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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 5 • Date Oct. 1917

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information about the Society

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 321 - 322
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 323
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  • Officers and Board of Direction, 1917

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 324 - 326
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  • Note on "The Measurement of Radiotelegraphic Signals with the Oscillating Audion"

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 327 - 329
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    First Page of the Article
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  • The Effect of Commercial Conditions on Spark Transmitter Construction

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 331 - 347
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    Six types of commercial sets are considered: 1. A 2 k.w., Quenched or Rotary Synchronous Spark, Ship Set; 2. A 0.5 k.w., Quenched or Rotary Synchronous Spark, Ship Set; 3. A 0.25 k.w., Rotary Non-Synchronous Spark, Cargo Ship Set; 4. A 3 k.w., Rotary Non-Synchronous Spark, Land Station Set; 5. A 2 k.w., Quenched Spark, Gasoline engine driven, Land Set; 6. A 10 k.w., Quenched Spark Land Set for Juneau, Alaska. Photographs and descriptions of these are given, with special reference to nature of traffic, power source, space limitations, and expense. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 348 - 352
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  • An Automatic Transmitter for Distress Signals

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 353 - 356
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    A rotating disc is arranged to carry curved blocks on its periphery. Each block permits transmitting a certain sign. Simple distress messages can thus be sent by unskilled persons. View full abstract»

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  • Harmonic Method of Calibrating a Wave Meter

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 357 - 360
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    The output of an electron relay oscillator is passed thru a non-resonant, rectifying circuit. The rectified radio frequency is rich in upper harmonics. These are used to calibrate a wave meter after a limited range thereof has been calibrated by another and absolute method. Details of the requisite procedure are given. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 361 - 362
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  • The Coupled Circuit by the Method of Generalized Angular Velocities

    Publication Year: 1917 , Page(s): 363 - 382
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    The generalized impedance z of an oscillating circuit may be formed from the generalized angular velocity of oscillation, n, by analogy with the alternating-current circuit. Equating this generalized impedance to zero, and solving for n, gives the free generalized angular velocities of oscillation. The real and imaginary portions of these free generalized angular velocities are used to find respectively the damping factors and frequencies of oscillation of the circuit. From z may be found the threshold impedance of the circuit n(dz/dn). Dividing the initial voltage of the circuit by this threshold impedance gives the initial amplitudes of current oscillation. The use of these two rules determines the complete expression for the oscillating current in any oscillating-current network. The method applies to the simple inductively coupled circuit. A complete exact solution for the case of primary condenser discharge may be readily obtained. The method is of particular service in numerical problems. An approximate method of solving the biquadratic obtained when coupled circuits are considered is given in an appendix to the paper. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

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