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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date July-Aug. 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Essay - Format wars and complexity

    Page(s): 4 - Shane Greenstein
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Editorial

    Page(s): 3 - 10
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  • IEEE Potentials

    Page(s): 0_1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Duke University [advertisement]

    Page(s): 0_2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Headquarters staff

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Engineering your electrical engineering education

    Page(s): 6 - Evan Ruzanski
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (869 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electrical and computer engineering (ECE) courses are usually structured in such a way to provide the student with the basics to solve problems in the field and then challenge the student with increasingly more difficult problems to effectively stretch those basic problem-solving approaches into more advanced techniques. While most of this problem-solving focus is placed on the technical arena, this is only one part of the educational experience for an ECE student. There are many nontechnical facets to one problem-solving repertoire that require development to become a successful practicing engineer in industry or academia after graduation. This article serves to provide some of these facets in a career-direction informational guide to junior- and senior-level undergraduate students and graduate students early in their ECE career. It also serves as a guide to outline some useful strategies not found in an engineering text to maximize one's educational experience at the undergraduate and graduate levels as well as the transition between them View full abstract»

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  • Obtaining that elusive Ph.D. - in every sense a marriage

    Page(s): 11 - 13
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    This paper describes the author's perceptions on obtaining Ph.D. degree which is compared with marriage. One should seriously consider the quest for a Ph.D. as a marriage between student and topic and treat the topic with all the respect and passion that one would treat his or her living spouse. Three ways to get through those tough times have been given. A visual aid has been presented that shows how a typical Ph. D. student's happiness varies. Communication and presentation skills have been elevated above technical ability in a formula that relates these skills to the ability to succeed. The Ph.D. is demanding and time consuming. It requires independent thinking skills and dedication, many sacrifices, vision and trust, and of course, a little luck and also think the Ph.D. as an investment View full abstract»

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  • Ethics for engineers falls in an unstructured gray zone

    Page(s): 14 - 16
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    As engineering is a profession, engineers must consider the impact of ethics in their behavior. The design and application of technology include the responsibility to provide quality products and services. Professional engineering includes the responsibility of creating a positive impact on society and the quality of life. The trust places a greater responsibility on the engineering profession to assure personal safety and national security. This underscores the need for engineers to understand ethical behavior and to establish ethical conduct as a foundation of their career. In fact, engineering ethics is as important to good engineering practices as mathematics, physics, design skills, and other engineering fundamentals. Thus many Professional engineering organizations such as the IEEE have developed codes of ethics as a guide for their members View full abstract»

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  • Volunteer work lands new engineer in the career of a lifetime

    Page(s): 17 - 18
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    This article is a collection of tips and an overview of the process through which the graduate engineer should practice to fit in the career of the lifetime. The engineer must keep contacts with the advisor, while doing their educational courses and also with potential employers. Graduate engineers are well trained in their fields in some organizations by the technical groups. Thus many companies will see the engineers, that they are teachable, whether they will communicate and work in a team and also valuable to their company. Thus the graduate engineer, who achieves these features, may run their career very smoothly View full abstract»

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  • Behavioral software agents for real-time games

    Page(s): 19 - 25
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    This paper describes the real time autonomous software agents include intensive simulations such as interactive computer entertainment software. The layered artificial intelligence (AI) architecture presented is based on the subsumption architecture, a proven control system for mobile robots that consists of parallel levels of independent behaviors. Higher-level behaviors modules can subsume lower-level ones through the limited number of inputs and outputs. This AI system can be highly optimized and extended various ways. A C++ program is presented demonstrating simple three-layer AI agents. Experiments with this program show that relatively little memory and processor time required per agent; furthermore, a modern computer game would be able to support thousands of simultaneous agents with this behavior system View full abstract»

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  • Three zone segregation of proteins-a comparison of structures

    Page(s): 26 - 30
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    In our work, we have made two groups of protein structure. One group is for mesophilic proteins, the other is for thermophilic proteins. For each protein under consideration we have collected three to five PDB structures of the same proteins from different organisms. This pdb is called CSR pdb file. For each protein we have one CSR pdb for thermophilic and one for mesophilic. We then structurally aligned the two CSR tiles by the help SPDBV for the comparative study and measuring the RMSD deviation for various aligning regions. Thus from the experimental results and discussion, the low value of RMSD deviation suggests that the particular region of the thermophilic and mesophilic proteins are in good correspondence structural alignment of the proteins View full abstract»

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  • Engineering strained silicon-looking back and into the future

    Page(s): 31 - 34
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    The purpose of this article is to explain the basics behind straining and report on the current process technologies available to strain CMOS devices. Strained Si enhances the performance of CMOS devices by increasing carrier mobility without having to make them smaller. As the benefits to be gained from scaling transistors continue to decrease, the commercial interest in using strained Si for CMOS devices has spiked. Additionally, strained Si still retains its integratability in CMOS manufacturing processes, unlike any other semiconductor material. Thus the real test for engineers lies in the ability to cost-effectively develop and apply strained Si technology into current CMOS process. Thus new methods for straining Si is integrated into IC manufacturing as industry interest in this technology continues to grow and also increases the speed, performance and functions of the circuits View full abstract»

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  • Use of low-cost patch antennas in modern wireless technology

    Page(s): 35 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1071 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, an overview of a special type of antenna called patch antennas is presented. Patch antennas are used in several wireless applications like global positioning system (GPS) receivers and radar systems. A patch antenna is constructed by having a conductive patch on a dielectric substrate above a conductive ground plane. A patch antenna can be constructed and integrated on a PCB or within a chip along with other circuit components. The excitation of the patch is via a feed line. This feed will supply the patch with the electrical signal to be converted to an electromagnetic wave. Several feed types exist based on the patch type and application. This article gives an overview of the construction of this type of antenna, its major characteristics, and design parameters along with the technologies in which it is being used View full abstract»

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  • A review of vector quantization techniques

    Page(s): 39 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (666 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The fundamental principles of quantization and the two basic types of quantization techniques-scalar and vector-have been introduced. The concept of VQ, its salient features, design of code book, and advantages/disadvantages has been dealt with in detail. VQ is a data compression technique, producing a reconstruction with as small a distortion as possible. The quality of the reconstruction depends on the amount of data that is discarded. The performance of different classes of VQ techniques like structured and unstructured VQ, memory and memoryless VQ, the types of VQ under each of these categories have been discussed. This article has surveyed these to a certain extent, and much more remains if a detailed analysis is required View full abstract»

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  • Gamesman problems

    Page(s): 48
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  • 2006 Student Activities Committee e-mail addresses

    Page(s): 49
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  • IEEE Enterprise [advertisement]

    Page(s): 50
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org