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Computer

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 1977

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 39
  • Computer

    Page(s): c1
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  • Computer/Communication Seminars of Excellence [advertisement]

    Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

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  • The Computer for the Professional [advertisement]

    Page(s): 2
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  • Special Message - IEEE Fellow Nominations

    Page(s): 3
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  • IEEE Computer Society

    Page(s): 4
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  • Update: information for the computer systems design professional

    Page(s): 5 - 101
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  • C-1000 the First TV Camera Designed for Computer Interface [advertisement]

    Page(s): 7
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  • Machine-Independent Simscript II.5 [advertisement]

    Page(s): 9
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  • Computer Networks [Guest editor's introduction]

    Page(s): 10 - 11
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  • A Review of Classification Schemes for Computer Communication Networks

    Page(s): 12 - 21
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    Classification of computer communication networks often depends upon the point of view and background of the person doing the classifying. Network designers, for example, tend to categorize the network according to its switching functioc–rcuit switching, message switch-or packet switching. Managers, who are occupied with economic considerations, look at the topological aspects of a network as centralized, decentralized, or distributed. Finally, network operators are interested in the use of deterministic, stochastic, or flow control routing algorithms, which are methods of routing the message or other communication entity across the network. View full abstract»

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  • Alternatives for Data Network Architectures

    Page(s): 22 - 29
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    The increasing use of computer data communications over the past several years has spawned a variety of network architectures to support requirements for distributed processing. Developed by various R&D groups,1-3by the common carriers,4-4by minicomputer and mainframe manufacturers,7,8and by the vendors of traditional communications hardware,9,10these new architectures represent alternative means to similar ends. This article provides a framework for understanding existing and forthcoming systems, focusing particular attention on the impact of evolving requirements and technologies. View full abstract»

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  • Compu/Time CT 100 [advertisement]

    Page(s): 30
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  • Microcomputer [advertisement]

    Page(s): 31
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  • Statistical Methods for Comparing Computer Services

    Page(s): 32 - 39
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    The advent of remote terminal access to computer systems, especially as provided by computer networks, has created a marketplace in which computer services rather than computer systems are being sold. And along with that marketplace has come the need for a way to compare and evaluate computer services. This paper presents a methodology for designing and analyzing computer service comparison experiments with the objective of selecting the best system. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Networking Symposium

    Page(s): 40 - 41
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  • A Survey of Methods for Improving Computer Network Reliability and Availability

    Page(s): 42 - 50
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    As computer networks are increasingly put into use, the organizations they serve are becoming increasingly concerned about data and network reliability and availability. Until recently, little emphasis was placed on making computer software reliable (except in military and communications applications), and little consideration was given to enhancing computer network reliability and availability. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering-Software Professionals [employment opportunities]

    Page(s): 51
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  • Labolink: An Optically Linked Laboratory Computer Network

    Page(s): 52 - 59
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    Kyoto University has developed a laboratory computer network that demonstrates an easy yet versatile way of accessing several kinds of computers from a single, small-scale computer. Known as "Labolink,"1,2the network is designed to support laboratory research and education. Unlike the RIG System, another university network reported on recently,3Labolink required no modification of the existing operating system. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic Modeling and Control of Digital Communication Networks

    Page(s): 60 - 64
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    Communication networks for digital data transmission can be classified as either circuit switched, message switched, or packet switched. In circuit-switched networks, a direct communication link is established between two users by closing a sequence of switches at appropriate network node points. The message is then transmitted continuously as is done, for example, in the national telephone network. In a message-switched network, the complete message is routed from node to node in the network until it reaches its destination. At each node, the message is placed in a queue to await next-node routing decisions and retransmission to a neighboring mode. Because of this two-step process, message-switched networks are known as store-and- forward networks. The packet-switched network is also a member of the store-and-forward class and differs from the message-switched network in that each message is subdivided into basic units called packets before being offered as input to the network. View full abstract»

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  • The Future in Teleconununications is at Bell Labs [advertisement]

    Page(s): 65
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  • Special Feature Distributed Computing Power: a Key to Productivity*

    Page(s): 66 - 74
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    Productivity is the driving force of the economic growth that leads to improved living standards. However, if the United States continues the past pattern of 2% productivity growth per year, the gross national product per capita will grow at only 2.5% per year and unemployment will still be at 5.7% in 1990. On the other hand, a single percentage point increase in productivity–from 2% to 3%–could accelerate economic growth sufficiently to drive unemployment down to 3.4% by 1990; two percentage points could drive it down to 1%, if other factors do not intrude. View full abstract»

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  • Tackle the Tough Ones! [advertisement]

    Page(s): 75
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  • New Products

    Page(s): 76 - 79
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  • Special Feature Auerbach Product Survey on Computer Network Hardware

    Page(s): 80 - 83
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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington