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Computer

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 29
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Masthead

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Article summaries

    Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Letters

    Page(s): 5 - 6
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  • The End of a Very Interesting Year

    Page(s): 7 - 8
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    The IEEE Computer Society's 2005 president reviews the accomplishments of the past year and looks to the future. View full abstract»

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  • It's Time to Move On

    Page(s): 9 - 12
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    Reflecting on his contributions to the At Random column during the past four years, Bob Colwell concludes that part of the fun of writing is recognizing the interconnections stimulated in real time while communicating. View full abstract»

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  • 32 & 16 Years Ago

    Page(s): 13 - 14
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    The more we know about yesterday, the better we will be able to deal with today. Computer offers this column providing excerpts from past issues to serve as a memory jogger for older members and as a perspective creator for newer members. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Society Information

    Page(s): 15
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  • Users make a Beeline for ZigBee sensor technology

    Page(s): 16 - 19
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    As wireless-sensor technology improves, an increasing number of organizations are using it for a wide range of purposes. Users are working with the technology to monitor and automate home, building, industrial, and agricultural systems, including thermostats and security products. To achieve technological and marketplace success, the low-power, inexpensive sensor networks need an economical, low-latency, robust, energy-efficient, wireless connectivity infrastructure. With this in mind, users are increasingly working with ZigBee technology. View full abstract»

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  • Will proposed standard make mobile phones more secure?

    Page(s): 20 - 22
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    Smart phones are becoming increasingly popular. Offering Internet connectivity, they function like minicomputers and can download a growing variety of applications and files, store personal information such as credit card numbers, and even conduct financial transactions. But as smart phones become more sophisticated, they are also becoming targets for hackers and virus writers. Because of increasing e-commerce capabilities, there is more value migrating to these devices. The Trusted Computing Group system would integrate data security into smart phones' core operations rather than implementing it via add-on applications. The TCG's Mobile Phone Work Group has published 11 use cases that, along with a set of technical requirements, will guide the specification work. The proposed standard would protect user data and transactions, as well as enable intellectual-property (IP) protection, a feature the entertainment industry wants before making popular content available for mobile devices. Nonetheless, the technology faces several potential hurdles. View full abstract»

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  • News Briefs

    Page(s): 23 - 25
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  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Research in the Digital Government Realm

    Page(s): 26 - 32
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    As they focus on the challenges that those who implement digital government face, computer science researchers practice nearly the entire spectrum of their discipline, working in collaboration with scientists from other disciplines in pursuit of answers to questions about information management, policy, and technology in government. Sidebar, p. 27. An IT View of Emergency ManagementJosé H. Canós, Technical University of Valencia, SpainMarcos R.S. Borges, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Gustavo Alonso, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ), Switzerland An emergency plan provides guidelines that government agencies can use for making management decisions promptly and efficiently when a critical emergency occurs. Sidebar, p. 28.Public Safety and Cross-Boundary Data Sharing: Lessons from the CapWin ProjectChristine B. Williams, Janis L. Gogan, and Jane Fedorowicz, Bentley CollegeThe CapWIN project represents one of the first integrated multistate transportation and public safety wireless networks in the US, enabling data interoperability for first responders wherever they are. Sidebar, p. 29.In the Real World of Digital Government: Successes and Challenges of E-RulemakingNeil Eisner, US Department of TransportationThe government currently uses electronic technology in all aspects of the e-rulemaking process, and it is working to develop additional methods that will help the public provide good data to use in making governmental decisions. Sidebar, p. 30.Research Issues in Healthcare InformaticsSylvia J. Spengler, US National Science FoundationAddressing both citizen needs and professional interests, which will be critical to gaining acceptance of a multifaceted approach to healthcare informatics, requires the kind of multifaceted approach that has been a hallmark of the NSF digital government program. View full abstract»

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  • Digital government research in academia

    Page(s): 33 - 39
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    Digital government projects are bringing together researchers from the technical and social sciences to participate in interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaborations that have the potential for making a broad and significant impact. We suspect that two distinct clusters are emerging in DG research: new IT tools for solving government problems on the one hand and, on the other, understanding sociotechnical systems with a focus on governance processes. These clusters are evident in this special issue's articles: three focus on new IT tools for government problems, and one addresses the implementation issues of a public Web portal. View full abstract»

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  • 2006 IEEE Computer Society Professional Membership / Subscription Application

    Page(s): 41 - 42
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  • Data alignment and integration [US government]

    Page(s): 43 - 50
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    A general-purpose solution to the problem of matching entities within or across heterogeneous data sources can't depend on the presence or reliability of auxiliary data such as structural information or metadata. Instead, it must leverage the available data (or observations) that describe the entities. Our technology, based on information theory principles, measures the importance of observations and then leverages them to quantify the similarity between entities, improving accuracy and reducing the time required to find related entities in a population. Applying this purely data-driven paradigm, we've built two systems: Guspin for automatically identifying equivalence classes or aliases, and Sift for automatically aligning data across databases. The key to our underlying technology is identifying the most informative observations and then matching entities that share them. Given the right types of observations, our model can potentially solve several serious and urgent problems that governments face, such as terrorist detection, identity theft, and data integration. View full abstract»

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  • Accessing government statistical information

    Page(s): 52 - 61
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    As government agencies provide increasing amounts of information through their Web sites, more people are attempting to make sense of it. The result is a significant volume of e-mail queries - many of which boil down to "Where can I find X?" or "What does X mean exactly?" Such queries underline a major stumbling block to widespread digital access: how best to provide highly codified, statistical data to a large, diverse population with varying levels of numerical literacy. The responsibility for this challenge falls to government statistical services, which must somehow package staggering amounts of data on everything from the gross national product to basic animal care in a way that a diversity of potential data users find palatable. The GovStat project aims to make the vast resources of government statistical data more broadly accessible to both agencies and the general population. Some first steps are creating layers of online help to address different browsing needs and developing prototype interfaces for exploring data. View full abstract»

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  • Building community information systems: the Connected Kids case

    Page(s): 62 - 69
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    New technologies make it feasible and, in many cases, practical for individuals, groups, and organizations to collaborate in the development of joint information systems. Users find collaborative information systems attractive because they make it possible to find information from diverse sources easily and efficiently. Such systems also make good sense for information providers because they can attract and serve a larger audience than a solitary effort might otherwise command, making it possible to pool resources to achieve certain economies of scale and technology expense. Conceived as both a digital government project and a community information system, Connected Kids helped bridge one city's digital divide by providing new information technologies to youth organizations. View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing government regulations using structural and domain information

    Page(s): 70 - 76
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    Government regulations, by extending laws with specific guidance for corporate and public actions, provide an important societal benefit. Ideally, they should be intelligible to ordinary citizens as well as rule makers, but the volume of regulations coupled with heavy referencing between provisions limit their accessibility. Apart from the difficulties in locating and understanding a particular regulation, users often must consult and reconcile multiple authoritative sources. For example, US companies frequently must comply with overlapping federal, state, and local regulations; in addition, some nonprofit organizations publish their own codes of practice. The problem is exacerbated in the European Union, where regulators must harmonize legislation across countries with different languages and traditions. To address the difficulties encountered in comparing regulatory documents with multiple authoritative sources, the Regnet project is developing a relatedness analysis system that exploits such document's unique computational properties. View full abstract»

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  • Computer Recognizes Expert Reviewers

    Page(s): 77 - 79
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    Computer's editor in chief extends her thanks to the more than 200 professionals who contributed their time and expertise as reviewers of article submissions in 2005. View full abstract»

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  • Williams Voted 2006 Computer Society President-Elect

    Page(s): 80 - 81
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    A summary of the recent election results provides Computer Society members information about officers elected to serve terms beginning in January 2006. View full abstract»

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  • Call and Calendar

    Page(s): 82 - 83
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  • Bookshelf

    Page(s): 84
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  • Products

    Page(s): 85
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  • Annual Index

    Page(s): 86 - 97
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    A listing of keywords and authors of articles published in Computer in 2005. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Computer, the flagship publication of the IEEE Computer Society, publishes highly acclaimed peer-reviewed articles written for and by professionals representing the full spectrum of computing technology from hardware to software and from current research to new applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ron Vetter
University of North Carolina
Wilmington