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Radio Engineers, Proceedings of the Institute of

Issue 3 • Date June 1916

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information about the Society

    Page(s): 211 - 212
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents

    Page(s): 213
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  • Officers and Board of Direction, 1916

    Page(s): 214 - 216
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the Sections of the Institute of Radio Engineers

    Page(s): 217 - 219
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Radio in Alaska

    Page(s): 221 - 231
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    The chain of semi-high-power stations (25 K.W.) established by the Marconi Company at Ketchikan, Juneau, and Astoria in Alaska are described. The masts, insulation, antenna, power supply, rotary converter, discharger, and relay key of these stations are considered in detail. The climatic and radio stray conditions are shown to be unusual. Remarkable directive absorption is encountered. The favorable receiving conditions are illustrated. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Page(s): 232
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  • An Impulse Excitation Transmitter

    Page(s): 233 - 247
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    Ideal "impulse excitation," as opposed to the usual quenching gap phenomena, is described. The best conditions for impulse excitation are explained. The development of a rotary sectored gap of small separation operating in a hydrocarbon atmosphere is considered. A 2,500 volt, 60 cycle transformer charges a large capacity which discharges thru the gap and a small inductance. Effective impulse excitation requires about 2,400 R.P.M. of the gap or more. Using alcohol vapor, an adjustable pressure, (safety) valve must be fitted to the gap to prevent excessive pressures which raise the gap voltage inordinately. A complete 2 kilowatt transmitter of this type is described. The antenna circuit need not be in tune with the closed circuit; hence wave changing is accomplished by merely shifting the antenna lead along the antenna loading inductance. The radiation remains constant over a wide range of wave lengths without closed circuit tuning. Smooth-disc gap experiments are also described. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Page(s): 248 - 250
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  • Experiments at the U. S. Naval Radio Station Darien, Canal Zone

    Page(s): 251 - 258
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    The results of measurements of the strength of received signals at Darien from a number of stations are given. A specially modified ultraudion circuit is used. The Austin-Cohen formula is found to give much closer agreement with the observations than the Sommerfeld formula. Relations between received current and audibility are given for the audion and ultraudion. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Page(s): 259 - 269
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  • The Mechanism of Radiation and Propagation in Radio Communication

    Page(s): 271 - 280
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    The intensity of the electric field at a distance from a statically charged antenna is calculated from elementary considerations. The same quantity is derived for the case in which the charge is oscillating at a radio frequency. It is shown that the total charges acting on the receiver in the two cases have a ratio equal to the square of the ratio of the transmitting distance to a certain part of the wave length; and hence the great advantage of the radio frequency transmission. The theories of Edison, Tesla and Sommerfeld are historically considered. It is shown that there is no physical justification for the separation of the wave into surface and space waves. The electric and magnetic intensities at various distances from the antenna are calculated, and it is shown that they become practically equal at a wave length away. The author prefers to regard radio transmission as due to conducted radio frequency earth currents rather than modified Hertzian oscillator waves. The three distinct portions of the atmosphere: the troposphere, the stratosphere, and the coronium layer, are described, and their effect on radio transmission considered. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Page(s): 281
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  • Amplitude Relations in Coupled Circuits

    Page(s): 283 - 300
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    An historical survey of previous work on coupled circuits is made. There are formed, in general, in coupled circuits two waves in both primary and secondary circuits. The amplitude ratios of the longer two of these waves and of the shorter two of these waves are calculated. Neglecting resistance, the shorter waves are opposite in phase, the longer waves in phase. A simple experimental method for rapidly verifying the theoretical relations is described. The ratios of the amplitude of the longer to the shorter primary wave and of the longer to the shorter secondary wave are theoretically determined for both condenser excitation and inductance excitation. It is shown that at resonance the magnetic fluxes of corresponding long or corresponding short waves are equal numerically. It also appears that maximum secondary effect is not obtained for equal natural periods of the circuits. The extent to which wave meter close coupling affects accuracy of wave length determination is considered. An explanation of dissymmetry of resonance curves about the resonance point is also given. All relations deduced are graphically illustrated. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion

    Page(s): 301 - 304
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  • Sustained Wave Receiving Data

    Page(s): 305 - 306
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    The shipboard reception by daylight of sustained wave signals from a 30 kilowatt arc at distances of the order of 4,000 miles (7,000 km.) and from a 60 kilowatt arc at distances of approximately 7,000 miles (11,000 km.) in the evening are instanced. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased production in 1938. The current retitled publication is Proceedings of the IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope