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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 2006

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication publication information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c2
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  • Safe harbor and privacy protection: a looming issue for IT professionals

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 11
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (720 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The 25 European Union (EU) Member States require that their residents' personal information not be transferred to countries that do not protect that information adequately. In 2000, the EU ruled that the United States (US), through its voluntary Safe Harbor program, met that requirement. Since that time, however, the EU has charged that many US companies that claim to be in compliance with Safe Harbor policies are not. In this article, I report on a study of the privacy-policy statements of 20 randomly selected US companies that claim to be in compliance. Of the 20, 19 are not in compliance. This study argues that as EU Member States begin to examine Safe Harbor carefully, they are likely to force US companies to adhere to more stringent privacy policies. The burden of this adherence will be borne by US IT professionals. View full abstract»

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  • The functions of formulaic and nonformulaic compliments in interactions about technical writing

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 12 - 27
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Writing tutors are encouraged to use compliments in their interactions with technical writing students. However, the form of compliments strongly influences how they function. Specifically, formulaic compliments like "It's good" function differently from nonformulaic compliments like "The size is excellent in terms of visually aiding the reader." A total of 107 compliments were analyzed from 13 interactions between 12 writing tutors and 12 engineering students. About 61% of tutors' compliments followed one of six formulae, and about 39% were nonformulaic. Formulaic compliments were general and mainly performed a phatic function, filling pauses and avoiding silence, particularly in interaction closings. Nonformulaic compliments were more specific and individualized, and they may, therefore, be more instructive than formulaic compliments. Nonformulaic compliments also performed an exploratory function, allowing participants to renegotiate discourse status. This study points to other avenues of research, particularly research that systemically examines writers' perceptions of formulaic and nonformulaic feedback, such as compliments. View full abstract»

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  • An evaluation of the impact of social presence through Group size and the use of collaborative software on Group member "Voice" in face-to-face and computer-mediated task Groups

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 28 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1848 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Firms that are trying to stay competitive in the current business environment often require the use of groups. The popularity of group work is tied to the promise of improved productivity via the pooling of information, knowledge, and skills. In recent years, group work has been expanded to virtual or distributed environments. However, there are questions about how aspects of group work-specifically group size and social presence-impact group members' ability to voice opinions. This study examines groups of two sizes in three distinct social presence settings: face-to-face, face-to-face using collaborative software, and virtual using collaborative software. This study finds that both group size and social presence affect individual instrumental voice, value-expressive voice, and the group interaction process. The results show that by increasing social presence through the use of collaborative software, it is possible to lessen the negative impact of increasing group size. These results should be of interest to the increasing number of organizations that are implementing virtual group environments. View full abstract»

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  • Behavioral adaptation within cross-cultural virtual teams

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 44 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (261 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With today's business environments no longer confined to national borders, much work is undertaken in global virtual teams. Such teams consist of members located in different countries that communicate via technology media to complete a project task. Much of the research in this area has been focused on the technological aspects of such environments; there is, however, a lack of research into the behavioral aspects and the issue of cultural differences in particular. It has been acknowledged that when cultural diversity is neither recognized nor acted upon, significant challenges can arise for the team. Current advice in the literature suggests that team members should adapt their normal working behavior in consideration of cultural differences. However, there is little indication of how team members should do so. This study investigated if and/or how team members adapt their behavior in cross-cultural virtual teams. The results of this study indicate that team members can adapt their behavior in both spoken and written communication as well as allowing for religious beliefs and time zone differences. This paper discusses specifically how behavior can be adapted, including a discussion of behaviors that caused concern. Finally, a framework of behavioral adaptations is presented for ways to improve cross-cultural virtual team interactions. View full abstract»

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  • Team leaders' technology choice in virtual teams

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 57 - 68
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (184 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Virtual teams face challenges arising from geographical distance, cultural differences, and differing modes of interaction. Team leaders in particular face these challenges because they are primarily responsible for efficient team management. Technology choices made by leaders have become a focus of interest in communication studies, but questions regarding media choice in virtual teams have not been widely studied. This article describes an in-depth, ethnographic exploration of Finnish virtual team leaders who work in natural teams in organizational contexts. The principal goal was to examine their choice of communication technologies in daily work. The results indicate that the choice was based on four factors. First, there are two factors that are person-related: ACCESSIBILITY and SOCIAL DISTANCE. Accessibility refers to people's ease of access through a particular medium, and social distance suggests that the technology selection is based on the social distance between the persons involved. Second, there are two task-related factors: idea sharing and informing. These factors describe team leaders' media selection by the nature of the task at hand. The findings suggest that team leaders' technology choice can be partly explained by traditional media selection theories, but in virtual contexts, accessibility becomes an important determinant of which technology is chosen. View full abstract»

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  • Semantic network discussion representation: applicability and some potential benefits

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 69 - 81
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (368 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Collaborative tools typically employ linear threading for representing and organizing the contributions of the discussants. We argue that linear representations provide little support for the conceptualization, contextualization, and visualization of the discussion. To address these drawbacks, we propose the usage of semantic networks for representing discussions. In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of semantic network representation to discussions through the development of a prototype named CollectiveThought. We also test some of the potential benefits of semantic network discussion representation with an empirical study. More specifically, we compare these two modes of discussion representation (i.e., linear versus semantic network) in terms of effects on the communication process as measured by perceived contextualization and on the communication outcome as measured by mutual understanding, using both subjective and objective indicators. The results show that semantic network discussion representation leads to a higher level of perceived contextualization and better mutual understanding. View full abstract»

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  • Communication of Complex Information: User Goals and Information Needs for Dynamic Web Information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 82 - 84
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  • Study Skills: A Student Survival Guide

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 85 - 86
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  • Training and Development: Enhancing Communication and Leadership Skills

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 87 - 88
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  • Writing Selves/Writing Societies: Research From Activity Perspectives

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 89 - 90
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 91 - 92
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  • IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c3
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  • IEEE Professional Communication Society Information

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University