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Software, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Protocol design: redefining the state of the art

    Page(s): 17 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (630 KB)  

    The application of formal methods to high-level protocol design is addressed. A formal method is considered to be one that has the capability of rendering correctness proofs. The traditional and formal design processes are described and compared. The framework for proving logical correctness in protocol engineering is then discussed.<> View full abstract»

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  • Protocol validation for large-scale applications

    Page(s): 23 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (439 KB)  

    A threefold strategy incorporating formal modeling, structural decomposition and functional abstraction, and reachability analysis is described, and the role of each part in managing complexity is examined. Formal modeling helps weed out extraneous detail so that later work on decomposition and abstraction is easier. Decomposition and abstraction help divide complexity into manageability parts that the reachability algorithm can solve. Examples of the use of each are given.<> View full abstract»

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  • Testing communication protocols

    Page(s): 27 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2175 KB)  

    The authors describe a unifying, common intermediate model that lets Lotos specifications and TTCN test suites be translated into extended finite-state machines, providing a single medium for conformance testing. The paper covers specifying a protocol in Lotos, specifying test suites in TTCN, translating specifications to CIM, and the generation, verification, selection, parametrization, and execution of tests.<> View full abstract»

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  • Using artificial intelligence in communication system design

    Page(s): 38 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1078 KB)  

    The authors describe a knowledge-based design support system, called KDSS, that will help designers inexperienced in communication system design easily create advanced systems like intelligent networks, and large-scale distributed computing systems. They began by designing a support system for protocol and communication software. They then experimented with applying expert-system technology in design support systems and developed an expert system for protocol synthesis called KSPS. An expert system for protocol and communication software design that is based on the earlier work is also part of KDSS.<> View full abstract»

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  • A tool for graphical network modeling and analysis

    Page(s): 47 - 54
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (871 KB)  

    GMA, a generic graphical modeling and analysis package that satisfies both commercial users and performance evaluation researchers is described. Using a graphical interface, both novices and experts can analyze the performance of diverse networks simply by loading a configuration file and traffic data. GMA accommodates a variety of networks and modeling techniques. Its structure and use are described, and a simple four-node network is analyzed as an example.<> View full abstract»

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  • Computer-aided prototyping for a command-and-control system using CAPS

    Page(s): 56 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1808 KB)  

    A case study that shows the feasibility of using computer-aided prototyping to validate a C/sup 3/I system's requirements is presented, and the enabling technology is described. The C/sup 3/I prototype developed has characteristics typical of embedded software, including distributed processing, hard real-time constraints, multiple, predefined hardware interfaces, and complex requirements. A color, multiwindow executable Ada prototype that can process tactical data from multiple interfaces in real time was generated. The prototype was used to get feedback about the proposed design's effectiveness, performance, and structure and to evaluate the soundness of the design decisions.<> View full abstract»

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  • Detecting nondeterminacy in parallel programs

    Page(s): 69 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1588 KB)  

    Methods and tools for detecting nondeterminacy in programs for shared-memory multiprocessors are discussed. The approach described divides the debugging chore into two phases. The first phase uses tools that automatically detect nondeterminacy to debug synchronization errors, assuming it is decided at the outset to make the parallel program determinate. At the end of this phase, it is known that the program is determinate, that timing differences will not affect results, and the debugging sessions are repeatable. In the second phase, an interactive break-point debugger is used to find arithmetic and logical errors. The proposed tools fall into two groups: those that statically analyze the source program and those that analyze an execution trace of the program.<> View full abstract»

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  • Is source-code escrow a viable compromise?

    Page(s): 83 - 85
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (353 KB)  

    The author examines a concept called source-code escrow-having a third party hold the source code in trust until and if certain conditions are fulfilled-which has recently been touted as a good compromise to the problem that software vendors often refuse to provide source code to their users, who typically want source code for security. The author discusses the issues involved in deciding when and under what circumstances customers get a vendor's source code. It is concluded that escrow can protect both the user's and vendor's concerns about source-code access as long as it is handled carefully.<> View full abstract»

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  • Why we need checks and balances to assure quality (software quality)

    Page(s): 102 - 103
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB)  

    The author describes some of the human issues surrounding formal product assurance. He rebuts the three arguments that software engineering practitioners use to avoid taking product assurance seriously: it's a luxury, it doesn't add value, and we can do it ourselves.<> View full abstract»

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Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
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