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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 5 • Date May 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s): c2
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  • EgoSpaces: facilitating rapid development of context-aware mobile applications

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s):281 - 298
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4427 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Today's mobile applications require constant adaptation to their changing environments, or contexts. Technological advances have increased the pervasiveness of mobile computing devices such as laptops, handhelds, and embedded sensors. The sheer amount of context information available for adaptation places a heightened burden on application developers as they must manage and utilize vast amounts of... View full abstract»

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  • Support for managing design-time decisions

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s):299 - 314
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3142 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The desirability of maintaining multiple stakeholders' interests during the software design process argues for leaving choices undecided as long as possible. Yet, any form of underspecification, either missing information or undecided choices, must be resolved before automated analysis tools can be used. This paper demonstrates how constraint satisfaction problem solution techniques (CSTs) can be ... View full abstract»

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  • A study of design characteristics in evolving software using stability as a criterion

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s):315 - 329
    Cited by:  Papers (19)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2750 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    There are many ideas in software design that are considered good practice. However, research is still needed to validate their contributions to software maintenance. This paper presents a method for examining software systems that have been actively maintained and used over the long term and are potential candidates for yielding lessons about design. The method relies on a criterion of stability a... View full abstract»

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  • X-FEDERATE: a policy engineering framework for federated access management

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s):330 - 346
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5682 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Policy-based management (PBM) has been considered as a promising approach for design and enforcement of access management policies for distributed systems. The increasing shift toward federated information sharing in the organizational landscape, however, calls for revisiting current PBM approaches to satisfy the unique security requirements of the federated paradigm. This presents a twofold chall... View full abstract»

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  • A note on inconsistent axioms in Rushby's "systematic formal verification for fault-tolerant time-triggered algorithms"

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s):347 - 348
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (65 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    We describe some inconsistencies in John Rushby's axiomatization of time-triggered algorithms that he presented in these transactions and that he formally specifies and verifies in the mechanical theorem-prover PVS. We present corrections for these inconsistencies that have been checked for consistency in PVS View full abstract»

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  • TSE Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2006, Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org