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Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2  Part 3 • Date April 2006

 This issue contains several parts.Go to:  Part 1  | Part 2 

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
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  • Numerical Simulation of control of plasma flow with magnetic field for thermal protection in Earth reentry flight

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 409 - 420
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (816 KB)  

    The present numerical study examines the possibility and usefulness of the control of weakly ionized plasma flow ahead of a space vehicle by means of the magnetic field for thermal protection in earth reentry flight under the flight conditions at the altitudes from about 72 to 48 km along the real earth reentry trajectory of the blunt body OREX, which was used for an earth reentry experiment in 1994. Numerical results show that the aerodynamic heating can be reduced by applying the magnetic field at the altitude above about 55 km where the weakly ionized plasma is produced behind the bow shock wave, and also that the reduction amount of the aerodynamic heating by applying the magnetic field becomes larger with increasing the altitude. At the altitude of about 60 km, where the aerodynamic heating had the peak value in the OREX experiment, the wall heat flux at the stagnation point and the total aerodynamic heating over the wall surface with applying the magnetic field of about 0.5 T are, respectively, 85% and 67% of their values obtained without applying the magnetic field. View full abstract»

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  • On the effective diffusion length for microwave breakdown

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 421 - 430
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The concept of effective diffusion length, as a means to characterize diffusion losses in calculations of microwave breakdown in radio frequency (RF) devices with inhomogeneous electric fields, is discussed in detail with emphasis on geometrical situations where the inhomogeneity of the microwave electric field plays an important role for the breakdown threshold. In particular, good analytical approximations are found for the microwave breakdown threshold field, in a number of different geometrical situations. Finally, an explicit experimental example demonstrates how the effective diffusion length in a coaxial resonant filter structure can be inferred from a set of breakdown threshold data obtained for different pressures. View full abstract»

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  • Preliminary evidences of AC-run-away in femtosecond laser-matter interaction

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 431 - 434
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The role of collisional absorption is shown to be important at the beginning of the interaction between a laser pulse and matter, i.e., a plasma, while later on collective absorption phenomena take place. The scope of this paper is to present first results about the long predicted AC-run-away effect, defined as a sudden transition from a collisional absorption regime to a collective one, in ideal circumstances: for an ultrashort laser pulse, i.e., subpicosecond pulses, and with a sharp plasma boundary, i.e., without a laser prepulse. For this purpose, we use a kinetic model based on the ballistic theory. The model is of relevance to laser-matter interaction including laser nuclear fusion or laser particle acceleration. View full abstract»

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  • Multiphase driving system for LCD back-light lamps with current balancing feature

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 435 - 442
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (688 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a multiphase driving system for liquid crystal display (LCD) back-light lamps with current balancing feature. The driving system adopts multiple inverters operated with interleaving fashion to drive cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFL), which can reduce input current ripple. Additionally, to prevent current imbalance among lamps, a multiphase transformer is introduced in the proposed system. Compared with the conventional single-phase driving system, the proposed one can have the merit of requiring less number of transformers and lower input current ripple. A three-phase driving system with current balancing transformer has been built, from which experimental results have verified the feasibility of the proposed multiphase driving system. View full abstract»

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  • Power efficiency oriented optimal design of high density CCP and ICP sources for semiconductor RF plasma processing equipment

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 443 - 454
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (696 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the optimization of radio frequency (RF) power efficiency in the design of low pressure and high density capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources for semiconductor RF plasma processing equipment, based on the analysis of the effect of stray capacitance on the RF power efficiency in the plasma reactors. Historically, RF plasma processing chambers have been designed and operated using empirical methods. The electrical analysis in this paper reveals design guidelines for both CCP and ICP sources to maximize RF power efficiency by minimizing the stray capacitance in the hardware layout. It is also shown from the external electrical analysis that at low pressure, the ICP sources are usually more efficient than the CCP sources, which is in agreement with the existing experimental results on high density RF plasma sources though the associated micromechanism in plasma physics has remained to be explored. It is further concluded that the RF frequency for an ICP source should not be too high in order to avoid the deep capacitive operating region where an ICP source is inefficient. Besides, lower frequency bias RF power on the chuck has higher RF power efficiency. View full abstract»

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  • Space charge effects in Faraday cup ion detectors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 455 - 459
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Faraday cup ion detectors are widely used in the investigation of laser-produced plasmas. However, it is well known that these detectors are susceptible to space charge distortion of the ion signal. Although an analytical model describing the threshold condition for distortion was developed in 1970 by Green, this model has never been tested experimentally. In the present investigation, it is found that the analytic model derived by Green appears to be inadequate when compared in detail to experiments performed using KrF (248 nm, 15 ns) laser pulses incident on a graphite target at an intensity of 1.7×1010 W/cm2. By comparing the results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with these experiments, it has been discovered that electrons play an important role in the space charge distortion phenomenon. View full abstract»

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  • Long-pulse beam stability experiments on the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 460 - 466
    Cited by:  Papers (30)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB)  

    When completed, the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA, 17-MeV electron beam in a 1600-ns flat-top pulse. In initial tests, DARHT-II accelerated beams with current pulse lengths from 500 to 1200 ns full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) with more than 1.2-kA, 12.5-MeV peak current and energy. Experiments have now been done with a ∼1600-ns pulse length. These pulse lengths are all significantly longer than any other multimegaelectronvolt LIA, and they define a novel regime for high-current beam dynamics, especially with regard to beam stability. Although the initial tests demonstrated insignificant beam-breakup instability (BBU), the pulse length was too short to determine whether ion-hose instability would be present toward the end of a long, 1600-ns pulse. The 1600-ns pulse experiments reported here resolved these issues for the long-pulse DARHT-II LIA. View full abstract»

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  • Conduction and breakdown mechanismsin transformer oil

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 467 - 475
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
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    With a fast coaxial test setup using high speed electrical and optical diagnostics, prebreakdown current pulses and shadowgraphy images are measured for direct current (dc) breakdown in Univolt 61 transformer oil. Also, dc currents across the gap are measured using a high sensitivity electrometer. The conduction and breakdown mechanisms in transformer oil as function of applied hydrostatic pressures are quantified. Together, this information provides data on the development of current flow in the system. We have identified three stages in the conduction process prior to breakdown for highly nonuniform fields. Stage 1 is characterized by a resistive current at low fields. Increasing the applied electric field lowers the effective barrier at the metal/dielectric interface allowing a "tunneling" mechanism to begin, leading to the rapid rise in the injection current observed in stage 2. In stage 3, at high fields, the current reaches space charge saturation with an apparent mobility of 3·10-3 cm2/V·s prior to breakdown. The processes of final breakdown show a distinct polarity dependence. A strong pressure dependence of the breakdown voltage is recorded for negative needle/plane breakdown; a 50% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed when the hydrostatic pressure is lowered from atmospheric pressure to hundreds of mtorr. Positive needle discharges show a reduction of only about 10% in breakdown voltage for the reduced pressure case. Weak pressure dependence indicates the breakdown mechanism does not have a strong gaseous component. We will discuss possible links between conduction current and dc breakdown. View full abstract»

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  • Multipactor prediction for on-board spacecraft RF equipment with the MEST software tool

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 476 - 484
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1616 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Within the framework of a project sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA), we have developed a software tool to predict the occurrence of multipactor discharge in a simple radio frequency (RF) device modeled as parallel plates. The tool uses a micro-level explicit representation of the electrons (i.e., each electron in the system is modeled separately), and includes a detailed Monte Carlo model of the secondary electron emission process in the plates. Materials secondary emission yield (SEY) is described using either the usual parameter set (E1, E2, and σmax), or a more detailed model, where the contributions due to true secondary, backscattered or elastically reflected electrons are given their own sets of parameters, together with additional parameters for the angle dependence. The simulator has been validated using experimental data gathered at ESA and the Universidad Auto´noma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. The simulator helped in the selection of material coatings for the mitigation of Multipactor effect in RF transmission lines on-board satellite payloads. View full abstract»

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  • Diffusion of metal vapor from electrodes to the vacuum interrupter shield and its dependence on electrode construction

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 485 - 489
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (752 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a high-voltage vacuum interrupter, the insulation of the ceramic envelope and shield decreases significantly due to the deposition during arcing. To increase the voltage rating of a vacuum circuit breaker, the diffusion of metallic particles to the vacuum interrupter shield was investigated. Metallic diffusion of the axial magnetic field electrode construction was extremely small because, due to the effect of the magnetic field, plasma was confined and effectively ionized within it. Electrode erosion of the axial magnetic field electrode during arcing was also extremely small. View full abstract»

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  • A note on the use of dust plasma crystals as tunable THz filters

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 490 - 493
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We discuss theoretically the possible use of plasma crystals as tunable filters in the terahertz (THz) regime. Estimates of transmittance are based on previous analyses of crystalline colloid array filters that Bragg diffract incident light. We consider how the plasma crystal might be tuned magnetically if it is composed of paramagnetic dust grains. Varying an external magnetic field would change the spacing between the dust grains due to induced dipole forces, thus changing the diffracted wavelength. Some possible experimental parameters are discussed. View full abstract»

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    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 494
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    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 495
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    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 496
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  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c3
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IEEE Transactions on Plasma Sciences focuses on plasma science and engineering, including: magnetofluid dynamics and thermionics; plasma dynamics; gaseous electronics and arc technology.

 

 

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