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IT Professional

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2005

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Masthead

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IT expanding in new ways

    Publication Year: 2005
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (74 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    IT is poised for another expansion, this time to provide services globally and with a unified view. This year's final issue of IT Pro would focus on intelligent searching tools, knowledge discovery, Java scaling issues, business process engineering, and more. Hoping that these articles continue to expand the IT knowledge globally of its readers. View full abstract»

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  • News Briefs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 6 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (94 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    According to the Associated Press, momentum is building for a new standard protocol that will enable network operators to bridge the gaps between mobile provider's voice calls and data services. The current standard--Internet Protocol for Multimedia Subsystems (IMS)--will serve only as a springboard for convergence between future services, nearly all of which will need to be adapted or replaced over time. Despite the growth of phone and Internet services, such as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), most wireline and wireless calls aren't transmitted in IP from start-to-finish; calls get converted to traditional phone protocols on either or both ends. The new capabilities this new standard is expected to usher in--including using a cell phone to view live television broadcasts, check the program listings, program a digital video recorder, or even watch programs stored on that DVR--are forecast to arrive by mid-2006. A report released this past November on science and technology in the US entitled, "Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future," says that the future of IT in this country looks grim. Norman Augustine, former chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin Corporation and one of the main authors of the study, appeared before Congress to report on his findings. Among other factors contributing to what Augustine calls "a serious and intensifying challenge with regard to its future competitiveness and standard of living" in the US, he and his committee of 20 national science, technology, business, and policy experts said that the end of the Cold War, the expansion of aviation, and the development of technology have eliminated barriers and produced almost "three billion highly motivated, often well-educated, new capitalists" into the job market. According to technology research firm IDTechEx, postal and courier mail services are expected to become the second largest market for radio frequency identification (RFID) item-level tagging. The firm expects that by 2020 postal and carrier services will label one trillion packages and letters annually, making this the second largest application--following the retail sector--of RFID in the world. View full abstract»

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  • Mapping the course, marking the trail [personal knowledge management]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Personal knowledge management tools function to help humans consider their information assets and needs before searching, so they can ask insightful questions and form search request better. Extending this approach, Mitretek Systems designed and implemented a prototypes of two post-search tools to use after the initial search. The personal information extraction (PIE) tool helps the user build models to organize and explore the information in a collection of documents. The Knowledge Discovery Trails tool (KD trails) records the routes of information-foraging excursions, so people can share of repeat successful approaches. Tools such as these would let knowledge workers improve the ways they search for and manage information, helping them transform an instinctive behavior into a calculated process. View full abstract»

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  • Enterprise application integration: a manager's perspective

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 17 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To remain competitive, organizations must operate efficiently and be flexible enough to rapidly respond to changing market conditions. To meet the first challenge, IT managers must continually seek ways to support more effective and accurate business processes. The second challenge implies a need for systems that the organization can easily extend to meet new demands. Enterprise application integration (EAI) is a key technology in meeting this mandate. But before implementing a data-integration solution in an enterprise, an organisation should be aware of the technical risks as well as the operations involved in the integration process. This article examines the data-integration subset of EAI. In EAI, data integration is the automated sharing of relevant data between two or more applications. This article aims to provide IT managers with an overview of EAI's fundamental technical issues and solutions. View full abstract»

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  • Balanced scorecard: evening the odds of successful BPR

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 24 - 30
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To realize the benefits of costly business process reengineering, companies need a control mechanism that links performance evaluation to strategic objectives. Researchers have long addressed how to control, measure, and evaluate this business process reengineering (BRP), but many so-called solutions continue to focus almost exclusively on the technical aspects of change. In this article, we present a control and evaluation framework, BSC-IS (balanced scoreboard-information system) that integrates BSC and BPR in the context of an IS or ERP (enterprise resource planning) project. BSC-IS is viewed as the roots of a solid evaluation tool for companies struggling to make costly BPR pay off. View full abstract»

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  • Surveying the risks and benefits of IT outsourcing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 32 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (360 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article a survey of senior IT managers points to political and legal issues as the top risk concerns. These managers also say offshoring can create more jobs. Most companies consider offshore outsourcing as a way to reduce cost and increase efficiencies. Outsourcing can be a viable option for companies and can also help businesses and economies in the countries involved, as long as the outsourcing company objectively identifies and analyzes the benefits and risks. View full abstract»

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  • Whipping up some gourmet software

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 39 - 42
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A great chef's modus operandi can provide excellent lessons in how to achieve scale, while retaining quality in software development. Both remarkable software and superb cooking are a mix of science and art; of repetition and innovation; and of theory and intuition. From this blend comes practices that aim to balance quality, scale, and time pressures. Perhaps the most essential lesson is that there are no shortcuts to success. View full abstract»

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  • 2005 EDOC: meeting the challenges of enterprise computing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 44 - 45
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    An increasing demand for interoperable applications exists, sparking the real-time exchange of data across borders, applications, and IT platforms. To perform these tasks, enterprise computing now encompasses a new class of groundbreaking technologies such as Web services and service-oriented architecture (SOA); business process integration and management; and middleware support, like that for utility, grid, peer-to-peer, and autonomic computing. Enterprise computing also influences the processes for business modeling, consulting, and service delivery; it affects the design, development, and deployment of software architecture, as well as the monitoring and management of such architecture. As enterprises demand increasing levels of networked information and services to carry out business processes, IT professionals need conferences like EDOC to discuss emerging technologies and issues in enterprise computing. For these reasons, what started out as the Enterprise Distributed Object Computing (EDOC) conference has come to encompass much more than just distributed objects. So this event now used the name International EDOC Enterprise Computing Conference, to recognize this broader scope yet also retain the initial conference's name recognition. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Society Information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 46
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  • Resources

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 47 - 51
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  • 2005 Annual Index

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 53 - 57
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  • 2006 IEEE Computer Society Professional Membership/Subscription Application

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 59 - 60
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  • Advertiser/Product Index

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 61
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  • Higher education: who cares what the customer wants?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 62 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Higher education business process surveys ignore the most important part of what they're meant to study - the customers and services. In June 2005, the Educause Center for Applied Research (ECAR) published the report, "Good Enough! IT Investment and Business Process Performance in Higher Education." The content of the report describes the complex set of issues surrounding the performance of higher education business process in higher education and the influence of information technology, leadership, culture and other factors on process performance. However, there are deficiencies in the ECAR study and others like it is that nowhere in the report is there a mention of the customers or services that these processes are meant to support. Also, lacking from the study is that it did not collect satisfaction data from two of higher education's most important players, the faculty and students. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IT Professional is a bimonthly publication of the IEEE Computer Society for the developers and managers of enterprise information systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
San Murugesan
BRITE Professional Services