned grid circuit and a pure inductance plate load. In the derivation of this equation it has been found necessary to assume the grid to filament capacity to be zero. Equations are given which may serve as a basis for approximation formulas which will take this capacity into account. The experimental results suggest a convenient method of measuring very small capacities, and demonstrate the possibility of controlling regeneration, in this type of circuit, by means of a small condenser between the grid and filament. View full abstract»

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  • The Piezo-Electric Crystal Oscillator

    Page(s): 127 - 142
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    The zero-angle quartz crystal, having electrodes in direct contact with its surface, is used to control the output of a typical oscillating crystal circuit. The crystal is first considered as a simple mechanical oscillator, and the required plate circuit adjustment for sustained vibrations of the crystal obtained by Miler's method on the basis of an assumed electrically equivalent crystal circuit. The electrical equivalent of the crystal is then considered as the grid circuit of an oscillating vacuum-tube circuit and the equations for the frequency and condition for oscillation derived. The effects of the tube and circuit upon the frequency of a crystal-controlled oscillator are then shown. View full abstract»

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  • Fading Curves and Weather Conditions

    Page(s): 143 - 148
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    Sunset fading curves from Station KDKA were made at Morgantown with a Shaw Recorder during April and May, 1927. The curves taken on fine days show more irregularity during the daylight hours than those taken on cloudy days. It was found that the signal strength from KDKA during the dark hours sometimes fell far below the daylight strength. A falling curve indicates clearing weather for the next day while a rising curve is followed by cloudy weather or rain. View full abstract»

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  • Detection Characteristics of Three-Element Vacuum Tubes

    Page(s): 149 - 158
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    The change of grid potential in a grid-leak grid-condenser detector can be determined by considering a fictitious "rectified voltage" acting in series with the grid resistance. This equivalent voltage is inversely proportional to the tube "voltage constant" v, which has the value v = 2 Rg/ (dRg/dEg), and can be readily measured by an a.c. resistance bridge. The rectifying action of different tubes can be compared on the basis of the respective voltage constants at grid resistances inversely proportional to the size of grid condenser. Tubes are then compared under conditions of equal detector distortion, and the change of grid potential is inversely proportional to the voltage constants. The voltage constant of ordinary vacuum tubes at first drops rapidly as the grid resistance is increased, but soon flattens out and becomes constant at grid resistances above 50,000 to 150,000 ohms. The highest audio frequency that can be satisfactorily reproduced with the detector adjusted to full sensitivity is inversely proportional to the grid resistance at the lower end of the flat part of the v-Rgcharacteristic. It was found that tubes of the same type had uniform detection characteristics, that age, use, plate voltages between 16 and 122, and filament voltage (above the minimum necessary to give electron saturation) had little or no effect on the rectifying ability of high vacuum tubes at a given grid resistance in the useful range of operation. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Page(s): 158 - 160
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  • Filtering Antennas and Filter-Valve Circuits

    Page(s): 161 - 173
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    Some methods of coupling together many circuits or antennas giving them simultaneous excitation from the same source of energy are described. The purpose of such arrangements is the construction of practical filter circuits (filtering antennas) giving square-topped resonance curves with good efficiency. Some interesting phenomena with coupled antennas are described. View full abstract»

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  • Book review

    Page(s): 187
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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope