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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 20 of 20
  • Directory of IEEE-AESS personnel

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 49
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  • Barometric altimeter short-term accuracy analysis

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 24 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (163 KB)  

    Although it is mandatory to have at least one barometric altimeter installed in each and every aircraft flying within ally air traffic controlled regions to assure vertical separation, the absolute accuracy of such an instrument is rather poor and limited. Basically, a barometric altimeter is a pressure sensor. It measures the atmospheric static pressure and translates it to the vertical height using a predetermined formula. However, as long as all aircraft are equipped with the same kinds of instruments, the vertical separation in any controlled air space is assured. Until recent years, all flight levels (FL) above 290 must be separated by 2000 feet. It was accomplished this way primarily because of the unknown performance of barometric altimeters. By reason of increasing congestion in the air traffic routes near the North Atlantic, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of the US = conducted a series of flight tests near Cardiff Wales, UK, to determine whether the separation above FL 290 can be safely reduced to 1000 feet, which would result in doubling the available routes. During these flight tests, a Boeing 727 (tail number N40) was equipped with many recording devices as well as Global Positioning System (GPS). The GPS receiver had capabilities of measuring carrier phase of the received signals so that 3D positions with respect to WGS-84 during the entire flights can be determined down to centimeter accuracy. Among the four (4) takeoff-landing tests, the aircraft conducted these tests using two flying patterns alternatively: Figure-8 with flight level gradually increased from FL 290 to 410 and Racetrack with constant flight level. We observed that the barometric altimeter measurements resemble the kinematic GPS altitude closely except an apparent low frequency difference. In other words, the barometric altimeter had short term accuracy, which would be as good as the kinematic GPS. The objective of this paper is to document these findings. Based on the actual data, we conclude that barometric altimeters are extremely accurate sensors for altitude in the sense of short-term accuracy. View full abstract»

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  • AESS meetings & conferences

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 50
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  • TDMS for aviation software

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 15 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (271 KB)  

    Quality assurance and testing phase is one of the most crucial phases in the life cycle of computer software. Most aviation software, due to the possible life-threatening consequences of failures, is subjected to intense testing. Frequently, this results in generation of enormous unorganized raw data files. Such data needs to be further processed and analyzed to get a meaningful insight into potential problem areas with the software. In this paper, we present the results of our study on designing and implementing a test management system specifically designed for testing aviation software. The paper has three major contributions. First, we present a survey of existing work. Second, we discuss the design for a test data management system, TDMS. Finally, we discuss some implementation issues encountered during the TDMS development. View full abstract»

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  • Computational Electromagnetics for RF and Microwave Engineering - [Book Review]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 27 - 28
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  • Next generation space avionics: layered system implementation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 9 - 14
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (436 KB)  

    Advances in electronics over the past decade have produced major improvements in the power and flexibility of computer systems. Unfortunately current avionics systems for space applications typically have not leveraged these COTS advantages. A decade ago, the state-of-the-art for avionics systems made a step change to the Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) used in the Boeing 777. This next generation avionics architecture is not based upon traditional Byzantine redundancy structures, but on a truth-based scheme where each element knows when an internal failure occurs and removes itself from the system. IMA utilizes a lock-step microprocessor design that communicates to a COTS Backplane for input/output, and to a Virtual Backplane™ (a reliable high-speed serial bus) for intra-system communication. The system functions are implemented using a time and space partitioned operating system. The entire system provides the simplicity of a simplex system, implements the highest level of reliability providing complete flexibility to reconfigure both software applications and hardware interfaces, allows for rapid prototyping using low-cost COTS hardware, and is easily expandable beyond the initial point implementation. As the only 5th generation avionics architecture, the concepts incorporated into Honeywell's IMA are ideally suited to be the backbone of the next generation Space Exploration Program avionics architectures. View full abstract»

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  • 2005 Index - IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 37 - 48
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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 34
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  • Society news & information - From the editor-in-chief

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 31
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  • Aging avionics and net-centric operations

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 3 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (431 KB)  

    The transformation to net-centric operations necessitates evaluation of existing avionics capabilities, identification of deficiencies of these avionics for net-centric operations, and evaluation of alternative avionics that can provide the needed capabilities. The Global Information Grid (GIG) enables net-centric operations. The purpose of the GIG is to provide end users real-time or near-real-time access to multiple information sources ranging from airborne/satellite/ground sensors (video imagery and processed visual information/data) to databases. The end users in an aircraft view and interact with this information through the human system interface (HSI) or "smart" displays. The information is transmitted across a Gigabit Ethernet on-board the aircraft that interfaces with multiple channels of a software programmable radio that acts as a hub in the GIG network, or on-board sensors and processors. This paper presents the mandated capabilities, and the processes involved in determination of upgrades needed to achieve net-centric operations. View full abstract»

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  • GNSS receiver for GLONASS signal reception

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 21 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB)  

    This paper deals with the latest version of Experimental GNSS receiver built at the Czech Technical University and describes integration of GLONASS signal processing to the receiver. The new FPGA platform Virtex-D Pro by Xilinx is used and enables integration of whole digital signal processing of GNSS receiver into the single chip. The RE unit of the receiver is capable of processing all GLONASS frequency of the Li and L2 bands in two independent RE channels; each channel can process one band. The frequency selection of the appropriate satellite is accomplished in a digital correlator. The development flow of the GLONASS correlator is discussed herein. The complexity of the GLONASS correlator with complexity of GPS correlator is compared. The developed GLONASS correlator was tested in Simuelink tool during development. The next test was carried out using GLONASS simulator and real GLONASS satellite signal. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 0_1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • This month's cover …

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 0_2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - technically

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2
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  • Conference report - IRS 2005: International Radar Symposium

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 29 - 30
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  • Call for nominations

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 32
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  • Distinguished lecturers program

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 33
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  • Call for projects - All India student project contest: IEEE-India AES/Com/LEO Societies Chapter

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 35
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  • 2005 IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society - Membership Application

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 36
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
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Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
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tpace@sentech.dsci.com