Computer

Issue 5 • May 1977

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 25
  • Computer

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): c1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1340 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): 1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1030 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Minis and Micros presents The First Annual Workshop on Dedicated Microprocessors in Military and Industrial Systems

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):2 - 3
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1800 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the President

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): 4
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1440 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Update: information for the computer systems design professional

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):6 - 103
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (2116 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Report: Towards a National Telecommunications Policy

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):7 - 107
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (3568 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Letters to the Editor

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): 10
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (322 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • FTCS-7

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):12 - 13
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1455 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Stack Computers [Guest editor's introduction]

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):14 - 16
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (3247 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Stack Computers: An Introduction

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):18 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (6192 KB)

    Basic idea. The stack, or last-in first-out store, has become more familiar recently because many microprocessors have incorporated a stack in some form. In some microprocessors, the stack can only contain return addresses for subroutines; in others there are provisions for holding temporary data in the stack. The stack derives its name from the idea that items are placed on the "top," thus "pushi... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Exploring a Stack Architecture

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):30 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (4132 KB)

    Computer architects design a high-performance system out of the same components that the rest of us would use to build a common one. They do it through an understanding of how the system will actually be programmed. Such was the insight which led to the development of stack-based computers. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Workshop on the New Computer Science and Engineering Model Curricula and tutoral on Microprocessor Laboratories

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):40 - 41
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (280 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Semantic Structures for Efficient Code Generation on a Stack Machine

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):42 - 48
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (6272 KB)

    Since the expression is the fundamental building block of any programming language, its evaluation is an integral part of program compilation and execution. In particular, the evaluation techniques and data structures are determined by the class of expressions acceptable by the language. This paper serves as a framework for expression evaluation on a stack machine by presenting a set of optimized ... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Stack Machine Development Australia, Great Britain, and Europe

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):50 - 52
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (3360 KB)

    In Europe, the computer in which the stack principle was most highly developed was the English Electric KDF9 (first delivered in 1963). This machine had two hardware stacks–onr for return addresses, the other a work stack with arithmetic and logic facilities. Regrettably, the experience gained on this machine was never embodied in a successor. It is worthwhile to look at the origins of its d... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Microsystems the Microprocessor in the Biological Laboratory

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):56 - 67
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (5509 KB)

    The use of microprocessors in the biological laboratory is a logical result of the evolution of computer use in the biomedical sciences. In 1963, H. K. Hartline and Floyd Ratliff, working at Rockefeller University in New York City, hooked up a CDC 160A computer as a generalpurpose laboratory instrument for data acquisition during their experiments on vision.1For stimulus control, they u... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Special Feature: Memory Extension Techniques for Minicomputers

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):68 - 75
    Cited by:  Patents (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (2840 KB)

    There are many computer users these days who have bumped up against the end of their memories. Years ago, IBM 1800, 1130, and 7094 users discovered that 32K words of addressable memory simply was not enough. Today, minicomputer users are discovering the same thing. And so are minicomputer manufacturers. Some of the newest mini's can address 128K, 256K, 512K, or even 1024K (1M) bytes of main memory... View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Open Channel

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):76 - 78
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (739 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New Products

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):80 - 85
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (9624 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New Literature

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): 85
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1616 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Recent IC Announcemtents

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): 89
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (93 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • New Applications

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):90 - 91
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (1826 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Calendar

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):98 - 101
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (841 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for Papers

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s): 99
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (296 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • National Computer Conference

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):104 - 105
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (510 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Book Reviews

    Publication Year: 1977, Page(s):109 - 110
    Request permission for commercial reuse | |PDF file iconPDF (528 KB)
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes peer-reviewed articles written for and by computer researchers and practitioners representing the full spectrum of computing and information technology, from hardware to software and from emerging research to new applications. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sumi Helal
Lancaster University
sumi.helal@computer.org