By Topic

Vehicular Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Nov. 1976

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (127 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest editorial

    Page(s): 95 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • EMS communications development: History and commentary

    Page(s): 97 - 100
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (459 KB)  

    The history of emergency medical services (EMS) communication systems development from the FCC's first allocation of frequencies for hospitals and ambulances up to the present is discussed. Up until the late 1960's EMS communication systems were virtually nonexistent. Most early networks were developed by hospital associations for coordination of hospital disaster operations. Many significant changes were seeded in 1966. By 1968, ambulance-to-hospital communications was growing in importance. Advanced life support systems were introduced into the United States with the aid of biomedical telemetry systems. These two separate systems have been effectively linked with the aid of Docket 19880 and the "common system" approach. The road ahead looks clear. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A common systems approach to emergency medical communications

    Page(s): 100 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (461 KB)  

    An effective communications capability is an absolute necessity to the success of any emergency medical services system. This paper discusses the common systems approach adopted in Docket 19880 as the most effective way to provide for today's medical communications requirements. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Emergency medical services systems development: A national initiative

    Page(s): 104 - 115
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1365 KB)  

    The passage of the Emergency Medical Services Systems (EMSS) Act of 1973 by Congress has provided the mechanism and funds for communities to develop regional EMS delivery systems across the Nation. With the passage of the EMSS Act, the Congress mandated that emergency medical care programs funded with Federal dollars must address, plan, and implement a "systems approach" for the provision of emergency response and medical care. In the EMSS Act, some fifteen component requirements have been identified to assist system planners, coordinators, and operators in their attempts to establish comprehensive, areawide and regional EMS programs. These components are: manpower, training, communications, transportation, facilities critical care units, public safety agencies, consumer participation, accessibility to care, transfer agreements, standard medical record keeping, consumer information and education, evaluation, disaster linkage, and mutual aid agreements. Development of a national program, its projects, and progress, is the basis of this report. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Regional emergency medical communications systems

    Page(s): 115 - 118
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (393 KB)  

    The lack of adequate area-wide communications and the absence of institutions responsible for coordinating regional emergency care services represents a problem of major dimensions to this country. Each year over 115,000 people die from accidents, and more than 50 million are injured. Estimates go as high as 90,000 lives a year that could be saved with adequate emergency care. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's program, which is described, is aimed at generating a national effort to establish well planned regional emergency medical communications systems to coordinate emergency and disaster medical services throughout relatively large geographic areas or population centers. Such communications systems have been tried successfully in a number of cities. What has been missing is the wherewithal, both financially and professionally. to implement a sufficient number of similar programs to speed the wide adoption of there systems within the structure of American medical care. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The organizational impact of docket 19880

    Page(s): 119 - 121
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1781 KB)  

    The field of emergency medical services (EMS)provides an organizational and operational environment which lacks the geopolitical structure and discipline of other public safety services. The opportunity to rearrange the various service provider elements of EMS into a unified regional agency is not likely in current political and economic circumstances. The new EMS radio communications structure which has evolved from Federal Communications Commission Docket 19880 provides the opportunity for operational order and discipline within the various provider elements of EMS. Despite the opportunity for creating the common system approach to EMS communications, many human elements must be dealt with in breaking down traditional barriers to change. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Problems in EMS planning and communications

    Page(s): 122 - 128
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (835 KB)  

    The evolution of modern-day emergency medical service (EMS) systems is briefly described and the problems in implementing such systems are discussed. The communication needs and the actions of the Federal Communications Commission are discussed as they relate to present day activities. The problems in planning and implementing an EMS system are discussed with recommendations on methods to resolve problems. The needs for system planning for wide geographic areas are considered of paramount importance. The rapid emergence of a newly developing service delivered by private enterprise, as well as local government, does not detract from the responsibility of local government to assure that such services are provided. EMS is considered to be the third force of emergency services, with police and fire being the two recognized established ones. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An evaluation methodology for multielement emergency medical services systems

    Page(s): 128 - 141
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1093 KB)  

    The provision of efficient public safety services continues to be one of the high priority efforts to improve the quality of life in our nation. These efforts are too often equipment oriented without realizing the system input of providing better services in terms of benefit to the public as opposed to providers of the services. These services are multielement containing many items which can be quantified and qualitative aspects which are difficult to assess. The methodology presented herein is designed to specifically evaluate such multi-element systems in a logical manner. Its use expanded to other than emergency medical service systems will permit weak areas to be identified, develop comparisions and rank system elements as to their individual contributions to "bottom line" results, and to help establish priorities for allocation of funding resources. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Arizona's rural emergency medical services communications system

    Page(s): 142 - 153
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (810 KB)  

    In 1972, the Arizona State Legislature established the Division of Emergency Medical Services within the Arizona Department of Public Safety (DPS). As a part of the legislation, the Legislature charged the Director of the DPS with the responsibility for the establishment, operation, and maintenance of the Statewide Emergency Meidcal Services Communications System (EMSCOM). This system was to have the capability of providing for intercommunication of all law enforcement agencies and personnel, ambulances, ambulance services and dispatchers, and emergency receiving facilities and other health care institutions and medical practitioners. With financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, the Department of Public Safety embarked upon a demonstration program of developing an EMSCOM across the northern part of the State of Arizona. The primary aim of the program was to find the most effective means of providing two-way voice communications between the various elements of the EMS system over large geographic areas with a very sparse population located in relatively few population centers. The UHF system-designed, purchased, and installed prior to new EMS frequencies, made available by the Federal Communications Commission by their rule making in Docket #19880-presented a number of technical and operational problems related to radio signal propagation charactersitics over our large geographic areas and rugged terrain. Efforts to minimize the geographic signal propagation problems resulted in the incorporation of receiver voting-as well as associated transmitter selection-techniques. Design of the dispatch control console incorporated features to allow the console operator to communicate with all hospitals, ambulance drivers, and paramedics over the entire area of operation. The control console also incorporated the use of telephone patching equipment to allow all elements of the EMS system to communicate with each other through two-way rad- o, microwave, and telephone facilities. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Centralized UHF emergency medical communications in New Mexico

    Page(s): 153 - 157
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1758 KB)  

    A statewide emergency medical radio communications UHF network is operational in New Mexico 1) to link larger medical facilities to the state's sparsely populated rural areas, which have limited or no medical resources and marginal telephone communications, and 2) to assist callers in notifying local medical help, including backup ambulance dispatch capability. Radios have been installed in 95 percent of all certified ambulance and fire rescue services, all hospitals, and many clinics. Three RWJF grantees-the State EMS Division, Presbyterian Medical Services, and the Navajo Health Authority-have coordinated responsibility for UHF equipment installation, operation, maintenance, and public education. The centralized component of the network is maintained by two centers: Medical Crisis Center (MCC) and Santa Fe Control (SFC). Statewide telephone access and dispatch is provided through a 24-h View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A medical emergency radio communications system (MERCS) for the state of West Virginia

    Page(s): 158 - 161
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (385 KB)  

    The Medical Emergency Radio Communication System (MERCS) for OH-9 illustrates a new system of emergency medical services (EMS) communications planned for the State of West Virginia. MERCS will be the first multicounty system to be implemented in the State-and will serve as a model for other areas. MERCS will provide a centrally coordinated system of EMS communications for the mountainous rural area of Southern West Virginia. It will exploit the rules of the FCC that provide for use of multichannel equipments and a system of full channel (UHF) mobile relay stations. A vehicle fitted for MERCS will be able to communicate on a common basis through any mobile relay in the system. The mobile relays will provide for communication among all participating public safety agencies, utilizing cross banding where appropriate for interface with the systems of cooperating public safety agencies. The result will be a fully integrated system of communications for EMS. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Emergency medical services (EMS) communications: Conservation of time

    Page(s): 161 - 167
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (815 KB)  

    Although adequate means for emergency communications are available, their utilization in daily emergencies and during medical disasters is amazingly inefficient. This phase of emergency health services is undergoing rapid expansion and improvement. These changes will narrow the time gap between the onset of an acute illness or injury and the implementation of techniques of monitoring and skilled management and care. The communications problems which have caused the medical field to lag far behind other emergency services can mostly be solved by existing knowledge and techniques. No longer should communications systems be designed for the exclusive use of one service or agency. First the emergency medical services (EMS) system must precede the communications subsystem. Only after the community has clearly defined its emergency medical needs and has designed a system to meet those needs should it look for the communication equipment that will serve to tie together the various elements of the system. This article defines the functions of communication, identifies communications systems requirements, and recommends means of implementing EMS communication networks. When these recommendations and plans are put into effect the emergency medical communications system will be the most widely utilized, coordinated, and sophisticated emergency communications systems within the area it serves. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • EMS biomedical telemetry systems

    Page(s): 168 - 170
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (345 KB)  

    The development of biomedical telemetry systems involves design activities from numerous and varied engineering disciplines. The system design considerations are numerous; involving communications, biomedical science, transportation, personnel training, medico-legal problems, etc.. Manufacturers of biomedical telemetry equipment are competing in an emerging field with unsettled requirements, and with regulations by both the FCC and FDA. The development of more universal and more reliable systems is foreseen. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Electronic equipment requirements for emergency medical service systems

    Page(s): 171 - 172
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (200 KB)  

    Specifications and related documentation dealing with design requirements for electronic equipment used in EMS systems are reviewed and relevant portions cataloged. Where appropriate specifications do not exist, criteria are suggested for the operational, environmental, and functional performance standards to be used for the equipment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Emergency medical services communication system design

    Page(s): 172 - 175
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (511 KB)  

    Emergency medical service (EMS) communication system design is discussed. The emphasis is on the development of communication systems to meet the needs of a patient in a medical emergency. Specific factors influencing patient-side portable communications are presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The role of communication systems in emergency medical services

    Page(s): 175 - 186
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (661 KB)  

    The important role that land mobile communication systems play in the effective operation of an emergency medical services (EMS) system is discussed. The need for EMS systems, classification of types of communication subsystems, FCC Rules and Regulations for EMS, what to do before designing communication systems, and examples of several systems are given. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Appendix I: Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations special emergency radio service

    Page(s): 187 - 191
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (615 KB)  

    The salient portions of these Rules and Regulations, which pertain specifically to EMS communications, are shown in boldface print. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Office of telecommunications policy proposed biomedical telemetry standard for emergency medical communications march 1975

    Page(s): 191 - 192
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (216 KB)  

    This standard defines the minimum requirements for a multiplex or nonmultiplex voice/telemetry channel to assure compatibility and interoperability of portable physiologic monitoring equipment with both radio and telephone equipments and hospital emergency and display devices. Specifically, it defines a National telemetry subcarrier frequency within the voice band which is compatible with both radio and telephone transmission characteristics. This standard applies only to voice and telemetry modulation-demodulation electronic instrumentation used in emergency medical care. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (832 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology covers land, airborne, and maritime mobile services, vehicular electrotechnology, equipment, and systems identified with the automotive industry.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuguang Michael Fang
University of Florida