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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6 • Date June 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Design synthesis from interaction and state-based specifications

    Page(s): 349 - 364
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2619 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interaction-based and state-based modeling are two complementary approaches of behavior modeling. The former focuses on global interactions between system components. The latter concentrates on the internal states of individual components. Both approaches have been proven useful in practice. One challenging and important research objective is to combine the modeling power of both effectively and then use the combination as the basis for automatic design synthesis. We present a combination of interaction-based and state-based modeling, namely, live sequence charts and Z, for system specification. We then propose a way of generating distributed design from the combinations. Our approach handles systems with intensive interactive behaviors as well as complex state structures View full abstract»

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  • The impact of UML documentation on software maintenance: an experimental evaluation

    Page(s): 365 - 381
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3667 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is becoming the de facto standard for software analysis and design modeling. However, there is still significant resistance to model-driven development in many software organizations because it is perceived to be expensive and not necessarily cost-effective. Hence, it is important to investigate the benefits obtained from modeling. As a first step in this direction, this paper reports on controlled experiments, spanning two locations, that investigate the impact of UML documentation on software maintenance. Results show that, for complex tasks and past a certain learning curve, the availability of UML documentation may result in significant improvements in the functional correctness of changes as well as the quality of their design. However, there does not seem to be any saving of time. For simpler tasks, the time needed to update the UML documentation may be substantial compared with the potential benefits, thus motivating the need for UML tools with better support for software maintenance View full abstract»

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  • Reachability testing of concurrent programs

    Page(s): 382 - 403
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2851 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One approach to testing concurrent programs, called reachability testing, generates synchronization sequences automatically and on-the-fly, without constructing any static models. In this paper, we present a general execution model for concurrent programs that allows reachability testing to be applied to several commonly used synchronization constructs. We also present a new method for performing reachability testing. This new method guarantees that every partially ordered synchronization sequence will be exercised exactly once without having to save any sequences that have already been exercised. We describe a prototype reachability testing tool called RichTest and report some empirical results, including a comparison between RichTest and a partial order reduction-based tool called VeriSoft. RichTest performed significantly better for the programs in our study View full abstract»

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  • Using SCL to specify and check design intent in source code

    Page(s): 404 - 423
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3170 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software developers often fail to respect the intentions of designers due to missing or ignored documentation of design intent. SCL (Structural Constraint Language) addresses this problem by enabling designers to formalize and confirm compliance with design intent. The designer expresses his intent as constraints on the program model using the SCL language. The SCL conformance checking tool examines developer code to confirm that the code honors these constraints. This paper presents the design of the SCL language and its checker, a set of practical examples of applying SCL, and our experience with using it both in an industrial setting and on open-source software View full abstract»

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  • Comments on "An Interval Logic for Real-Time System Specification"

    Page(s): 424 - 427
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (545 KB)  

    The paper "An Interval Logic for Real-Time System Specification" (Mattolini and Nesi, IEEE Trans. Software Eng., vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 208-227, Mar. 2001) presents the TILCO specification language and compares it to other existing similar languages. In this comment, we show that several of the logic formulas used for the comparison are flawed and/or overly complicated and we explain why, in this respect, the comparison is moot View full abstract»

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  • Reply to comments on "An Interval Logic for Real-Time System Specification"

    Page(s): 428 - 431
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (730 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The paper on Comments on "An Interval Logic for Real-Time System Specification" presents some remarks on the comparison examples from TILCO and other logics and some slips on the related examples. This paper gives evidence that such issues have no impact on the validity of the TILCO theory of paper and provides some further clarifications about some aspects of the comparison View full abstract»

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  • The IEEE Computer Society celebrates two 60-Year Anniversaries

    Page(s): 432
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  • TSE Information for authors

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org