By Topic

Computer

Issue 6 • Date June 1975

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 42
  • Computer

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (947 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Everybody Wins... in the Great IEEE Computer Society Membership Race

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1319 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1320 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the President

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1779 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Does Easier Mean Better? [advertisement]

    Page(s): 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1342 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Calendar

    Page(s): 5 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1903 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): 8 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (534 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Update: information for the computer systems design professional

    Page(s): 9 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (15770 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Highlights of the 1974 Lake Arrowhead Workshop

    Page(s): 20 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (3339 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Session I Structured Programming: Concepts and Definitions

    Page(s): 23 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (3084 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Structured Programming: a Review of Some Practical Concepts

    Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1154 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Fortran Can it be Structured-Should it be?

    Page(s): 30 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2731 KB)  

    There is no doubt about it, structured programming (SP) is making waves. Wherever one goes within the computing community people are asking what it is and how they can use it. And the answers they are receiving are sometimes very different. This inability to pin down a precise definition has caused the original concept of SP to become widely distorted. For example, a recent advertisement described SP as "a means of improving the quality of the code, improving project control, reducing the debugging phase of the project, forcing good software documentation as an integral part of the system design, and making programs less sensitive to turnover of project personnel."<R>1</R> Thus portrayed as a panacea for the entire programming process, it is not surprising that in a recent week-long seminar given by Dr. Dijkstra, he refused to use the term at all. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Session II Structured Programming: A Quantitative Assessment

    Page(s): 38 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1970 KB)  

    It has now been about four years since the first impressive experience using structured programming* techniques on a large production software project.<R>1</R> Yet one still hears wildly varying claims about its effectiveness in general. Here are some recent samples. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Stuctured Programming at McAuto

    Page(s): 41 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (801 KB)  

    The history of structured programming at McDonnell Douglas Automation could be divided into two ages or eras: BC and AD. BC represents Before Clarity and AD represents After Discernment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applying Structured Programming to Command, Control, and Communication Software Development

    Page(s): 43 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1089 KB)  

    Much has been written describing structured programming (SP) technologies, but little has been written concerning measurable results from using those technologies to deliver programs within cost, time, and performance constraints. SP technologies have been applied to large-scale real-time program development, analyzed, and further developed at Hughes since 1971. As new software projects are started, the respective managers must state which of the technologies will and will not be used. The use of the applied techniques is then monitored to determine benefits and problems and to define useful modifications to the technologies. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Implementation of Structured Code Techniques on a Real-Time System

    Page(s): 48 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (721 KB)  

    In early 1973 the Computer Programming Laboratory of Hughes Aircraft Company decided to utilize structured programmning on a medium-sized (12 programmers) real-time system. The system, which was coded in CMS-2Y (MOD 8), ran on the UNIVAC AN/UYK-7 and had extensive hardware and interactive operator interfaces. In addition to the use of structured coding techniques, the software was developed using the "team concept" described below. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Measuring Programming Improvement at IBM-FSD

    Page(s): 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (411 KB)  

    The introduction of structured programming into FSD operations and the apparent resulting improvements in the programming process stimulated efforts to measure actual improvement. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experienced and Accomplishments with Structured Programming

    Page(s): 50 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (991 KB)  

    The two projects described here were developed at aine, Farber & Gordon, Inc. using structured programming, although neither project represents a first attempt on our part at using these techniques. (We began using SP techniques in 1970.) View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Concluding Remarks

    Page(s): 53 - 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1891 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Session III Structured Programming: Problems, Approaches, and Techniques

    Page(s): 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1564 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Structured Programming: Agony and/or Ecstacy

    Page(s): 56 - 57
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (736 KB)  

    It has been observed, and perhaps with good reason, that structured programming is a big pain in the neck. And yet, those who profess to have tried it also claim they like it. Furthermore, they insist they will never do without it again. Is it possible that the nay-sayers and the professed believers are talking about the same thing? Probably not. There is at least a subtle distinction which lies somewhere near the heart of the continuing structured programming controversy. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experience with Module-Level Specification Methods

    Page(s): 58 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2351 KB)  

    During the past three years, SofTech has been developing design and specification methods with the goals of improving design quality, reducing integration problems, increasing software portability, and enhancing project control and estimating methods. In particular we wanted to increase the visibility of the detailed design process in order to facilitate design reviews and design iterations. We also hoped to improve the description and management of all module interfaces in order to reduce integration problems and to allow alternative implementations of a module to be "plug-to-plug" compatible–an important consideration when software systems requiring several man-years to build are designed to be portable. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Session IV Impact of Structured Programming on Evolving Technologies and Related Programming Disciplines

    Page(s): 62
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1636 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Need for Improved Programming Language

    Page(s): 63 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (659 KB)  

    I adopt the point of view that an ideal language contains features well-matched to the abstract concepts which the problem-solving programmer uses in his own thinking. I also assume that the modifiability of programs is of paramount importance. The features below are not necessarily listed in order of importance; an ideal general-purpose programming language should probably have all of them because each one encourages a more systematic structured writing of programs. Most of these features are contained in some form in at least one implemented language, but unfortunately the best known and most used languages contain few of them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Structuring Engine: A Transition Tool

    Page(s): 64 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (419 KB)  

    In this workshop, the restructuring problem has been alluded to several times. Manual restructuring–i.e., the complete rewrite of a project using top-down design and implementation methods–has been offered as a way of improving existing software. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington