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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Automated aspect-oriented decomposition of process-control systems for ultra-high dependability assurance

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 713 - 732
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1400 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a method for decomposing process-control systems. This decomposition method is automated, meaning that a series of principles that can be evolved to support automated tools are given to help a designer decompose complex systems into a collection of simpler components. Each component resulting from the decomposition process can be designed and implemented independently of the ot... View full abstract»

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  • A survey of controlled experiments in software engineering

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 733 - 753
    Cited by:  Papers (119)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3056 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The classical method for identifying cause-effect relationships is to conduct controlled experiments. This paper reports upon the present state of how controlled experiments in software engineering are conducted and the extent to which relevant information is reported. Among the 5,453 scientific articles published in 12 leading software engineering journals and conferences in the decade from 1993 ... View full abstract»

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  • A comparison of software project overruns - flexible versus sequential development models

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 754 - 766
    Cited by:  Papers (22)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Flexible software development models, e.g., evolutionary and incremental models, have become increasingly popular. Advocates claim that among the benefits of using these models is reduced overruns, which is one of the main challenges of software project management. This paper describes an in-depth survey of software development projects. The results support the claim that projects which employ a f... View full abstract»

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  • Resolving race conditions in asynchronous partial order scenarios

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 767 - 784
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (864 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Scenario-based requirements specifications are the industry norm for defining communication protocols. However, such scenarios often contain race conditions. A race condition occurs when events are specified to occur in a particular order, but in practice, this order cannot be guaranteed. The paper considers UML/MSC scenarios that can be described with standard partial order theoretic asynchronous... View full abstract»

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  • Achieving efficiency and portability in systems software: a case study on POSIX-compliant multithreaded programs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 785 - 800
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1832 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Portable (standards-compliant) systems software is usually associated with unavoidable overhead from the standards-prescribed interface. For example, consider the POSIX Threads standard facility for using thread-specific data (TSD) to implement multithreaded code. The first TSD reference must be preceded by pthread_getspecific( ), typically implemented as a function or macro with 40-50 instru... View full abstract»

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  • TSE Information for authors

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c4
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org