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Vehicular Technology, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 1974

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • [Front cover and table of contents]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Propulsion systems for electric cars

    Page(s): 61 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1085 KB)  

    Proper selection of the propulsion system to meet the requirements of an electric passenger vehicle is of prime importance. Choice may be made among alternating current, direct current, or combined systems. Each approach can be implemented by utilizing various control techniques and power elements. For instance, an ac system may use an adjustable voltage inverter (AVI) or a pulse-width-modulated inverter (PWMI) for the power processor, and an induction motor or a synchronous motor for the rotating element. Similar alternatives exist for a dc system. The choice of a suitable manner of implementation must be. based on information characterizing the various elements and tradeoffs matching them to the vehicle requirements. This paper describes various ac and dc techniques, characterizes AVI, PWM, and representative dc chopper power processors and examines their interface with a variety of motors such as series, shunt, induction, etc. View full abstract»

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  • Measurements of amplitude probability distributions and power of automobile ignition noise at HF

    Page(s): 72 - 83
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    Measurements of the amplitude probability distribution (APD) of the envelope and measurements of other parameters of automobile ignition noise were made at frequencies between 24 and 30 MHz. The measurements were conducted at a quiet site where several single stationary vehicles were operated at engine speeds corresponding to idle and cruise. Measurements were also made at two distances near a freeway, for light traffic (approximately 20 vehicles per min) and for heavy traffic (approximately 45 vehicles per min). The principal instrumentation consisted of several phase-stable receivers with coherent quadrature detectors whose outputs were digitized at a rate of 200 samples per quadrature component per second and recorded on magnetic tape for computer processing. About 10 min of data (about 120 000 samples) were obtained during each measurement. The computer plotted the APD on a Rayleigh scale in dB relative to thermal noise and calculated the mean noise power available at the antenna terminals (related by a constant to the noise factor Fa) and Vd--the ratio in dB of rms to average voltage. The average power of the ignition noise increases with engine r/min and Vdusually decreases. Near a freeway, most of the noise is contributed by a small number of very noisy vehicles. The APD's for various situations are strikingly similar; all show that most of the noise envelope samples in a measurement are Rayleigh distributed. A small percentage of the noise samples do not follow the Rayleigh distribution, but are of higher amplitude. This percentage is higher for an engine at cruise speed than at idle speed, and higher for heavy traffic than for light traffic. View full abstract»

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  • The use of a minicomputer for on-line control of a taxi fleet

    Page(s): 83 - 91
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    As a direct data interface between dispatcher and driver, a 4K minicomputer with a very efficient program helps resolve many thorny problems in large fleet dispatching. Data bursts of 300 mS at the beginning of each radio transmission reliably convey the identification and address information with little interference to voice transmissions. The concept of city-wide as opposed to zone coverage is feasible due to the even loading of dispatchers made possible by random access to any channel. Performance objectives of more rapid dispatching, improved load factor on vehicles, and better management are being met, with the result that an early expansion and the addition of other facilities is predicted. View full abstract»

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  • Magnetic gradient vehicle detector

    Page(s): 91 - 99
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    The design, analysis, and selected measurements of a new type of vehicle detector called a magnetic gradient vehicle detector (MGVD) that is under development by the Federal Highway Administration are described. The detector consists of a transducer buried in a transverse slot in the pavement surface. "Lead in" cables connect the transducer to roadside detector electronics. When a vehicle approaches the transducer, eddy currents are induced in the vehicle's undercarriage, front, and possibly side surfaces, and the resulting magnetic field is sensed by the transducer. The operating frequency of the detector is nominally 100 kHz. View full abstract»

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  • Synchronous longitudinal reference signal generation—An experimental study of its use in automatic vehicle control

    Page(s): 100 - 114
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    A method of obtaining a continuous reference signal for use in the synchronous longitudinal control of automated ground transport systems is presented and evaluated in preliminary full-scale tests. The results of the latter, which were obtained using a reference signal in conjunction with an instrumented vehicle at speeds from 0 to 46 ft/s over 1600 ft of roadway, are presented. Successful operation was achieved with both steady-state and time-varying velocity command signals. A significant finding, with respect to implementation of the method, was that the roadway environment introduces signal attenuation (2 dB/100 ft) that must be circumvented before practical long-distance operation can be achieved. However, with system refinement, the technique holds great promise for future implementation. View full abstract»

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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology covers land, airborne, and maritime mobile services, vehicular electrotechnology, equipment, and systems identified with the automotive industry.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Yuguang Michael Fang
University of Florida