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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Nov. 2005

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management publication information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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  • From the Editor

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 417 - 418
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  • Technology alliances and networks: an external link to research capability

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 419 - 428
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Few studies of technology alliances have explicitly examined the link between internal research capability and external sources of innovation via interfirm networks. While different partners bring with them different sets of resource opportunities, the networks can serve as "pipes" of information via indirect partners. This research examined whether the level of research capability moderates the performance impact of a firm's network accessibility in terms of the number of technology partners and the firm's centrality in the network. Interviews were also conducted with management executives and engineers to investigate the underlying motives and strategy of technology alliances. While the statistical findings show that increasing research capability enhances the benefits of information access via centrality, our interview data provide support that the role of good engineers as technology gatekeepers is critical to the success of leveraging partners' resources. Building upon the rich qualitative data, we conclude the study with an organizational framework of technology strategy. This paper contributes to engineering management research by linking both strategic and organizational factors of research capability in acquiring external sources of innovation. View full abstract»

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  • Innovation in power semiconductor industry: past and future

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 429 - 439
    Cited by:  Papers (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (792 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Power microelectronics plays an important role in many of the consumer and industrial applications today. With increase in demand for energy savings and efficient systems, the requirements for rapid advancement in MOS controlled power semiconductor device concepts and technologies are becoming more crucial than ever before. This puts a considerable pressure on industries to be innovative and competitive at the device, technology, manufacturing, and marketing levels. Today manufacturing companies are faced with intensifying competition and a turbulent economic environment. To some extent technology is seen as a means by which firms can strive to adapt to the requirements of this difficult and uncertain environment. On the other hand, rapid rates of technological change and associated shorter product cycles are themselves part of the difficulty, as is the increased blurring of long-established industrial boundaries (Kodama's, 1985) process of "technological fusion". The growing complexity and increased pace of industrial technological change especially in power microelectronics are forcing firms to forge new alliances and to seek greater flexibility and efficiency in responding to market changes. The aim of this paper is to explore these aspects. View full abstract»

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  • Information technology and supply chain collaboration: moderating effects of existing relationships between partners

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 440 - 448
    Cited by:  Papers (31)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Previous studies suggest that information technology (IT) is critical to the development of collaboration between supply chain partners. Our study posits that the effect of IT is not predetermined by its technological capabilities. Rather, its effect on interorganizational collaboration is the emergent properties of the interplay between IT and existing relationships between partners. Based on the literature, we selected four dimensions of supplier-retailer relationship (trust, interdependence, long-term orientation, and information sharing) to investigate the moderating effect of existing relationships on the efficacy of IT. Using case research that involved direct observation and systematic interviews with five pairs of suppliers and retailers, we verified that existing formative contexts between partners both enable and constrain the effect of IT on interorganizational collaboration. In addition, IT reinforces and stabilizes the already existing interorganizational structures and arrangements. Overall, the results suggest that cooperative formative contexts between partners should precede the IT-based interorganizational linkage effort. View full abstract»

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  • Managerial assessments of E-business investment opportunities: a field study

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 449 - 460
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (456 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Managers charged with assessing investment opportunities for information technologies such as e-business projects face considerable uncertainty in their decision-making processes. Contemporary theories of the firm and the normative prescriptions thereof emphasize the potential for such investments to augment firm-level knowledge and relational capabilities. However, prior research has not examined the relative emphases that managers place on the knowledge and relational capability-augmenting characteristics of the e-business investments. In this paper, we develop a model to assess whether managerial evaluations of e-business investment opportunities are consistent with these normative and theoretical prescriptions. A test of the model using survey data on 485 project assessments by e-business managers suggests that managerial assessment and choice are guided by the criteria suggested by the knowledge and relational theories in evaluating potential e-business initiatives. Our results demonstrate that the ability of firms to exploit their intangible assets through such investments explicitly enter managerial calculus and provide new insights into the relative importance ascribed to these factors. The overarching insight is that managers ascribe relatively more weight to knowledge-based considerations than to relational considerations. View full abstract»

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  • A consumer perspective of E-service quality

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 461 - 477
    Cited by:  Papers (42)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    E-service is an emerging and rapidly evolving area as demonstrated by new technological innovations introduced to improve e-service. Motivated by the growing interest in online commerce, we focus our research questions on examining the factors that contribute to e-service, the relationships among these factors and the consumers' attitude toward e-service. To explore answers to our research questions, we developed an e-service model. Specifically, our proposed model consists of such constructs as individual differences, e-service convenience, Web site service quality, risk, e-satisfaction, and intention. We develop an e-service quality survey instrument and use empirical data to validate the instrument. The results of our empirical study validate our eight hypotheses. We confirm seven of the eight hypotheses. One hypothesis that tested individual differences and service convenience was not confirmed. However, we found that service convenience, Web site service quality, and risk are significant factors affecting consumers' satisfaction level, which in turn affects intention. The findings suggest that managers need to understand e-convenience from the consumers' perspective. In order to provide better services for users, companies need to invest in Web site service quality design and evaluation, and at the same time, control the perceived risk associated with using it. View full abstract»

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  • Prototype stopping rules in software development projects

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 478 - 485
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (384 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Custom software development projects under product specification uncertainty can be subject to wide variations in performance (duration, cost, and quality) depending on how the uncertainty is resolved. A prototyping strategy has been chosen in many cases to mitigate specification risk and improve performance. The study reported here sought to illuminate the case where duration was the highest priority project constraint, a feature that has often called for a concurrent development process. Unlike concurrent engineering, however, the process in this paper was a sequential, three-phase approach including an optional, up-front prototyping phase, a nominal-duration construction phase, and a variable length rework phase that grew with the arrival of specification modifications. The source of uncertainty was the modification arrival time; the management control point was the amount of time spent engaged in prototyping activities. Results showed that in situations where the modification arrival rate was sufficiently faster during prototyping than during construction, a minimal-duration choice was available. The model also returned the solution to perform no prototyping in cases where arrival rates were nearly equivalent between phases, or when the rework cost associated with modifications was consistently low. View full abstract»

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  • An analytical model of E-recruiting investment decision: an economic employment approach

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 486 - 496
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (392 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The online recruiting market is one of the most rapidly growing e-commerce areas. Since the mid-1990s, a number of e-recruiting methods such as job boards, corporate career Web sites, and e-recruiting consortia have been introduced into the labor market. Among them, e-recruiting with the use of a corporate career Web site has been touted as the most efficient and cost-effective recruiting method. While the corporate career Web sites have experienced a phenomenal growth, no formal economic models have been developed for the analysis and assessment of investment decisions in various e-recruiting technologies. In this paper, a mathematics-based economic decision model for e-recruiting technology investment is introduced to evaluate the economic impact of various e-recruiting technologies. A classical economic order quantity (EOQ) model was extended to include costs uniquely associated with recruiting activities such as staffing and coordination costs. We derive a minimum employment level for an optimal investment in e-recruiting technologies. The model suggests that the optimal investment cost increases rapidly near the minimum number of employees to be recruited, but the growth of the optimal investment cost slows down as the total number of employees becomes greater than the minimum number of employees to be recruited. View full abstract»

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  • Assessing and moving on from the dominant project management discourse in the light of project overruns

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 497 - 508
    Cited by:  Papers (53)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There has been much prescriptive work in project management, exemplified in various "Bodies of Knowledge". However, experience shows some projects overspending considerably. Recently, systemic modeling research into the behavior of large projects explains project oversponds by "systemic" effects and the (sometimes counterintuitive) effect of management actions. However, while this work is becoming more widely known, embedding the lessons in project-management practice is not straightforward. The current prescriptive dominant discourse of project management contains implicit underlying assumptions with which the systemic modeling work clashes, indeed showing how conventional methods can exacerbate rather than alleviate project problems. Exploration of this modeling suggests that for projects that are complex, uncertain, and time-limited, conventional methods might be inappropriate, and aspects of newer methodologies in which the project "emerges" rather than being fully preplanned might be more appropriate. Some of the current literature on project-classification schemes also suggests similar parameters, without the rationale that the systemic modeling provides, thus providing useful backup to this analysis. The eventual aim of this line of work is to enable project managers to choose effective ways to manage projects based on understanding and model-based theory. View full abstract»

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  • Component sharing in complex products and systems: challenges, solutions, and practical implications

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 509 - 521
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we explore whether a multiproject management approach is helpful in complex products and systems (CoPS) environments. CoPS are high cost, engineering-intensive products and systems, tailor-made according to client's specifications. The focus of this paper is on the possibilities for sharing components between projects in CoPS multiproject environments. Component sharing is the process through which technological components and platforms are transferred and shared between projects. The vast majority of evidence about component sharing is based on empirical research in mass-producing companies. Little has been reported in the CoPS literature about similar processes. To contribute to this gap, this paper discusses challenges faced and solutions applied by a supplier of CoPS, an aerospace company, when attempting to share components between projects in its multiproject environment. Three main areas are examined that facilitate sharing between projects given the unique strategic context of CoPS: coordination and communication mechanisms that facilitate linkages across projects; knowledge transfer mechanisms; and an organizational form that centralizes some of the development activities. This paper concludes by offering managers and engineers a set of tools to consider component sharing in a CoPS environment. View full abstract»

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  • Forthcoming Engineering Management Conferences

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 522
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  • The IEEE EMS Annual International Engineering Management Conference (IEMC2006)

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 523
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  • Special interest groups for the IEEE Engineering Management Society

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 524
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  • Papers to be published in future issues of IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 525 - 526
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  • Acknowledgment of Reviewers

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 527 - 528
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management November 2005 readership survey

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 529 - 530
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  • Special issue on theme: University technology transfer

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 531
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  • IEEE order form for reprints

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 532
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  • 2005 Index

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 533 - 536
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society Information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management information for authors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas