Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, single article purchases and IEEE account management will be unavailable from 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM ET (12:00 - 21:00 UTC). We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Power Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 2006

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 73
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1 - 454
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (51 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Power Systems publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (38 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A versatile cluster-based real-time digital simulator for power engineering research

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 455 - 465
    Cited by:  Papers (47)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1528 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the development of a unique parallel and distributed real-time digital simulator for power engineering research at the University of Alberta. The simulator is built entirely from commodity-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components, making it very flexible and scalable. In parallel multi-tasking operations, a combination of real-time Linux operating system and an ultra-fast network forms the backbone for the internal communication between the 16 powerful processors of the Xeon-Cluster. Field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based multi-channel digital and analog I/O ports are interfaced to communicate with the external hardware components. The model development software utilized for power applications is based on the highly customizable industry-standard MATLAB/SIMULINK environment. A detailed case study of the real-time simulation of a three-level 12-pulse vector-controlled ac drive is presented to illustrate the precision capabilities of the simulator. Multiple integration algorithms and multirate computation have been applied for the simulation of the system, with slow (machine) and fast (converter) dynamic components. Real-time simulation of the entire system has been achieved with a maximum computation time of 5.35 μs on a step-size of 10 μs for the first time. Results obtained from the real-time simulation have been validated with an offline simulation using PSCAD/EMTDC. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cost of transmission system usage based on an economic measure

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 466 - 473
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Throughout today's unbundled power systems, it is assumed that the transmission system is a natural monopoly, and therefore, it should be regulated. To compensate for the revenue requirements of the owners of the transmission system and encourage its future expansion, transmission pricing schemes should be designed fairly. Also the schemes must aim to achieve the objective of maintaining system security by encouraging proper operation and maintenance of existing and investment in new facilities. In this paper, based on a simple economic principle, a novel method for allocation of the fixed cost of the transmission system to agents using these facilities is developed. This new method introduces the concept of critical capacity of a line and considers congestion in the transmission system to allocate the share of the transmission system revenue requirement that each agent has to provide. Identifying and charging the agents who cause congestion is very important as it sends the correct economic signal to transmission network users. This is a novel feature of this method, thus making it most suitable for systems where congestion does occur. We also point out briefly the reliability concerns of the new method. A simple eight-bus network representative of the PJM-ISO system together with its market pricing mechanism is used as a competitive power system to illustrate the main features of the proposed method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A new methodology for probabilistic short-circuit evaluation with applications in power quality analysis

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 474 - 479
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (240 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The main aim of this paper is to propose a probabilistic short-circuit approach to generate the probability distributions of the System Average RMS Variation Index (SARFI) index. The proposed methodology is based on the combination of the admittance summation method in phase coordinates with the Monte Carlo method. This new approach has been tested in a feeder belonging to an electricity distribution company in the Northeast of Brazil to generate the probability distributions of the SARFI index. The tests results demonstrated that the proposed model is a powerful tool to stochastic prediction of voltage sags. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An initialization procedure in solving optimal power flow by genetic algorithm

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 480 - 487
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (280 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The recently published idea of treating voltage angles at generator-buses as control variables enables to obtain voltages at load-buses with less computation. However, application of this approach in solving the optimal power flow problem by genetic algorithms may be ineffective if starting values of voltage angles are selected quite randomly. To overcome these difficulties, a new procedure for selection of an initial set of complex voltages at generator-buses is proposed in this paper. With this procedure, one can start the optimization process (i.e., genetic algorithm) with a set of control variables, causing few or no violations of constraints. The application of voltage angles at generator-buses as control variables and the proposed initialization procedure is illustrated on the IEEE test systems. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with the results from the literature. They are competitive, with computational time drastically reduced. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimizing demand-side bids in day-ahead electricity markets

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 488 - 498
    Cited by:  Papers (36)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a model of a purchaser of electricity in Norway, bidding into a wholesale electricity pool market that operates a day ahead of dispatch. The purchaser must arrange purchase for an uncertain demand that occurs the following day. Deviations from the day-ahead purchase are bought in a secondary market at a price that differs from the day-ahead price by virtue of regulating offers submitted by generators. Under an assumption that arbitrageurs are absent in these markets, we study conditions under which the purchaser should bid their expected demand and examine the two-period game played between a single generator and purchaser in the presence of a competitive fringe. In all our models, it is found that purchasers have an incentive to underbid their expected demand, and so the day-ahead prices will be below expected real-time prices. We also derive conditions on the optimal demand curve that purchasers should bid if the behavior of the other participants is unknown but can be modeled by a market distribution function. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An empirical method of dynamic oligopoly behavior analysis in electricity markets

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 499 - 506
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    Evidence of market power existing in the electricity markets has been empirically revealed, but the understanding of the market structure and generation companies' (GENCOs') strategic behaviors underlying the market power is far from satisfactory. This paper presents a theory and method for estimating the conjectural variations of GENCOs. Based on these estimates of conjectural variations in an actual electricity market, an empirical methodology is also proposed to analyze the dynamic oligopoly behaviors underlying market power. This is not only useful for system regulators to analyze the market structure but also to recognize and control the market power accordingly. The Australia National Electricity Market is used as the simulation case to test the proposed method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A probabilistic load flow method considering branch outages

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 507 - 514
    Cited by:  Papers (39)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a probabilistic load flow method considering random branch outages as well as uncertainties of nodal power injections. Branch outages are simulated by fictitious power injections at the corresponding nodes. A unified procedure is given to deal with random branch outages, generating unit outages, and load uncertainties by their moments and cumulants. The variations of nodal voltages and line flows produced by normally and discretely distributed input variables are handled separately. The method proposed by Von Mises is employed to solve the discrete distribution part of each state and output variable. The final distribution of a desired variable is obtained by simply convoluting its continuous and discrete distribution part. Results of 24-bus IEEE Reliability Test System are analyzed and compared to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. A numerical test on a real power system shows the effectiveness of the proposed method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An application of interval analysis and optimization to electric energy markets

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 515 - 523
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (472 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we address the issue of quantifying model uncertainties in a deregulated power market. We are interested in a worst-case analysis of effects of network parameter uncertainties on optimization problems that are solved on the level of an independent system operator (ISO). The focus is on linear programming (LP) formulations because of their practical relevance. After briefly reviewing applications of different interval analysis tools (interval matrix inversion and various contractors and solvers for systems of interval equations), we propose two tailored algorithms. In the first (basic LP approach), we propose another solver for a system of linear interval equations, while in the second (power system-customized LP approach), we use features of the power system model to reduce the width of the interval solution. The interval-based results are compared with a deterministic robust noninterval matrix inversion-based solution of a model of the benchmark 68-node New England/New York interconnected power system. Presented analyzes demonstrate that even small parameter variations can have significant impact on optimization. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Investigating distributed generation systems performance using Monte Carlo simulation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 524 - 532
    Cited by:  Papers (46)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (896 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel algorithm to evaluate the performance of electric distribution systems, including distributed generation (DG) is proposed. This algorithm addresses the deterministic and the stochastic natures of these electrical systems. Monte Carlo simulation is employed to solve the system operation randomness problem, taking into consideration the system operation constraints. The uncertainties in the locations, exported penetration level, and the states (on or off) of the DG units constitute the random parameters of the studied systems. The introduced algorithm incorporates these parameters with the traditional Newton-Raphson solution of the power flow equations. Monte Carlo simulation is implemented to perform the analysis of all the possible operation scenarios of the system under study and thus ensure the validity of the results. The proposed algorithm is employed to obtain the hourly power flow solution for a typical DG connected system. The system loading follows several typical load curves based on load bus types. Furthermore, new hourly steady-state operating system parameters are evaluated to describe the system behavior under the DG random operation. The results obtained are presented and discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Assessment of energy distribution losses for increasing penetration of distributed generation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 533 - 540
    Cited by:  Papers (127)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (264 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    High levels of penetration of distributed generation (DG) are a new challenge for traditional electric power systems. Power injections from DGs change network power flows modifying energy losses. Although it is considered that DG reduce losses, this paper shows that this is not always true. This paper presents an approach to compute annual energy losses variations when different penetration and concentration levels of DG are connected to a distribution network. In addition, the impact on losses of different DG technologies, such as combined heat and power, wind power, photovoltaic, and fuel-cells, is analyzed. Results show that energy losses variation, as a function of the DG penetration level, presents a characteristic U-shape trajectory. Moreover, when DG units are more dispersed along network feeders, higher losses reduction can be expected. Regarding DG technologies, it should be noted that wind power is the one that shows the worst behavior in losses reduction. Finally, DG units with reactive power control provide a better network voltage profile and lower losses. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimal power flow with expected security costs

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 541 - 547
    Cited by:  Papers (33)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the expected-security-cost optimal power flow (ESCOPF) problem. The objective of the problem is to minimize the expected total cost of system operation subject to power system constraints and expected security costs. The probabilities of operating in the pre-contingency operating state and the probabilities of operating in all possible post-contingency states are considered. In addition, the ESCOPF problem includes the cost of interrupting customer load and the cost of generator ramping, which may be necessary when a contingency occurs. The solution to the ESCOPF problem gives information regarding the marginal value of spinning reserve and the marginal value of interruptible load. A graphical tool is used to view the problem solution. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • EPOCHS: a platform for agent-based electric power and communication simulation built from commercial off-the-shelf components

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 548 - 558
    Cited by:  Papers (73)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports on the development and subsequent use of the electric power and communication synchronizing simulator (EPOCHS), a distributed simulation environment. Existing electric power simulation tools accurately model power systems of the past, which were controlled as large regional power pools without significant communication elements. However, as power systems increasingly turn to protection and control systems that make use of computer networks, these simulators are less and less capable of predicting the likely behavior of the resulting power grids. Similarly, the tools used to evaluate new communication protocols and systems have been developed without attention to the roles they might play in power scenarios. EPOCHS integrates multiple research and commercial off-the-shelf systems to bridge the gap. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applying multi-agent system technology in practice: automated management and analysis of SCADA and digital fault recorder data

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 559 - 567
    Cited by:  Papers (59)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports on the use of multi-agent system technology to automate the management and analysis of SCADA and digital fault recorder (DFR) data. The multi-agent system, entitled Protection Engineering Diagnostic Agents (PEDA), integrates legacy intelligent systems that analyze SCADA and DFR data to provide data management and online diagnostic information to protection engineers. Since November 2004, PEDA agents have been intelligently interpreting and managing data online at a transmission system operator in the U.K. As the results presented in this paper demonstrate, PEDA supports protection engineers by providing access to interpreted power systems data via the corporate intranet within minutes of the data being received. In this paper, the authors discuss their experience of developing a multi-agent system that is robust enough for continual online use within the power industry. The use of existing agent development toolsets and standards is also discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Payment cost minimization auction for deregulated electricity markets using surrogate optimization

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 568 - 578
    Cited by:  Papers (27)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (672 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Deregulated electricity markets use an auction mechanism to select offers and their power levels for energy and ancillary services. A settlement mechanism is then used to determine the payments resulting from the selected offers. Currently, most independent system operators (ISOs) in the United States use an auction mechanism that minimizes the total offer costs but determine payment costs using a settlement mechanism that pays uniform market clearing prices (MCPs) to all selected offers. Under this setup, the auction and settlement mechanisms are inconsistent since minimized costs are different from payment costs. Illustrative examples in the literature have shown that for a given set of offers, if an auction mechanism that directly minimizes the payment costs is used, then payment costs can be significantly reduced as compared to minimizing offer costs. This observation has led to discussions among stakeholders and policymakers in the electricity markets as to which of the two auction mechanisms is more appropriate for ISOs to use. While methods for minimizing offer costs abound, limited approaches for minimization of payment costs have been reported. This paper presents an effective method for directly minimizing payment costs. In view of the specific features of the problem including the nonseparability of its objective function, the discontinuity of offer curves, and the maximum term in defining MCPs, our key idea is to use augmented Lagrangian relaxation and to form and solve offer and MCP subproblems by using the surrogate optimization framework. Numerical testing results demonstrate that the method is effective, and the resulting payment costs are significantly lower than what are obtained by minimizing the offer costs for a given set of offers. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cumulant-based stochastic nonlinear programming for variance constrained voltage stability analysis of power systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 579 - 585
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (208 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a Cumulant Method-based solution to solve a maximum loading problem incorporating a constraint on the maximum variance of the loading parameter. The proposed method takes advantage of some properties regarding saddle node bifurcations to create a linear mapping relationship between random bus loading variables and all other system variables. The proposed methodology is tested using a sample system based on the IEEE 30-bus system using random active and reactive bus loading. Monte Carlo simulations consisting of 10 000 samples are used as a reference solution for evaluation of the accuracy of the proposed method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Identification of network parameter errors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 586 - 592
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a simple yet effective method for identifying incorrect parameters associated with the power network model. The proposed method has the desired property of distinguishing between bad analog measurements and incorrect network parameters, even when they appear simultaneously. This is accomplished without expanding the state or the measurement vectors. There is also no need to a priori specify a suspect parameter set. All these features are verified via simulations that are carried out using different-size test systems for various possible cases. Implementation of the method involves minor changes in the weighted least-squares state estimation code; hence, it can be easily integrated into existing state estimators as an added feature. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Coordinated fuzzy constrained optimal power dispatch for bilateral contract, balancing electricity, and ancillary services markets

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 593 - 604
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (832 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper proposes a coordinated fuzzy constrained optimal power dispatch (CFCOPD) algorithm for bilateral contract, balancing electricity, and ancillary services markets. The CFCOPD problem is decomposed into social welfare fuzzy maximization subproblem, which is solved by mixed-integer fuzzy linear programming (MIFLP), and combined reactive power cost and cost of real power loss fuzzy minimization subproblem, which is solved by fuzzy linear programming (FLP). The proposed CFCOPD algorithm is tested on the modified IEEE 30-bus system and the Thai power 424-bus system. The dispatch results show that the social welfare of the fuzzy constrained competitive electricity and ancillary services price (CEASP) scheme with bilateral contract curtailment bids is higher than those of competitive electricity price (CEP) scheme and CEASP scheme with and without bilateral contract curtailment bids, leading to a lower average electricity price. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling of supply interruptions in MV cable distribution networks for a more accurate estimation of the cost of penalty payments

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 605 - 610
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a comparison of the accuracy of several approaches to modeling the annual number of supply interruptions and their duration in an MV municipal cable distribution network when estimating the costs of penalty payments to be paid by the given distribution company to individual consumers as a result of breaching the guaranteed standards of supply continuity. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Development of power flow software using design patterns

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 611 - 618
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  

    Application of object-oriented design patterns for the development of power system computation software is presented. Important patterns such as "Iterator," "Decorator," and "Template Method" are utilized to develop a comprehensive power flow (load flow) analysis program, including FACTS devices such as SVC, TCSC, STATCOM, and UPFC. Analysis-independent object models of power system components are obtained by untying the attributes required for computation from the attributes representing the physical characteristics of an object. The proposed object-oriented design of power flow computation has been implemented in C++ on windows environment. The performance of the developed program has been tested with IEEE benchmark systems. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A new method for fast dynamic simulation of power systems

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 619 - 628
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (400 KB)  

    A new simultaneous-solution approach named the sub-tree reduction method is proposed for fast dynamic simulation of large-scale interconnected power system. In this method, a power system is represented by a component tree; the correction factors in Newton iteration of system simulation are calculated by a tree-traversing procedure called forward reduction and backward evaluation. This method can remarkably reduce computation burden of the Newton-type simultaneous-solution approach with greater programming flexibility. Case studies on two power systems verify the correctness and efficiency of this method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Nash equilibrium in strategic bidding: a binary expansion approach

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 629 - 638
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    This paper presents a mixed integer linear programming solution approach for the equilibrium problem with equilibrium constraints (EPEC) problem of finding the Nash equilibrium (NE) in strategic bidding in short-term electricity markets. A binary expansion (BE) scheme is used to transform the nonlinear, nonconvex, NE problem into a mixed integer linear problem (MILP), which can be solved by commercially available computational systems. The BE scheme can be applicable to Cournot, Bertrand, or joint price/quantity bidding models. The approach is illustrated in case studies with configurations derived from the 95-GW Brazilian system, including unit-commitment decisions to the price-maker agents. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Allocation of fixed costs in distribution networks with distributed generation

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 639 - 652
    Cited by:  Papers (20)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (944 KB)  

    In this paper, we propose a method for the allocation of fixed (capital and nonvariable operation and maintenance) costs at the medium voltage (MV) distribution level. The method is derived from the philosophy behind the widely used MW-mile methodology for transmission networks that bases fixed cost allocations on the "extent of use" that is derived from load flows. We calculate the "extent of use" by multiplying the total consumption or generation at a busbar by the marginal current variations, or power to current distribution factors (PIDFs) that an increment of active and reactive power consumed, or generated in the case of distributed generation, at each busbar, produces in each circuit. These PIDFs are analogous to power transfer distribution factors (PTDFs). Unlike traditional tariff designs that average fixed costs on a per kWh basis across all customers, the proposed method provides more cost-reflective price signals and helps eliminate possible cross-subsidies that deter profitable (in the case of competition) or cost-effective (in the case of a fully regulated industry) deployment of DG by directly accounting for use and location in the allocation of fixed costs. An application of this method for a rural radial distribution network is presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Allocation of unit start-up costs using Cooperative game theory

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 653 - 662
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (352 KB)  

    This paper discusses a three-part generation offer strategy that enables generators to put in unbundled variable operating costs and fixed start-up/no-load costs. We then propose methods based on cost sharing axioms to allocate fixed start-up/no-load costs among electricity consumers/load/retailers that take into account equity and rationality considerations. We focus on the single period cost allocation first. We apply three well-known game theoretic axioms: the core, the nucleolus, and the Shapley value. We discuss the relative merits and demerits of each criterion and also explore certain theoretical conditions for the existence of the core and the Shapley value lying inside the core. Finally, the multiperiod start-up cost allocation problem is studied. Allocations based on individual periods vis-a`-vis composite allocation for all periods are compared and contrasted. Numerical examples are used to illustrate all theoretical concepts. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

Covers the requirements, planning, analysis, reliability, operation, and economics of electric generating, transmission, and distribution systems for general industrial, commercial, public, and domestic consumption.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Antonio J. Conejo
The Ohio State University